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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/28/2021 in all areas

  1. I had taken the engine to the machine shop back in early December. They had said it would take about 2 weeks, which turned into closer to 6 weeks. The owner, I found out, was winding down, moving into retirement, and the shop seemed a bit disorganized, but they had gotten decent reviews. Once I got the motor home, I got it on the engine stand, sprayed it with a generous coating of WD-40, and bagged it. Every couple weeks, I would pull the bag off, spray it with more WD-40, and recover it. After the Rickster went off to paint, it was time to get to work on the motor. I cleaned it, checked it, and then cleaned it again. I checked the crankshaft main bearing clearances with plastigage and all were in spec. I checked the rod bearing clearances with plastigage, as well, and all were right on the money. Great!!! Pistons and rings were installed and everything seemed normal enough. Cam installation was straightforward. I installed a Lunati roller cam and lifters. I got the head gaskets and Trickflow cylinder heads bolted on and torqued. The intake manifold was next and that is where things started going sideways. The intake bolts on the Cleveland, of course, are angled, and the intake must be matched to the head quite precisely. I was having no luck getting them to line up. I determined that the manifold was sitting to high. The block had been decked, but only enough to square it. The machinist couldn't remember exactly how much he had taken off, which I found a little concering. Hmmm. I took the intake manifold to the shop, and they informed me that the Edelbrock Performer 2V intake manifold had been previously milled. We decided that they should take .020 to .030 off each side and see where it sat. In the end, they took off .027 off each side, which was needed to true up one side that was out of square. Great. The intake manifold now sits where it need so the gaskets will seal it properly. Before buttoning it all up, though, I measured for new pushrods, which turned out to be 8.100. Got them ordered figuring it would take the normal 2 days to get here. Eight days later, they arrived, having traveled across much of the USA. Pushrods installed, roller rockers installed and lash set, and finally, the valve cover gaskets can go on. But wait, the rollers are keeping the stock valve covers that I had thoroughly cleaned, removed dents, and painted. The right side actually fit, but the driver side was definitely interfering. New valve covers were ordered and arrived a few days later. I got them intalled, and they fit fine, but seem kind of tall. I am going to use the FAST EZ EFI system, because I have it from an older project that stalled out a few years back. I put the throttle body on the intake and set the ram air cleaner box on it, only to find that it fouled on the valve covers. Soooo, I ordered a 1/2" spacer and now have a maybe 1/4" clearance. With all that sorted, I got the distributor which had a busted vacuum advance nipple, so I got a new vacuum advance for it, I got the tiny clip removed and then the first screw. Both screws were rusty, but the first one came out okay, taking my time and using penetrating oil and heat. The second screw decided to just wring off about halfway down the hole. I tried to drill it out, but the drill bit broke off, so I have been fighting the thing fixed for 6 or 7 weeks now. I took it to a local machine shop, but they were too backed up to help me out. They did tell me, though, that the machine shop had done the machine work on the block had had a lot of problems with quality control lately, and had ruined a few blocks and cylinder heads. I felt okay about the crank and rod bearing clearances, but hadn't checked the bores. Soooo, off comes the intake, valve cover, rockers and pushrods, cylinder heads, etc. I got out the dial bore gauge and micrometer, and measured each bore at the bottom, just above the piston, middle of the run and at the top of the bore, front to back, and side to side. Six measurements on each cylinder. Each cylinder was pretty uniform, with the 48 measurements ranging from 4.03035 to 4.03102. Most of the cylinders were within about .00030 to .00040, although some of that can be just variation inherent in measuring the diameter of a cylinder. I am satisfied, though, that they didn't screw it up, so I got new intake manifold gaskets, and got the motor put back together, once again. Back to the distributor, I finally found a machine shop that said they might be about to repair it, so I'm hoping that in the next few days, I'll get good news from them. Then I can get the distributor rebuilt, and installed. I did look into a new Pertronix billet distributor, but it didn't fit under the air box. I just found that they do make shorter Pertronix distributors, but at this point, I'm waiting for the machine shop. So that is my engine building saga. Thanks to Don at Ohio Mustang for helping me out with AC and power steering brackets. It's coming together, slowly, but surely. Hopefully, the Rickster will be back soon, and we can get that motor filling the engine bay.
