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  1. Me and a couple of guys from work on Friday.
    11 points
  2. This am is 7 Bear Sunday. Mom w/3 cubs on the side of the house and mom w/2 cubs out back. Mom/2 eventually came into he back yard to clean off the bird feeding area they had already raided earlier. Hoping they do not get together as mom/3 is mean. I have had to break up bear fights a few times over the years. Every day we have either one of these moms with her cubs here but this is one of the rare times they are here at the same time. 617627496_7bearsunday008.MOV1182725054_7bearsunday010.MOV
    4 points
  3. I wondered why we don't see Rocketfoot much sometimes ... now we know
    3 points
  4. Past weekend was dry, warm... Sooooo: barbecue time!! All the new parts that I've received over past months were either not coated, simply oiled or covered with some poor paint. None had of course the kind of finish I had in mind for them. So spend a good part of my saturday cleaning & degreasing them and mask/tape all the parts I could not remove, rubbers, threads etc.. Then just like the restored parts, they did receive a primer, their respective colors and a nice thick finish coat. Sunday was like xmas, lots to unwrap and it was even time to put some stuffs together, install nipples etc... Reassembled the spindles done last weeks with ther hardware plated last year. Installed all back together after a good cleaning and copper greasing of each thread. Was lots of work to get there, zinc plating them was not the easiest thing to do. But now, boy do they not look like a million??! :D Yes these are the same!! :D I know btw I need some wires for their nuts, Anyone have some info on how it should be done the right way? Never done that before, but really would love to have them "twisted" the right secure way. I will buy some SS wire for that asap. Then it was time to put the top arms together... 50 years old and looking goooood :D Then it was time to put all these babies together back into their original nest that is now making a nice contrast with its semi gloss black. Nothing torqued to specs yet until all is on.. Also gave love to the koni's that were plated last year and gave them the car body color (no red), that will look nice into the light grey coils that were done last week... All with all, it was nice to finally see all the work started last novembre come together! The other side fx is that I could get rid of many boxes and create some welcome space. One regret is that the long part that connects both sides (rod assembly, the drag link I think is the name) is still at a friend's place where it needs to go under press to correct the bow into it created at some point when someone jacked up the car with it... No biggy tho, as once I will have the steering box revised, i will need to paint it as well, so will do both at the same time. to be continued...
    3 points
  5. I installed this clip just as directed by Tim- pushing into the hole and with pliers and squeezing the tabs together. Two photos below. From underneath the car and from the footwell:
    3 points
  6. Well, it's been close to 3 months since I've posted an update, but that doesn't mean I haven't been doing anything. I've gotten the instrument cluster back together with LED bulbs installed. I got the steering column painted and reassembled, but the turn signal switch is binding, so I'll have to go back through it, one more time. I got the front and rear seats reupholstered with new foam and seat covers from TMI. Most of the wrinkles seen in the picture were worked out, and overall, the seats look pretty good. I also cut open the top of the new fuel tank and installed the new Tanks, Inc. electric fuel pump. I pretty much did what Autoedit did in the YouTube video, except I used a body saw instead of a hole saw, and oriented the fuel reservoir away from the sending unit to keep it from interfering, but otherwise did pretty much the same. A little work with the hammer and dolly got the lip flattened out and lining up with the sealing ring pretty well. Once the steel retaining ring is placed on the inside edge of the hole and the screws tightened down, it straightens the edge up even better. The retaining ring is installed and the screws inserted to secure it. The Viton washers were removed so that they would not get damaged when the retaining ring was tacked into the opening. After tack welding between each of the screw hole locations, the welds were ground down to make the top flush. Then the tank was cleaned with WD-40 and a magnet, plus wiping it out with some paper towels, and then more WD-40. It was a new tank, but I had gotten from a guy on Facebook marketplace, and there was a little but of crud inside it. It wasn't rust, but I'm not sure what it was. It took a little bit, but I was able to get the tank cleaned out really well. Then, it was time for the gasket sealer, top, and all those screws. Overall, the tank came out really well, and I'm pleased with it. Also, I've kept busy, building a motor for the Rickster. With all the Covid stuff going on, it took a while to get the cylinder heads shipped, but I finally got everything I needed. I had to hit up Don at Ohio Mustang Supply a few times for brackets, etc. since some were missing. I got the Power steering pump and brackets from him. It's a 50 year old pump of unknown history, so I went ahead and rebuilt it. Twice. When they say try not to let the spider come apart, there is a reason for that. My first attempt at reassembly, I got it wrong, and after reinstalling the pump discovered it wouldn't turn very easily. I pulled it all apart, went back through it, and found I had the slippers upside down. DOH!!! After the second or third time putting the spider together, I did develop a feel for it, and it's not difficult, but the first time or two, it can be pretty frustrating. Once reassembled, I double checked and it turned easily, and after installation on the motor, it only required 4 in-lbs of force to turn the pulley, well, within the factory spec of 2-15 in-lbs. Tomorrow, I'll post about the engine build but that's enough for now. Except to say, that the paint shop says the Rickster is very close to done, and should be back in my garage in the next week or so. WooHoo!!! Then the real fun begins - reassembly.
