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  1. Kilgon

    Kilgon

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  2. machattack

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/12/2020 in all areas

  1. As long as whatever you're attaching your block and tackle to will support the weight of the transmission and engine I would remove them together. Faster and easier. I have a transmission jack and still prefer to remove them together. I've removed transmissions just using a regular floor jack, difficult balancing act by your self. Please make sure your overhead support will handle the load.
    1 point
  2. If you're working by your lonesome, you are probably best served to remove the tranny first then the engine should come out without too much trouble. Anyway, welcome aboard! Keep up posted with plenty o pics!
    1 point
  3. 1 point
  4. Welcome from Ohio. Nice project car. You can get a data sticker and more information about your car from marti auto works at https://www.martiauto.com/martireports.cfm
    1 point
  5. Buy two. One should always be in the tool box.
    1 point
  6. Hello and welcome from SW Ontario, Canada, There is some interesting artwork on that one. Hoping your intent will back to the original as much as possible. Good luck with your find. Stanglover.
    1 point
  7. Welcome from Idaho! Congrats on your new endeavor. That Red Vermilion interior will be a challenge for sure. Im still getting all my stuff together. Problem is matching the color from so many vendors. Seems every vendor has a different shade, so some rattle can dye will bring it together. Again......WELCOME ABOARD
    1 point
  8. Thanks Rocketfoot for the organization on the T-shirts. I received Sally's T-shirt. The plane leaves for Seattle in the morning and I will hand deliver it to Mustang Sally in the Hospital. She will be delighted cause thats about all she wears is T-shirts. She has One doctor jealous of her 71 mach stang, feels good to have something a doctor dosnt have.
    1 point
  9. Most engines usually have one cylinder that runs leaner than the others due to distribution issues. It is usually easily identifiable by looking at the plugs. On mine it is number 4. For safety sake you are always going to tune for the demands of the leanest cylinder, so the rule of thumb is to install the sensor on the side with the lean cylinder. Since it is nearly impossible to tune individual cylinder a/f ratios with a carb, I don't think the trouble or the expense of multiple sensors is warranted. If/when you upgrade to a throttle body FI system I would use the sensor that
    1 point
  10. Most newer EFI systems use wideband sensors. The FiTech uses a Bosch as well, but I don't know if it is interchangeable with the Holley. Probably not. In regards to placement, you want it downstream from the collector, but not too far so if it is used for EFI, then the feedback can be as quick as possible. Per example FiTech recommends "The ideal location for the Sensor is 2-4 inches after the exhaust collector." They recommend locating it in the #1 cylinder bank, or passenger side for us. I have always wondered if there is a noticeable difference between banks.
    1 point
  11. Absolutely a 73. Mine had the vinyl roof and bumper guards when I found it but chose to remove during resto. This is almost like Deja Vu. Had to check my garage to be sure!! Ha-ha.
    1 point
  12. Properly welded bung located far enough downstream is highly recommended if you go ahead with the sensor. Clamp-on could have the potential to loosen & develop leak if long term. Probably same amount of effort to install either way so its worth installing bung which (if you are just using to do initial tune) can be sealed with screw-in plug when finished. The ability to use O2 sensor with future EFI depends on the system. Holley uses proprietary Bosch sensor which is outrageously expensive, but is the only one the system will function with.
    1 point
  13. '73 for sure...that half-vinyl roof is something I don't see often, I believe it was an option, but not really sure I've ever seen it on a Mach. Rear window louvers are an obvious owner touch. Nice looking car from what we can see here.
    1 point
  14. Nice work! Thanks for posting.
    1 point
  15. Great to see you taking to bare metal. On one of the facebook forums a so called expert is saying just sand the old paint and paint over it. Not very professional in my opinion. I have been stripping lots of parts and have not found any that did not have surface rust buried under the original Ford paint. On the Q vert the PO had the body dipped stripped and was back to rolling chassis with primer. I was block sanding the RF fender and saw some color so I got DA and yep he had switched fenders and it had not been stripped. When I got down to metal there was the usual rust. Parts sat around
    1 point
  16. Nice project, keep up the good work! Ryan
    1 point
  17. Just ran into this on Instagram. Don't know anything else about it.
    1 point
  18. Great work! Hopefully mine will turn out as well as yours.
    1 point
  19. Looking really good. Your hard work is paying off and you are going to have one sweet ride when it is done. Can't wait to see it when it is finished.
    1 point
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