    2 points
  2. Past weekend was dry, warm... Sooooo: barbecue time!! All the new parts that I've received over past months were either not coated, simply oiled or covered with some poor paint. None had of course the kind of finish I had in mind for them. So spend a good part of my saturday cleaning & degreasing them and mask/tape all the parts I could not remove, rubbers, threads etc.. Then just like the restored parts, they did receive a primer, their respective colors and a nice thick finish coat. Sunday was like xmas, lots to unwrap and it was even time to put some stuffs together, install nipples etc... Reassembled the spindles done last weeks with ther hardware plated last year. Installed all back together after a good cleaning and copper greasing of each thread. Was lots of work to get there, zinc plating them was not the easiest thing to do. But now, boy do they not look like a million??! :D Yes these are the same!! :D I know btw I need some wires for their nuts, Anyone have some info on how it should be done the right way? Never done that before, but really would love to have them "twisted" the right secure way. I will buy some SS wire for that asap. Then it was time to put the top arms together... 50 years old and looking goooood :D Then it was time to put all these babies together back into their original nest that is now making a nice contrast with its semi gloss black. Nothing torqued to specs yet until all is on.. Also gave love to the koni's that were plated last year and gave them the car body color (no red), that will look nice into the light grey coils that were done last week... All with all, it was nice to finally see all the work started last novembre come together! The other side fx is that I could get rid of many boxes and create some welcome space. One regret is that the long part that connects both sides (rod assembly, the drag link I think is the name) is still at a friend's place where it needs to go under press to correct the bow into it created at some point when someone jacked up the car with it... No biggy tho, as once I will have the steering box revised, i will need to paint it as well, so will do both at the same time. to be continued...
    2 points
  3. Well, it's been close to 3 months since I've posted an update, but that doesn't mean I haven't been doing anything. I've gotten the instrument cluster back together with LED bulbs installed. I got the steering column painted and reassembled, but the turn signal switch is binding, so I'll have to go back through it, one more time. I got the front and rear seats reupholstered with new foam and seat covers from TMI. Most of the wrinkles seen in the picture were worked out, and overall, the seats look pretty good. I also cut open the top of the new fuel tank and installed the new Tanks, Inc. electric fuel pump. I pretty much did what Autoedit did in the YouTube video, except I used a body saw instead of a hole saw, and oriented the fuel reservoir away from the sending unit to keep it from interfering, but otherwise did pretty much the same. A little work with the hammer and dolly got the lip flattened out and lining up with the sealing ring pretty well. Once the steel retaining ring is placed on the inside edge of the hole and the screws tightened down, it straightens the edge up even better. The retaining ring is installed and the screws inserted to secure it. The Viton washers were removed so that they would not get damaged when the retaining ring was tacked into the opening. After tack welding between each of the screw hole locations, the welds were ground down to make the top flush. Then the tank was cleaned with WD-40 and a magnet, plus wiping it out with some paper towels, and then more WD-40. It was a new tank, but I had gotten from a guy on Facebook marketplace, and there was a little but of crud inside it. It wasn't rust, but I'm not sure what it was. It took a little bit, but I was able to get the tank cleaned out really well. Then, it was time for the gasket sealer, top, and all those screws. Overall, the tank came out really well, and I'm pleased with it. Also, I've kept busy, building a motor for the Rickster. With all the Covid stuff going on, it took a while to get the cylinder heads shipped, but I finally got everything I needed. I had to hit up Don at Ohio Mustang Supply a few times for brackets, etc. since some were missing. I got the Power steering pump and brackets from him. It's a 50 year old pump of unknown history, so I went ahead and rebuilt it. Twice. When they say try not to let the spider come apart, there is a reason for that. My first attempt at reassembly, I got it wrong, and after reinstalling the pump discovered it wouldn't turn very easily. I pulled it all apart, went back through it, and found I had the slippers upside down. DOH!!! After the second or third time putting the spider together, I did develop a feel for it, and it's not difficult, but the first time or two, it can be pretty frustrating. Once reassembled, I double checked and it turned easily, and after installation on the motor, it only required 4 in-lbs of force to turn the pulley, well, within the factory spec of 2-15 in-lbs. Tomorrow, I'll post about the engine build but that's enough for now. Except to say, that the paint shop says the Rickster is very close to done, and should be back in my garage in the next week or so. WooHoo!!! Then the real fun begins - reassembly.
    2 points
  4. On the radio back from my garage I heard about the passing of ZZ Top's bassist Dusty Hill today, very sad news. Been my favorite band for over 30 years, seem 'm live 3 times and got the ZZ hangin' off my Mustang's keys. I do believe they hold the record for the band with longest original members, that timer has now stopped... Sad.