    3 points
  7. Hi Moose That is repairable ... an easy piece of work for me -- but may be fiddly and irritating for someone who's not done it before Its done in the same way I rebuild blown track on Printed Circuit Boards in the electronic systems I deal with at work. I don't disagree - its a painstaking, often irritating job. Clean and lap down the faces where it has blown raised areas with tiny diamond tip of a Dremel (small rotary tool) Clean any copper spatter out of the trenches Get slightly oversized diameter copper wire - remove the enamel and make a piece to fit precisely into your gap Place a tiny drop of nail varnish (Yes ....girlie nail varnish) in the gap (clear is best so you can see the substrate you're working on) With tweezers lay the piece into the gap and let the varnish harden (5mins) Solder each end delicately ("Sodder" in Amercanese ) Then flatten to the same surface height by removing excess copper/sodder with fine diamond dip with Dremel Fine polish with wet/dry emery paper voila - a new track
    3 points
  8. Took him to a show. He got surrounded by a whole bunch of farting little Brit cars and Euro-boxes
    3 points
  9. Nice looking group of steeds!! I like the stance on yours.
    3 points
  10. I'm selling one of my Boss 351s. Please check it out: https://russoandsteele.com/vehicle-details/?show_vehicle=175614&current_index=0&total_results=24&tsauction_id=209&=&caryear=&caryearto=&search_text=&page=featured&showpage=1 It's truly a great car. Please let me know what you think! Thanks for reading.
    3 points
  11. In case you're wondering how the mask wearing guidelines are determined
    2 points
  12. Figured I'd document my ongoing suspension/steering system overhaul here in case anyone is looking at doing something similar. So far I've done: - 12.7:1 quick ratio steering box from Redhead - new pitman arm, idler arm, rag joint, inner tie rods - Baer adjustable outer tie rods for bump steer elimination - 1 1/8" front sway bar - StreetorTrack front coilover conversion And I'm starting on the StreetorTrack rear 3-link suspension install this weekend. This should be considerably more involved than everything else listed above, so on one hand I'm somewhat intimidated by it, but on the other I'm really excited because this is the last suspension component I'm doing other than subframe connectors eventually.
    2 points
  13. Not so much a horror story but they did try to swap parts with me. I was building a flathead V-8 and had a crank that was in great shape and never been ground so .010" grind was all that was needed. I have installed the bearings and measured them and had written down the diameters to grind each journal. I always stamp my initials on any parts I leave anywhere. When I went to pick up the crank they bring out a crank and it has been cut .020" or .030" and is not my crank. I demand mine and they say that is the one I dropped off. We were in the shop and I went to the grind area and pointed to a crank and said that is mine. They said not. I told them that if my initials were stamped on the second crank throw I was taking it. I picked it up and there was D.F.F. stamped so I walked out and never went back there. Always mark your parts in some way to identify them. Grind, etch, stamp but mark them and with today's digital photos take pictures. I have never taken many things for others to work on I have always done most of my work. Anyone that does not get a specific written, signed and even notarized contract is asking for issues. If they will not do that you need to go somewhere else.
