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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/11/2021 in all areas

  1. O.K.now! I got off the computer and grabbed the camera, so I could download some finishing photos of those 289 heads. These will be going on my 289 Hi-Po / Cobra engine project. Over the years, I've come across almost all of the original factory pieces, some hard to find, but never a set of original heads, which I intended to modify anyway, so garden variety 289 castings are what I modified, which will run just as good without desecrating rare castings. So, here are some finished photos....I've previously posted the porting photos. First up are two photos of the oil-shedding coating internally of Glyptal. Third photo shows installation of the new stainless valves 1.880 / 1.600. Note these are larger than the stock factory Hi-Po valves, but correct for competition Shelby/ Cobra useage. Four through Seven show fully assembled and painted the correct 1965 Ford Semi-Gloss Black, correct springs and Hi-Po factory retainers. The pushrod slots were worn, so they got drilled out and a set of vintage Pro Stock Engineering guideplates now stabilize the pushrods. Rocker arms ( not shown ) to be used, are original stock Ford pieces, ground, stress-relieved, and cryo-treated for longetivity. Heads are stamped with VHS's logo. Black paintjob is nicer than the photos look. Finished product is flawless work of Toby ( porting and polishing ), and Ruben ( all seat, guide, chamber, machining, valve work, and set-up ) of VHS, while I was working there. Thanks Compadres!
    2 points
  2. A set of Shop Manuals (5 volumes plus wiring diagrams) would be the first one I would get. Even if you don't plan on doing all of the work yourself it is a good reference to make sure whoever is doing the work isn't blowing smoke when they tell you what needs to be done. While a set of Assembly Manuals are a great reference for reassembling your car, taking pictures of the tear-down are even better. The illustrations in them are a good reference as well as some of the detailed instructions on how some things go together. The Parts Manuals are also a good reference, especially the illustrations, which show exploded views of the parts. Hard copies of the manuals are available, repro from vendors, originals from eBay sometimes. Electronic (pdf) versions of all of them are also available from vendors. SHOP MANUAL, PRINTED, 1971 FORD MERCURY CAR - #L-27A - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com) SHOP MANUAL, 1971 - #L-SM-71C - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com) The colorized version of the wiring is nice, but not necessary, the wiring diagrams are available on this forum in the Wiki section. WIRE DIAGRAMS, 1971 - #L-WD-71A - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com) CD, FACTORY ASSEMBLY MANUALS, 1971-1973, 6 VOLUME SET - #L-FAM-7173A - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com) Ford eBook Downloads 3 (factoryrepairmanuals.com) If you don't have one, the owners manual is also nice to have, also available from many of the vendors in hard copy. By the way, welcome from Oregon.
    1 point
  3. It was fantastic to see the younger generation just as car crazy as I was at that age. And to be so skilled at what they do as I was at that age. We were lucky to have had them take time out from their schedule and come to our house to do a job. I certainly wasn't ranking on young people. Hope it didn't come across that way. Friends from yesteryear have also enjoyed the recent pics. Albeit a good ribbing came with the "looks incredible" comments. They reminded me more than once how diehard of a bowtie guy I was back in the day. Not that I didn't appreciate the blue oval. I sure did. Those friends of yesteryear had awesome ones that I still tell stories about to folks that I end up talking cars with today. But I do remind them that the Mach 1 isn't mine. It's my lady's Mustang.
    1 point
  4. Works for me - that's what I'm doing right now. I joined the USAF in Oct 1986, stayed until Oct 1996, wandered the world aimlessly as a Defense Contractor for 11 years (only things I have to show for that time are 7 different company polos hanging in the closet and a couple of orphaned 401Ks), then hired on to Civil Service in Sep 2007. A little over 6 years to go, and I'm done! Being presented with a squadron mentorship award that I actually designed in Oct 1996 just before I got out.
    1 point
  5. I got the same Summit Racing kit Kevin (and others) did - the kit is complete with mounting hardware (the hinges and latches pretty much stick onto the glass). They don't go all the way to the bottom of the window, but then again, who cares - that part doesn't need the shade that bad, anyway. They also don't hamper rear vis at all - just horizontal lines you barely even notice once they're there. The worst thing they do is rip a thread or two out of the duster when I use it if I'm not careful. I added a couple pieces of windlace to the last slat 'just in case' the trunk lid got too close... and it never does. This isn't even the best picture to illustrate how virtually invisible they become from the driver seat, but you can see inside from the rear quite nicely. I like it because it adds to the 'Day Two - Old School' restomod look. Big fat raised white letter tires on Cragars, louvers, louder than stock mufflers with headers, Lakewood 'slapper' traction bars, and what more do ya need (well... power windows & locks, AM/FM/BT/USB Retrosound stereo, modern HVAC, an AOD, and LEDs... but nobody can really tell with those, since they're not cosmetic). I can slap the pizza cutters back on and it'll look pretty near factory fresh. But why would I want to?
    1 point
  6. Well I splurged on a pair of these because one of the guys involved lives very near to me. And because out of 3 cars in the family they all have issues or cracks on these. Every time I find someone who has some they are usually broken and they still want a lot of $$ for them. These are also beefed up on one edge to make them stronger, and the plastic is not 50 years old. My first impression is how beefy they are. The texture is spot on and very crisp. I held one up to an old one in my car and it looks like it will be a perfect fit. Unfortunately I won't be installing them until I decide which car is getting restored first. I will post a few pics so you can see them. Feel free to ask me any questions about them, I will try to answer the best I can.
    1 point
  7. Enlisted US Army 1974-1978 Georgia Army National Guard 1978-1979 Commissioned US Army Reserve 2LT 1982-1984 US Army 1984-1995 US Army Reserve 2000-2011 retired Lieutenant Colonel
    1 point
  8. Welcome from Ohio. Sorry for the lost of your friend. It's nice to know the story behind your car. As far as restoring your car you need to answer two questions - 1. what level of restoration do I want and 2. how much money am I willing to spend. Even with a car in fairly good shape a full restoration could still run in the upper teens to mid $20k at least. Next question is how much am I going to do vs sending it out to a shop. When it comes to budget this could make the difference of something getting done or not. Labor prices can eat a hole in your pocket in no time. Anything you can do yourself is money staying in the car. I would make a list of the obvious things that need to be replaced or repaired to start with and work from there. As far as getting help you can't find a better place or group of people to work with. There are lots of threads on here and good info to be had. You might want to checkout the https://7173mustangs.com/forums/forum/78-individual-project-build-threads/. This should help guide you some. Good luck and keep us posted on your progress.
    1 point
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