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MotoArts

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MotoArts last won the day on December 27 2016

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Vehicle Info

  • My Car
    '71 Sportsroof
    '90 Mustang 7-Up 5.0 ragtop (sold after 20 years)
    '66 Sunbeam Tiger Mk.IA

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  • Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
  • Region
    Northeast

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  1. I haven't checked on this subject in quite a while... Wondering if there have been any introductions of new headers for TJ applications in the past few years. I live in Pittsburgh, and that pretty much rules out low slung tubes like the Hookers or Crites due to the mine fields and corn rows that they pass for roads here. I would actually prefer mid length, but have not read any consistent info regarding *perfect* fitment of the FPA's. My combo is a mid 70's Lincoln 460 with C8 heads. It has not been installed in my car to check fitment of the Lincoln manifolds that I have. Does anyone know if these would even fit the '71-73 (exit angle and such)? If not, which ones will? The exhaust conundrum is one of the bigger things keeping me from big blockin' it, since I have a 5.0, an alloy headed 351W and the original C as options. Thanks in advance.
  2. I have 2 OE Ford intakes, one square bore and one spreadbore. They both have been out in the weather for a long time, but seem to be functional. Yes there is pitting everywhere. No, I do not see any cracks or stripped threads. Maybe one of these will hit the date code lottery for you. Free to good home, pick up near Pittsburgh, PA 15068. Sorry, but I really do not want to ship these. Email motoarts@yahoo.com or IM here please. intakes, one square bore and one spreadbore. They both have been out in the weather for a long time, but seem to be functional. Yes there is pitting everywhere. No, I do not see any cracks or stripped threads but there might me one that I missed. I can inspect closer if need be. Free to good home, pick up near Pittsburgh, PA 15068. Sorry, but I really do not want to ship these. Email motoarts@yahoo.com or IM here please.
  3. Not yet, but I will. Found this 23 channel beauty in a junkyard and polished it up, along with a Craig AM/FM/8-track with quick release anti-theft underdash slider (yes, it still works). I'll keep Steppenwolf and Creedence for it in memory of my Dad ;)
  4. I've been cleaning small brackets and hardware in Muriatic acid in a plastic coffee container for some time now. Oh, yeah it's wicked caustic stinky stuff, but works like magic... fast magic, too. Neutralize with baking soda/water in a bucket. Been DIY zinc plating a number of these small parts, too. I use an old marine anode for boat outdrives. Doesn't come out like new shiny zinc, but haven't tried any brightening agents (ie. saccharin) yet either. A quick buff with some fine steel wool works for what I'm using it for (old dirt bike OE hardware restoration). Also have tried hot oil blackening some of the bolts instead of black painting them. Looks good, but haven't really tested their resistance to the elements yet.
  5. Doggone it. Couldn't hardly be further away from Pittsburgh :( Sigh.
  6. Kevin, maybe I missed it but what tool(s) are you using to remove the existing paint? A Dynazip style wire wheel? Followed up by ??? Looks great!
  7. As mentioned above, I like paint THINNER (mineral spirits) for a job like this. Always test the plastic, but I can say over many jobs of cleaning adhesive off of boats, cars, aircraft, etc., thinner hasn't let me down and attacked any surfaces that I've cleaned. Not the fastest, but safest IMO. Wipe in one direction, turning the cloth regularly. Use a small cloth folded into a 2" square, keeping it wet. Wax and grease remover kinda feels and smells like it would work, but it just is not aggressive enough. Anything more aggressive (stripper, acetone, lacquer thinner, etc.) is positively not recommended for that job. Don't even think about it. Any old "dry" adhesive will need to be scraped off. After all adhesive is removed, clean well with dish soap and water to remove contaminates so any new adhesive will stick. Trust me on this step.
  8. I'm a big fan of the LED's in my daily drivers and motorcycles. No issues, except with turn signals (1157) and one oddball offroad motorcycle head light fitment. Standard 1156, 194's, etc. are no problem. I like the newer COB technology.
  9. I haven't heard of it either. Something new for me to check out at work tomorrow ::thumb::
  10. I've seen pictures of some Shelby Boss Mach 1 convertible coupes that needed these decals to complete their 100 point restorations. Some of them I think were even Frank Cone, Ram Air editions with reverse mounted deck spoilers.
  11. What is the current opinion of the Delrin strut rod bushings nowadays? I know rubber is generally too soft and poly is too hard (leading to rod breakage). I have a set of Midolyne bushings, and don't remember if they are recommended or not especially compared to Delrin.
  12. I have two C6's, but both are mid '70's Lincoln 460 applications. I've heard that the tail shafts are longer in the Lincoln compared to any Mustang, but I'm not certain. Also have (what I believe is) a freshly rebuilt, no fluid small block C6 that I can't seem to be able to sell for $175, which I thought was a giveaway price.
  13. My opinion is, aftermarket is purely a crap shoot. One brand, regardless of price, may fit perfectly on one application (or production run for that particular part), and another may fit horribly on another. I work in the aftermarket business. Not necessarily vintage Mustang specifically, but we do sell (some sporadic) vintage replacement parts as well as current late model stuff. The only consistency that I've noticed is the inconsistency, and it just isn't in sheetmetal parts (ie. lights, wheels, fender liners, etc.). Unfortunately, that's just the way it is, and most likely is going to be. On the bright side, a vast majority of the parts that go out of our door daily fit and function very, very well. Sometimes, better than OE, as I have seen poor fitting OE sheetmetal right out of the box first hand. I would absolutely suggest buying a large item such as a '71-73 hood from a local vendor that will allow you to inspect for shipping damage (very common) and fit to your particular car to avoid bad feelings about the purchase. I plan on a fiberglass hood for my car. I fully expect to have a somewhat large amount of time getting the gaps correct and removing waves in the surface. What I don't expect to do is repair heavily damaged corners or fragmented edges from being dropped on the edge of a dock or similar. I would also expect a sheetmetal hood to have few (or none if you're lucky) of those issues if I were buying one. Certainly not meaning to confuse things here, but would much rather you be aware of what I've experienced.
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