    2 points
  14. Cool AMX... NOW back to our regularly scheduled programming... LOL!!
    2 points
  15. Installed a USB charger for the cigarette lighter socket with one of these, no change to the socket and this unit fits tight. Pulled out the threaded bit on the lighter knob and epoxied in a cut down male USB plug. Had to make sure all wires were removed to prevent any short circuit; It's only fractionally longer that the original lighter. Looks ok in place and also has an "on" light on the usb adapter. During my re-wire I changed the lighter to switched power so no chance of being left on.
    2 points
  16. I had taken the engine to the machine shop back in early December. They had said it would take about 2 weeks, which turned into closer to 6 weeks. The owner, I found out, was winding down, moving into retirement, and the shop seemed a bit disorganized, but they had gotten decent reviews. Once I got the motor home, I got it on the engine stand, sprayed it with a generous coating of WD-40, and bagged it. Every couple weeks, I would pull the bag off, spray it with more WD-40, and recover it. After the Rickster went off to paint, it was time to get to work on the motor. I cleaned it, checked it, and then cleaned it again. I checked the crankshaft main bearing clearances with plastigage and all were in spec. I checked the rod bearing clearances with plastigage, as well, and all were right on the money. Great!!! Pistons and rings were installed and everything seemed normal enough. Cam installation was straightforward. I installed a Lunati roller cam and lifters. I got the head gaskets and Trickflow cylinder heads bolted on and torqued. The intake manifold was next and that is where things started going sideways. The intake bolts on the Cleveland, of course, are angled, and the intake must be matched to the head quite precisely. I was having no luck getting them to line up. I determined that the manifold was sitting to high. The block had been decked, but only enough to square it. The machinist couldn't remember exactly how much he had taken off, which I found a little concering. Hmmm. I took the intake manifold to the shop, and they informed me that the Edelbrock Performer 2V intake manifold had been previously milled. We decided that they should take .020 to .030 off each side and see where it sat. In the end, they took off .027 off each side, which was needed to true up one side that was out of square. Great. The intake manifold now sits where it need so the gaskets will seal it properly. Before buttoning it all up, though, I measured for new pushrods, which turned out to be 8.100. Got them ordered figuring it would take the normal 2 days to get here. Eight days later, they arrived, having traveled across much of the USA. Pushrods installed, roller rockers installed and lash set, and finally, the valve cover gaskets can go on. But wait, the rollers are keeping the stock valve covers that I had thoroughly cleaned, removed dents, and painted. The right side actually fit, but the driver side was definitely interfering. New valve covers were ordered and arrived a few days later. I got them intalled, and they fit fine, but seem kind of tall. I am going to use the FAST EZ EFI system, because I have it from an older project that stalled out a few years back. I put the throttle body on the intake and set the ram air cleaner box on it, only to find that it fouled on the valve covers. Soooo, I ordered a 1/2" spacer and now have a maybe 1/4" clearance. With all that sorted, I got the distributor which had a busted vacuum advance nipple, so I got a new vacuum advance for it, I got the tiny clip removed and then the first screw. Both screws were rusty, but the first one came out okay, taking my time and using penetrating oil and heat. The second screw decided to just wring off about halfway down the hole. I tried to drill it out, but the drill bit broke off, so I have been fighting the thing fixed for 6 or 7 weeks now. I took it to a local machine shop, but they were too backed up to help me out. They did tell me, though, that the machine shop had done the machine work on the block had had a lot of problems with quality control lately, and had ruined a few blocks and cylinder heads. I felt okay about the crank and rod bearing clearances, but hadn't checked the bores. Soooo, off comes the intake, valve cover, rockers and pushrods, cylinder heads, etc. I got out the dial bore gauge and micrometer, and measured each bore at the bottom, just above the piston, middle of the run and at the top of the bore, front to back, and side to side. Six measurements on each cylinder. Each cylinder was pretty uniform, with the 48 measurements ranging from 4.03035 to 4.03102. Most of the cylinders were within about .00030 to .00040, although some of that can be just variation inherent in measuring the diameter of a cylinder. I am satisfied, though, that they didn't screw it up, so I got new intake manifold gaskets, and got the motor put back together, once again. Back to the distributor, I finally found a machine shop that said they might be about to repair it, so I'm hoping that in the next few days, I'll get good news from them. Then I can get the distributor rebuilt, and installed. I did look into a new Pertronix billet distributor, but it didn't fit under the air box. I just found that they do make shorter Pertronix distributors, but at this point, I'm waiting for the machine shop. So that is my engine building saga. Thanks to Don at Ohio Mustang for helping me out with AC and power steering brackets. It's coming together, slowly, but surely. Hopefully, the Rickster will be back soon, and we can get that motor filling the engine bay.