    1 point
  5. 1 point
  6. OK, some photos and a few words to go with them... And as always, when you peel a layer back you find more to do... The dash is back in after major rewiring and tidying up, found it was a Chevy Nova steering column so have new AC Delco turn signal unit and NOS ignition barrel and key and new leather steering wheel - and have fabricated a bracket to use a standard mustang ignition switch. NOS door and trunk barrels and keys. New carpet on order, interior retrimmed, heat and sound proofing installed on the floor, 15" Magnum 500s ordered for a more period look. New front driving lights, converted to chrome bumper and refitted the front air dam. 'Adjusted' the T bar shifter to align correctly with the C6 shift range so D on the shifter matches D on the transmission. Am changing the 3 point seat belts to lap sash only and the 3rd point is too low and it'll be broken shoulder material in a crash. New flexible PCB on the back of the dash cluster and upgraded to LED backlighting (much better) - cleaned out the dials to get rid of the dust on the inside! Plus lots of little things... On the conversion, the main wiring loom still comes through the firewall on the LHS - it's now a bulge under the passenger's toes! The heater is disconnected and all the vacuum pipes have rotted away and the air conditioner unit is fitted on the LHS but not connected - I'd say when the conversion and engine transplant happened it all went... The car used to live in northern Queensland which is a tropical environment so not much call for a heater but I'd have thought AC would have been needed. Now thinking about moving the coil pack back onto the inner guard so I can fit a AC compressor up high on the engine where they seem to be typcially fitted - there's spare pulley grooves and I can fit a condenser in front of the radiator - so we'll see...
    1 point
  7. Today I took apart the front seats and cleaned them up. I also repainted and lubricated the seat tracks. Next I took apart the instrument cluster to replace the lens and clean things up.
    1 point
  8. I could use a couple cans of r12.
    1 point
  9. haven’t had time to post or work on the car in a couple weeks .finally got the rear done . The old ladder bar bracket weld had completely failed also started polishing up these 30yr old draglites
    1 point
  10. I installed this clip just as directed by Tim- pushing into the hole and with pliers and squeezing the tabs together. Two photos below. From underneath the car and from the footwell:
    1 point
  11. Me and a couple of guys from work on Friday.
    1 point
  12. Hi Moose That is repairable ... an easy piece of work for me -- but may be fiddly and irritating for someone who's not done it before Its done in the same way I rebuild blown track on Printed Circuit Boards in the electronic systems I deal with at work. I don't disagree - its a painstaking, often irritating job. Clean and lap down the faces where it has blown raised areas with tiny diamond tip of a Dremel (small rotary tool) Clean any copper spatter out of the trenches Get slightly oversized diameter copper wire - remove the enamel and make a piece to fit precisely into your gap Place a tiny drop of nail varnish (Yes ....girlie nail varnish) in the gap (clear is best so you can see the substrate you're working on) With tweezers lay the piece into the gap and let the varnish harden (5mins) Solder each end delicately ("Sodder" in Amercanese ) Then flatten to the same surface height by removing excess copper/sodder with fine diamond dip with Dremel Fine polish with wet/dry emery paper voila - a new track
    1 point
  13. More progress. Pulled rearend. Removed pumpkin. Waiting on new yoke (upgraded to 1350 u-joint).
    1 point
  14. I installed new rear axle seals and brakes. Thankfully the rear bearings were good so I didn't need to replace them. Rear drum brakes are something I really don't enjoy doing. It is a very messy job and even with the right brake tools I always end up struggling with a spring or retainer. A scrape or cut on one hand or the other just add to the experience. I am happy to have the job behind me. Tomorrow I dig into the heater core replacement. After researching what is involved to get to the heater core I suspect I going to find I prefer working on rear brakes...
    1 point
  15. The parts fairy made a visit today. Two new top cylinders installed, first pass at rim blow rebuild.
    1 point
  16. Takes after grandpas beer belly 😂
    1 point
  17. Well, today I moved to the other end of the powertrain. I removed the factory 2.75 one-wheeler-peeler and installed a new 3.81 Eaton Truetrac rear end that I purchased from Quick Performance. First I pulled the axles. Here's what the diff looks like after 48 years. I spent more time removing the old gasket that all the rest of the job combined! Since the new gasket ran me $20!!, I figured it deserved a photo of it's own: And now the finished install. Damn was it heavy. Heavier than the Tremec transmission. Tomorrow I plan to tackle the rear brakes, install new axle seals, and put the rear end back together so I can lower the car and measure for the new driveshaft.
    1 point
  18. The heater control valve goes in one of the heater hoses. This thread should help you, has some diagrams Heater Hoses, routing - General Maintenance and Repair - 7173Mustangs.com
    1 point
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