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turtle5353

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Everything posted by turtle5353

  1. If it’s oil canning, I have had good luck with drilling a hole or two in center of oil can. 1/4” hole will do. Then weld the hole shut and cool it quickly with a wet rag. That should shrink it and tighten up the metal.
  2. AWESOME! I love these video updates. Keep up the great work. That's going to be one sweet ride when its done.
  3. Speedmaster heads and valve train parts are junk. If you run those you will likely destroy a lot of your motor in a short amount of time. If you decide to keep the heads I would at the very least swap out the valves and springs. They are cheap Chinese junk. Speed master is Procomp under a new name. Same cheap stuff different name.
  4. Wow! That's green for sure! Looks great!
  5. You should be able to keep the staggered shocks. You just need to cut the mounts off the stock spring u bolt plates. The axle 8.8 is a different size tube than the 9 inch. That’s why you need to transfer the shock mounts to new flat steel plate. I will look around for some pics but I can’t find any at the moment. I may be able to go out this weekend and get a couple.
  6. No I don’t. I have standard shocks. I took out factory u-bolt plates/ shock mounts and cut off the angled part that mounts the shock. I then welded that angled piece to a piece of 1/4” steel plate and drill holes in it for my u-bolts. The shop that made my driveshaft also custom made u-bolts too.
  7. I haven’t had any problems with c clips with mine. I have been running around 600hp through over the last few years and no issues. Brake pedal is always good. The one thing you will want to do is weld the axles tubes to the center section. They are pressed in from factory and can twist if not welded.
  8. I have had my 8.8 in my mustang for probably 13-14 years. I love it. You can pick them up cheap from wrecking yard easily for $150 or less. Get the driveshaft too. I took explorer rear section of drive shaft and front section of my mustang driveshaft and had a driveshaft shop make me a custom driveshaft. Definitely worth the time and money to do this swap. The ranger station .com is good place for 8.8 info too.
  9. I don’t see sh@t. But I’m using my phone with safari. But I don’t see anything.
  10. I’m just north of Pittsburgh and we got almost a foot of snow dumped on us Wednesday/Thursday.
  11. My car is also a 302/c4 Mach 1. It now has a 408 Cleveland stroker but still has the old C4.
  12. Probably a blessing in disguise. That thing looks like it was starting to rot pretty good from the inside out. It may be possible to replace with motor still in car but would be much easier with it out. Once motor is out it’s a pretty straight forward repair. Make sure whoever welds it in knows what they are doing. That’s a very big structural member. Not difficult but pretty time consuming.
  13. Here’s a few pics of the jambs I shot on a 71. And tail light panel. I measured the original black out on this car and copied it exactly. But if I remember correctly in 72 they changed how far in the jamb the black goes.
  14. To be honest, I never like shooting the jambs first and then the rest of the car. Many many people do it that way but its just not my preference. I like to shoot the shell itself. And I shoot the doors, fenders, hood and trunk separate. I like this way because then all your bolts and striker plates don't get paint all over them. Looks much more professional and nice. Always bugs me when door latches and strikers and bolts are painted that aren't supposed to be painted. Both ways has it advantages and disadvantages. If you do have to let the car sit for a time before paint, I would shoot it
  15. No it should be fine as long as your not cutting quarter panels off at same time.
  16. Also another quick tip, when you strike an arc, start it on the new piece of metal and then whip it over to the the old metal. The new metal is usually thicker and can take the initial arc of the wire better.
  17. I would recommend getting the old metal much cleaner. I use a 1/4' air angle grinder with 3M 2" roloc grinding wheels in 36 grit for grinding welds down or 50 grit for cleaning old metal. Your old metal has to be shiny new looking or you will contaminate the weld. Also you want to ditch the .030 wire and get some .023. The .030 is too big for sheetmetal work. The heat it takes to properly melt the wire usually will distort or burn through old thin sheet metal. Since it looks like you are running the smaller 140 machine it will definitely benefit you to run the smaller wire. Do not try to
  18. Looks like the fender could use rolled down. Don't be afraid to massage it a bit with hammer and dolly. You may need to work the fender and door both.
  19. This stage is the worst of any restoration project. You wont have fingerprints left on your hands and your arms will be ready to fall off after all the block sanding. BUT, it will soon be worth all the effort. Keep up the great work.
  20. Did a little work on a nice 97 F150. Patched bed and chipguard bottom.
  21. My buddy is a retired Ford master tech. He can rebuild the old tranny’s in his sleep. I have had him do several over the years.
  22. +1 on what Hemikiller said. I had my c-4 built probably 14-15 years ago. It has been behind a stock 302, mildly built 351C with 400hp, and a 408C stroker with close to 600hp. I got all my parts from Broader Transmissions. https://broaderperformance.com/ They are top notch guys. Highly recommend their valve bodies. I got my torque converter from B&M. Its a 3,000 stall unit. Works great. As far as the 8" rear end goes I ran mine for a couple years behind my 302 and 351C. It seemed to do just fine. Mine was only 3.00 gears. So instead of doing a gear swap, I swapped in a ford 8.8"
  23. I forgot to post up some pics of the finished basement. I just got the banister finished today. It came out pretty good.
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