    2 points
  17. My intention this weekend was to dig my back window out of my closet and get it ready for install. Instead I did the throttle cable and charcoal canister .
    2 points
  18. Motor came apart today. He found one bad rod bearing, said the crank measured out fine and will just get polished up. Out of an abundance of caution, he's disassembling the engine, performing a complete inspection and will clean out all the oil passages. He's a bit baffled by the bearing failure, but agrees it must have happened on the dyno. Told him that I had to adjust #3 intake, even though he had run through the valves several times, so a thorough inspection of the cam in lifters is also in order. If there is even the least bit of suspicion about them, they'll be replaced.
    2 points
  19. Hi.it's been a little while. A couple things.I did figure out how to keep the coil springs in the front of the car.I am currently working on those parts and of course will post pics when I am done. I took a little break from the car because the spring thing was driving me nuts. I'm one of those people that will work till the point of mental exhaustion to figure out a solution to a problem.But in the two weeks that I really didn't touch the car. I bought a 73 AMX,360, 4speed, Go Pack car,that's eventually going to become the street car my Mach1 was going to be.And while messing with the AMX I got over the mental block I had with the Mustang.So when I get the coil spring maker not falling outters installed I will be moving on to the wheel flares.So here is the AMX.I don't think anybody on here will mind one little ole pic of an AMC....................oh ya...........NO Trans Am mods to the AMX ,I promise.
    2 points
  20. Test fitting everything today. A couple of things I've noticed. 1: the gas tank straps are going to have to to in before the watts bar as it looks like the bar sits right beneath them. 2: not going to be able to use the factory brake line support bracket as the 3rd link bar needs to go where it is. Going to have to do some creative brake line rerouting. Next step is to take out the pinion snubber plate that's welded in the transmission tunnel with a spot weld drill, then I can actually bolt the watts bar and 3rd link bar to the frame.
    2 points
  21. If you gently apply pressure to to gas pedal as the car rolls forward the ash tray cover won't slide open. So, obviously, the issue you are inquiring about involve two things. The first mechanical issue is the forces of gravity exerted on the lid and the second mechanical issue your ash tray lid suffers from is called the "Hauling Ass Syndrome", which activates the aforementioned first issue causing it to slide violently open and is a very common problem most of the ash tray covers in our cars, suffer from.
    2 points
  22. I installed new rear axle seals and brakes. Thankfully the rear bearings were good so I didn't need to replace them. Rear drum brakes are something I really don't enjoy doing. It is a very messy job and even with the right brake tools I always end up struggling with a spring or retainer. A scrape or cut on one hand or the other just add to the experience. I am happy to have the job behind me. Tomorrow I dig into the heater core replacement. After researching what is involved to get to the heater core I suspect I going to find I prefer working on rear brakes...
    2 points
  23. No only a younger brother. I have been asked that question many time.
    2 points
  24. The parts fairy made a visit today. Two new top cylinders installed, first pass at rim blow rebuild.
    2 points
  25. That's what many call the "while I'm at it's" or project creep. We started with leaking air shocks and the correct solution is a new set of shocks and springs. Now we have introduced changing the rear sway bar into the picture. Project creep. I'm a firm believer in incremental suspension upgrades, to get it to where it was when new, and upgrade from there. Your existing baseline for this car is in the negative - a completely worn out system. New leaf springs, shackles and shocks will make a tremendous improvement in how the car rides and handles, couple that with poly bushings in the sway bar end links and frame brackets, and it's a whole 'nother car.
