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Flatback72

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Everything posted by Flatback72

  1. I love the retro look clean look of the dog dish hubcaps, if it were my car I would keep them on!
  2. JimNiki and Luxstang are back....well I'll be darned, the ol' gang is back together again! You didn't see URUGUAYAN_FASTBACK on your travels did you, I always wondered what happened to that guy.......
  3. Where did the tutorials in "Aesthetics, Interior and Exterior" go to ?
  4. Pretty sure nobody has to believe this, looks fairly fake to me. Why would a car that's been set fire to at the gas filler start exploding first under the hood and then fly backwards like it's rocket powered?
  5. Kind sir, as an Australian I take exception to the serious misinformation presented here :chin: We do not ride crocodiles and get chased by funnel web spiders, we ride crocodiles to hunt down funnel web spiders. I'm a pom ... :poke: waddya expect me to say ::tease:: :P Well, you are welcome to come to Australia any time the wildlife starts to get out of control, your ecky-thump skills would come in handy during such circumstances. On a side note, about three weeks ago I had my Mustang parked for a while in the open backed garage on the side of my house rather than the usual lock up garage at the back. The side garage is open somewhat to the elements. I got in the car and while the door was still open a 3 inch Huntsman similar to the one pictured scarpered up from the bottom of the door panel and ran back outside over the top of the door. I surmised it had been hiding in the gap at the bottom of the door, as these particular spiders are predisposed to do. They are rather gentle giants and nonpoisonous (or so it is said), but still I would rather not share my car with any arachnids given the choice.
  6. Kind sir, as an Australian I take exception to the serious misinformation presented here :chin: We do not ride crocodiles and get chased by funnel web spiders, we ride crocodiles to hunt down funnel web spiders.
  7. I'm assuming the fences around the trees are there to either stop horse munching on the trees, or to stop horse carts from hitting the trees, or both. Here's another one that I've just finished adding color to from 1875, and how it looks now:
  8. Ok, with some help from google streetview I am able to put up now and then comparison pics! Year 1857 1870's, same location as the photo above The above two photo's now: 1870's The above photo now: 1870's The above photo now: 1870's The above photo now: 1870's The above photo now: 1870's The above photo now: 1870's The above photo now: between 1870 to 1890 (photo taken from the poppet head of the next photo down) The above photo now: This gold mine was in the main street in the middle of town until just after the WW1, when they replaced it with a war memorial building. The shaft is still there, capped and directly underneath the newer building. The above photo now: 1930's. The soldiers memorial spoken of above is the first building on the left. The above photo now: A couple of old timer (Bendigonians) hanging around in front of the War Memorial in 1940 The above photo now: Bendigo's main street (Pall Mall) in the 1930's The above photo now (we've still got our 125 year old tramway, now for tourists): 1920's or 1930's The above photo now: 1890 The above photo now: 1945 The above view now: 1952 The above photo now: 1930's The above photo now:
  9. I've been spending time adding colour to old black & white photo's of my hometown, Bendigo (Victoria, Australia) to add to our local Facebook history page. Bendigo was founded out of the gold rush of 1851 and the Bendigo fields have produce over 700,000kg (154300 lbs) of gold between 1851-1954 which would be worth about $30 billion AUD in today's prices. More than 5,000 registered gold mines were formed within an area of 4km x 16km. At least 140 shafts exceeded 300 metres in depth, 67 exceeded 600 metres and 11 were over 1,000 metres (3280 feet) deep and represents the largest concentration of deep shafts anywhere in the world. The largest gold nugget, the Welcome Stranger, was found 60 kilometers from Bendigo in a town called Dunolly. Looking at the Bendigo photographic record I am seeing parallels to the imagery of America's wild west. Here are some of the Bendigo images that I've added colour to and these are the streets that my Mustang now prowls around on all the time (or at least it did back in the good ol' pre-plague days when we were allowed to drive for enjoyment!) Year 1857 1870's, same location as the photo above 1870's 1870's 1870's 1870's 1870's 1870's between 1870 to 1890 (photo taken from the poppet head of the next photo down) This gold mine was in the main street in the middle of town until just after the WW1, when they replaced it with a war memorial building. The shaft is still there, capped and directly underneath the newer building. 1930's. The soldiers memorial spoken of above is the first building on the left. A couple of old timer (Bendigonians) hanging around in front of the War Memorial in 1940 Bendigo's main street (Pall Mall) in the 1930's 1920's or 1930's 1890 1945 1952
  10. Well that's an attention getter, I like it!
  11. Can somebody order a Muddy Report for this one so we can see what options it has?
  12. Thanks for posting the pics of your conversion jpaz, it's great to see some pictorial feedback that my tutorial has been useful ! I think this is one of the coolest mods that can be done to a 7173 fastback; it really is unfathomable to understand why Ford decided to delete the fastback hand crank option. Perhaps they thought that it was an incentive to get people to pony up with some more cash to buy the electric four window option instead?
