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phagan63

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Vehicle Info

  • My Car
    73 Mustang convertible w/ slightly beefed up 302 & C4 trans

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  • Location
    NE Florida
  • Region
    Southeast

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  • Sex
    Male

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  1. I'm certainly no expert on these things but just about every article I've read concerning drum to disc conversions, and I've read a bunch because I did the conversion on my 67 F100 a few years ago, advises installing the proper proportioning valve for front disc/rear drum applications. Some articles state that you can keep the original distribution block but should add an adjustable proportioning valve for the rear brakes. I just went ahead and removed the original block and installed the appropriate proportioning valve. This may not be the source of your current problem but in my humble opinion, it's probably something you should consider in the near future. I'm not sure what dangers might exist, if any, by not having that specific component. Maybe some of the other more experienced forum members might have some thoughts on this.
  2. In my instance, yes it did because the fluid was leaking out of the cylinder. I didn't realize it until I actually crawled back there and looked and saw the back plate was a little damp. I think it's possible for them to leak internally without any obvious indication showing on the outside. what would be a way to check it? just remove it and inspect it? +1 on that. Had the same symptoms described in the original post and it was a leaking rear wheel cylinder. mike interesting. i think ill have to really check them out. This is scary and it sucks :/ "what would be a way to check it? just remove it and inspect it?" I'd start with the easiest and move toward the more complex. Get up under the car and behind the rear wheels where you can see the the back plate of the drum assemblies and look for any signs of dampness. If you can't, pull the rear wheels off and look from that perspective. If it still looks dry I guess the next step is to pull the drums themselves off and inspect each wheel cylinder. After that ... I'm not sure because I found my problem before I got that far. Good luck to you. Hope it turns out to be something simple. I was just thinking some more about your problem and a question came to my mind. You said you converted from front drum to front disc brakes. I'm sure the conversion was done correctly but sometimes little things slip past us. Did that conversion include a new proportioning valve ? I didn't read anywhere in your original post if you had changed out the original distribution block with the proper proportioning valve. If by chance you didn't, this could be the source of your problems. Just a thought.
  3. Greetings from Northeast Florida :)
  4. the rear hoses were replaced with steel braided hoses about 5 years ago and the fronts when i changed my front brakes Hmmm. I am pretty sure they arent warped (i hope not :s) i will have to check them out, but the wheels are one tight and torqued I'm sorry if it wasnt clear, but yes still drums in the rear. Did the leaky wheel cylinders cause brake fluid to waste? In my instance, yes it did because the fluid was leaking out of the cylinder. I didn't realize it until I actually crawled back there and looked and saw the back plate was a little damp. I think it's possible for them to leak internally without any obvious indication showing on the outside.
  5. I didn't notice in your post ... Do you still have drums on the back ? If you do make sure to check for leaking wheel cylinders back there. I had the same issue with my 67 F100 when I converted to front discs. I kept thinking I screwed up the installation somehow. After going through all the possible problems the front brakes might have had, I finally went to the back and inspected everything. Wound up being a bad wheel cylinder on one of the back drums.
  6. "and ceased being available sometime around 1957-58" Not sure if you meant they weren't widely available at that particular time, but they are still around today and legal in some states depending on the vehicle. Found in latest edition of LMC truck catalog ::huh::: Not my words - hence "from the 'net" I just captured some related text and posted. Nice you found it - I'd bet you can buy them on ebay too. I can't see a demand for them to be utilized on our cars. I like the LED look (discussed and being developed in another thread) much better for a cool modded tailight. Ray Sorry Ray. Didn't mean to attribute that statement to you. I missed the "from the net" you included at the beginning. I have a 67 Ford F100 that I've been tinkering with for several years so I have my nose in the LMC catalog quite a bit. When I read that statement in your post I immediately remembered seeing those little things listed in it.
  7. "and ceased being available sometime around 1957-58" Not sure if you meant they weren't widely available at that particular time, but they are still around today and legal in some states depending on the vehicle. Found in latest edition of LMC truck catalog
  8. +1! Though I never planned on doing so, I stuck a green 1975 New Hampshire front plate on mine (FL is a rear-tag only state). Not only does it nearly match the color of the car, but the width of the tag visually reinforces the recess between the NACA hood scoops. That, and a period tag on the front just seems to help take the visual aspect of the car back to it's era. I never cared for those stylized model year plates or "FORD RACING/MUSTANG" novelty tags. Too kitsch. -Kurt Florida will also allow you to use a period correct FL license plate as your legal registered plate. It's a bit of a process requiring you to mail the plate as well as the application to Tallahassee, for what reason I'm not sure, and then they'll send it back to you all legal like. I have a 73 license plate, just haven't gone through the process yet.
  9. Florida allows "blue dots" on cars over 25 years old and on "custom built vehicles" and "street rods". Motorcycles aren't specifically included or excluded. I kinda agree with Kit on this one though. IMO, the design of our tail lights doesn't lend itself well to adding blue dots.
  10. I don't have the True Trac in mine but I'm definitely considering a change. Presently I have a Detroit Locker in the 8" and 3.08 gears. No doubt, in a straight line the car really moves out. That is until I get up to about 70-75 mph. By then, because it has a C4, the motor is screaming and I can actually watch the needle on my fuel gauge move. Not by the mile, but by the yard ! (Maybe a little exaggeration, but just a little). I really don't care for all the little "noises" it makes during normal driving either. I can't help but feel as though any minute I'm going to see parts rolling in the street in my rear view mirror. I'm told by people with more experience than myself that these noises and related little "bumps" and "clunks" are normal but I find it a little unsettling. Sometimes I think I'd prefer going back to the stock configuration. After all, I'm not interested in racing the car. I just want to be able to leisurely tool around town with the top down, and/or take that run down I-95 to visit the old man, on a regular basis :)
  11. My wife drives a 2004 Ram 1500 with the 4.7 . Even though we've recently had to do a few repairs, after about 160,000 miles, it's still a great truck to drive. With-in the past year we've had to replace a blown head gasket, have the rear differential rebuilt and replace all the control arms and ball joints. We just put a new set of tires on it last week. I'm hoping that'll take care of it for a little while so I can start spending money on the Mustang again. Good news is she purrs like a kitten (the truck, not the wife) and we don't have to make payments on her (again, the truck, not the wife).
  12. I have/had the same problem recently as well. Only my "shimmy" felt like it was coming from the front of the car. On the sage advice of some of the forum members, I started with having the wheels and tires rebalanced. Even though they were new wheels and tires just recently installed, the tire shop showed me that all of them were out of balance to some degree. After the balancing was complete, it definitely improved the vibration condition but there is still a little bit there ... just not as intense as before. Next step for me is the idler arm because it appears to be worn (visible torn boot). So ... After doing all the visual inspections described by the other replies, if you can't find anything obvious, definitely start with a rebalance of your wheels and tires.
  13. Great story ! It's really wonderful that you were able to do that for your dad. I can only wish for the talent and/or resources to do something like that for my loved ones. I hope that whatever issue that has brought your dad into hospice will run it's course quickly and release him from any further suffering. May any pain endured by you and your family as a consequence also pass as quickly.
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