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turtle5353

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turtle5353 last won the day on September 12

turtle5353 had the most liked content!

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Vehicle Info

  • My Car
    1971 Mach 1 Mustang

Location

  • Location
    PA
  • Region
    Northeast

Personal Information

  • Sex
    Male

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turtle5353's Achievements

  1. lol!! Good luck. I have removed many of those over the years. Piss poor design. Steering wheels are nice but their horn set up blows!!!
  2. +1 on what Geoff said. We had several Petronix 3 go bad on my parents 66. Put in the original ignitor 1 and had 0 issues since. Also the duraspark systems work great too, I installed them in several cars over the years.
  3. +1 on The Sem hot rod black. I used it and its seems to be really nice paint.
  4. Aren’t you a crafty SOB. Nice job on the jig. Simple but effective!
  5. Thanks Guys. Not getting too much done last couple days....been working a bunch of OT at work and still have to work more OT this weekend. So when I get an open chance to hit the garage, I go. I did start cleaning and prepping the motor for a quick paint touch up. Nothing fancy. Hopefully have that finished up tonight or tomorrow. As far as the epoxy primer, my buddy used it in his car and its held up really nicely over the years. But yes, if it is exposed to UV light it can fade and get that chalky look, but being that its under the hood, there should be little to no UV light exposure. Epoxy primer is also pretty much nonporous unlike normal primer. And it holds up fairly decent to chemicals. My buddy said when his gets dirty or anything he wipes it down with a cloth and a little bit of mineral spirits and it looks new again. When i do my car this winter I will be doing the exact same thing. Way more durable then anything out of a rattle can and the sheen is almost perfect.
  6. I believe those ones have you drill a hole in your existing pedal at a higher point up and mount a new pin. I’m not 100% sure but that’s what I remember reading.
  7. Where the butt welds will be is up to you. If you're not comfortable with butt welds or if you don't mind lap joints, then technically you could replace the floor pans with no butt welds. Just overlap the new pan about 1" and punch holes around the perimeter and plug weld it into place, then seam seal everything. The spots weld you will have to drill out will be on the floor supports/frame rails. If you overlap the toe board it isn't necessary to drill out the spot welds. Same with the floor to rocker joint. If you are reusing your seat risers then you need to drill those spot weld out carefully. If your replacing the seat risers, then cut them out and discard. If you don't want to drill all the spot welds out, there's an easy trick to help speed up the process. Cut the floor pan out close to frame rail, rocker, toe kick, ect. Leave a strip of the metal with the spot welds. Then go back with a grinder and grind the spot welds down very thin. Then go back in with an air chisel and nice sharp chisel bit and get between the rails and pop the spot welds loose. The floor pan is much thinner than the frame and you are less likely to damage the base material with the air chisel. But be careful, it can get away from you in a hurry. But its only metal and you can always weld her back up!
  8. A lot of times I cover the windows with that thick brown packing/wrapping paper. It deflects sparks nicely. But yes, you need to be careful the sparks can mess glass up pretty easily.
  9. Hey there’s nothing wrong with 500+ hp to go get ice cream!! Lol. Thats where my car gets drove most.
  10. Got the shock tower covers on. Wheels on. And got the car cut off frame jig! She’s a roller again. Getting closer!!!
  11. If you’re doing one side at a time and the car is on its wheels you should be ok. I don’t think you would need any extra bracing. I changed mine 1 at a time without anything moving. Just be careful when cutting them out that you don’t cut into the floor support or torque box. Other than that it’s pretty straightforward. Lay your new pan in, trace around it and cut out old pan. Leave a nice 1” lip or so if you are doing a lap joint. If you are doing a butt weld , I would zip screw new pan in place and use a body saw and cut through both pieces for a perfect fit. I usually cut a few big hunks of the floor out first to get some of the stuff out of the way before fitting. Pretty easy job if you take your time.
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