  13. One of my front side maker globes has packed it in for the first time since owning the car. Not sure if the socket is a twist out type or just a direct pull-out type. I've tried both methods but the little mongrel won't pop out, frozen in by time and entropy I guess. But I didn't put too much pressure on it either twisting or pulling, because not knowing which method for extraction then I would sure to be using the wrong method with the extra pressure and would break something. So which is it, twist or yank?
  14. I agree, this is the most awesome 84 Firebird I have ever seen!
  15. It's a good thing that you have rubber hose on the studs to protect the threads from damage.
  16. First car I wish I'd kept was my 1970 Mach 1, bought it in 1987 when I was 21, but sold it about 5 years later to get money to go towards buying a house. Second car I wish I'd kept, and by far my greatest regret, was my 1975 XB Fairmont Coupe (i.e. mad max model). I bought this one for three grand just before I sold my Mach 1, just to keep my interest going in big V8 coupes as it was only 1/5 of the price that I sold the Mustang for. It had a 302 Cleveland (yes there is such a thing in Australia as a 302C) and I had it stroked to a 351 and it went like a rocket. As I got a bit older I had a penchant for some luxury so I bought a 1992 Ford Fairlane sedan and sold the XB Coupe off my front lawn for $2200 in 1998. Hardly anyone wanted these big coupes then. The same car today would bring about $30,000 - $40,000 here in Australia. I'm kicking myself because I had the room to store it away, but just didn't want it getting in the way. Every now and again I'd have dreams that I managed somehow to get this car back and I'd be stoked, but then I'd wake up and silently curse in mewling disappointment! I only really got over the XB Coupe when I bought my 1972 Mustang, which in my eyes trumps both the other cars in every way. Lower, sleeker and more awesomely garish than both the other cars put together, I've learned my lessons very well now so I won't be letting anybody take this particular car off me until the day they cart me off in a box! Oh yeah, I almost forgot, I would love my first car back that I bought in 1984. It was a 1974 Celica. I don't really regret selling it because it made the way for some much more awesome cars, however there were a lot of good memories surrounding this little hotrod so if I ever got the chance I'd buy this one back in a heartbeat.
  17. I used a large 3D printer to make my '72 Sportsroof, however there were structural problems with the 3D printed car and it broke in half on the first drive and killed me. But I was ok the next day.
  18. That missing Export Brace between the shock towers and the firewall could be a problem couldn't it ? My understanding is that if a car spends time driving without it then the shock towers can collapse inwards somewhat ? It's a nice looking car though if you ask me; if it was for sale here in Australia the asking price would be around $25000.
  19. It's a charcoal canister. Quoting from https://www.cars.com/auto-repair/glossary/charcoal-canister/: "Part of the car’s emissions controls, this charcoal-filled canister’s job is to absorb fuel vapor that would otherwise vent out to the atmosphere, causing pollution. Vapors trapped by the charcoal are released back into the engine through the purge valve and then burned."
  20. Definitely a button for the ejector seat. Look for a concave dent in the roof area above the drivers position to determine whether or not it has been used.
  21. Well 1sostatic, you did pretty good with the Aussie slang, but here's a more accurate rendition of the example above using some Aussie phrasing: "Gunna chuck a sickie, say hooroo to the oldies and bugger off up to the back of Bourke with me mates to hoon around in the scrub . I'll take a shrewd guess that we're all gunna get as dry as a dead dingo's donger, so we'll load up the Ute with an Esky fulla stubbies and cheap plonk; me and me mates'll sink so many coldies that we'll have a real rip-snorter of a time and be magotted by mid-arvo." Just in case our International colleagues can't make any sense of the Aussie, here is my attempt at a UK translation of the phrases above: "I am going to politely excuse myself from my daily occupational activity, say a delightful cheerio to Mother Dearest and Father, and take the Bentley up to Cornwall with the dapper chaps from the croquet club where we will no doubt participate in some playful high spirited capering amongst the bracken. I will make a polite but informed guess that a strong thirst may arise, causing our lower facial cavities to forthwith become as dry as an Englishman's bath-towel; therefore we will ensure that Sir Henry's lorry is capaciously furnished for the expedition with lashings of Newcastle's Brownest Warm Ale. We shall perhaps imbibe far too much of these fine spirits that by the equinox of the afternoon we shall indeed all be giggling flirtatiously like giddy rosy-cheeked Winchester College schoolgirls...."
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