    2 points
  26. There’s only one bar that fits a car with competition suspension, which is the .875 or the 7/8” one. The .75, 3/4” bar is for cars without competition suspension. Cars without the comp. suspension have both shocks on the same side of the axle.
    2 points
  27. Takes after grandpas beer belly 😂
    2 points
  28. I went low tech, Krylon Fusion metallic Aluminum and to me looks just fine next to the argent stripe
    2 points
  29. Well, today I moved to the other end of the powertrain. I removed the factory 2.75 one-wheeler-peeler and installed a new 3.81 Eaton Truetrac rear end that I purchased from Quick Performance. First I pulled the axles. Here's what the diff looks like after 48 years. I spent more time removing the old gasket that all the rest of the job combined! Since the new gasket ran me $20!!, I figured it deserved a photo of it's own: And now the finished install. Damn was it heavy. Heavier than the Tremec transmission. Tomorrow I plan to tackle the rear brakes, install new axle seals, and put the rear end back together so I can lower the car and measure for the new driveshaft.
    2 points
  30. Sport lamps are in the grill, the one below the bumper are running and turn signal lights.
    1 point
  31. I have a fair library of manuals and "how to" books. Some repops, some originals. The 71, 68 & 65 are reproductions, the rest are originals. The 71 & 68 I bought ages ago from Mustangs Unlimited. The 65 I bought last year from Rock Auto and it's a Detroit Iron publication. Quality is excellent and the paper is good, heavy stock. They have the 73 manual set for $60. The only caveat there is it's missing Volume 6, the one with the emissions and vacuum diagrams. RA also sells the Dave Graham reproductions, which I've heard terrible reviews on, as they supposedly have huge watermarks. I recently bought a Detroit Iron digital manual for the 73s and it's pretty darn good for $20. It's also missing volume 6, but does have the complete dealer service department wiring diagrams. FWIW, the Haynes V8 Mustang manual is worth the $20 as a good reference piece. Try to find a used one with the 72 Mach 1 cutaway on the cover, as it has the heavier paper stock, not the newsprint they use today.
    1 point
  32. I would recommend Oilite Bronze bushings similar to these, but if I remember in 3/8" ID. I replaced all the plastic bushing with Oillite bronze, but some work is needed for a correct fit. The result is a much smoother clutch operation and less effort. Oilite Bushing.pdf
    1 point
  33. So, the originals look to be 4x8, not 4x6. I may change my mind, I found these on amazon https://www.amazon.com/RetroSound-R-483N-Stereo-Replacement-Speaker/dp/B00QXWHLH4/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=4x8%2Bspeakers&qid=1627614169&sr=8-1&th=1
    1 point
  34. Ok both the watts bar and 3rd link bar are bolted to the frame rails now. The watts bar slid over the frame rails no problem, but I did have some difficulty getting the 3rd link bar fully seated - it was about 1/8" too narrow as you can see from the first pic. Emailed Shaun at StreetorTrack and he said that's typical as some cars will have wider or narrower set frame rails than others, and to use a dead blow hammer to get it lined up. I will say the step bolts they gave you use to bolt everything up are pretty intuitive. They have you drill a 1/2" hole on the outboard side of your frame rails, and a 3/8" hole on the inboard side, so that the step bolt can effectively clamp both sides of the frame rails. Let's you torque them on pretty tight without worrying about warping anything.
    1 point
  35. I don't think the VIN has been filed or ground off. I think the assembly line worker whose job it was to stamp the partial VIN was hung over and hitting the stamps hard with the hammer reverberated through his or her head, or maybe was using a rubber mallet to keep the noise down
    1 point
  36. F is Dearborn. Torinos and Thunderbirds also had the 429 in 1971. They were called Thunderjet in the Thunderbirds.
    1 point
  37. Now I wonder why I like that colour
    1 point
  38. If you know a veterinarian you might want to borrow a pair of their shoulder length rubber gloves and wear a rain coat and face shield. No matter how long you let it set and drip dry you'll still get rained on by fluid when you start removing screws and nuts on the valve body.
    1 point
  39. I removed the heater/AC box and replaced the heater core. As it turns out the job was pretty straight forward and not as difficult as I had anticipated from my research. I followed the steps in the Ford Shop Manual. First I removed the carpet. I am installing new carpet anyway and figured I'd need every inch of room to drop the box. The floor was in real good shape. Next I laid out a sheet of craft paper on a table. Not knowing what all parts I would be removing I labeled everything on the table as I removed things. If I am not going to be immediately reassembling something I am careful to bag and label, but if I know I am immediately putting everything back together I find the table labeling method to be more convenient. The box was in real good shape. No internal signs of leakage. No critter nests. No cracks or chips. Of particular note. I did not have to remove the dash. (the Ford manuals confirm this). By removing the footwell side trim and the carpet and padding I had just enough room to pull the box right and rotate it out from under the dash. Other than removing the glove box and door no other disassembly was necessary. Here's a photo of the box prior to disassembly. And here it is torn down. I did buy a seal kit and replaced all the foam when I put the box back together. I also spent the extra $15 to buy a non-aluminum heater core. I have not had good luck with aluminum cores as they do not appear to hold up over time. I did check the new core for leaks (as suggested by David w Carolina Mountain Mustangs) prior to installation. I removed the A/C evaporator since it is no longer needed. Since moving to North Idaho from Florida I find there is really no need for air conditioning and I have removed the compressor and other A/C equipment from the engine bay to give me more room. The box went back in even easier than it came out. I'd say the whole job start to finish took about four leisurely hours. Having done the job once now I could probably do it again in about half the time. All in all not the horror story I was anticipating.
    1 point
  40. Item purchased thread closed thanks to Mike at Motorcity Mustang
    1 point
  41. Got the rest of the frame jig finished. Got it all measured out and welded down per the factory specs. And then I broke out the old torch and cut the front clip off. Still need to wire wheel everything and drill out spot welds but got a lot done today. Here’s a few pics of the progress.
    1 point
  42. Traction bars will help the spring wrap on acceleration and keep the differential pointed ahead instead of up.
    1 point
  43. One word of caution from my own personal experience, do NOT buy Grab-A-Trak springs. I bought the 4 1/2 leaf in an attempt to stop the rear axle wrap-up I was getting. They actually raised the rear end too much and for me, looked stupid. I made a set of lowering blocks hoping they would settle to where I could take them out, but no. I'll not go over this again, but I ended up scrapping them in favor of Eaton Boss springs. The cost reflect the quality. There are a few "types" of steel used for springs, but trust me, the cheap ones are NOT 5160 spring steel. Some claim to be 4140 which is a semi hard steel used in some tool and die areas. It is not a spring steel. I suspect if they are made in India, you're getting steel from a cut up ship, who knows! Bottom line, I paid twice as much if not more because I bought new springs TWICE!! NPD also sell Eaton springs.
    1 point
  44. Decided since I live on the coast and am making a driver I should protect the tank seems how the yellow parts car tank I had was completely rusted I figured I should be proactive. ill be installing it soon! also here’s Weston looking sharp
    1 point
  45. if anything I probably used adhesion promoter like this https://www.autozone.com/paint-and-body/primer/p/rust-oleum-base-adhesion-promoter-primer-spray-11oz/379798_0_0?cmpid=LIA:US:EN:AD:NL:1000000:GEN:71700000069889792&gclid=Cj0KCQjw0emHBhC1ARIsAL1QGNdPSEVeFt90povFCZhPkZrQfJ_Bjz-uyU3CvKzwUXfMaSoc_qbRT7saAo0lEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
    1 point
  46. Some good info on the engine's evolution... The greatest cars powered by Ford's Cleveland V8 (msn.com)
    1 point
  47. LOL Thanks for the laugh. If I send you a dollar will you throw it away?
    1 point
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