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Kilgon

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Everything posted by Kilgon

  1. As most of the replies pointed out it is going to vary widely depending on what you are wanting and where you live. I was wanting a good quality job for a nice driver - cruise in car. I spoke to 5 local shops and they were all over the place on price. Found one that was willing to work with me. As I mentioned in my earlier reply: I chemically stripped the car. I disassemble and delivered to them. There was very minimal body work. All panels were drill with alignment holes for easy reassembly - all lines were already good. I do the bulk of the reassembly short of the doors, hood, fenders and trunk. I provide hood stencil along with pictures. I know a couple of comments were made on the current price I'm getting for $5500 as being a steal but I have taken a great chunk of the labor out of the cost of it by the work I did and am going to do. I think if you are willing to do some of the labor as I did you should be able to find someone willing to work with you and save some money.
  2. Also see the attached video. Might jog your memory some. Lol. https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=dash+removal+71+mustang+fastback&&view=detail&mid=B8C11651D328AB267711B8C11651D328AB267711&rvsmid=3C0433DEF90B6E0819C03C0433DEF90B6E0819C0&fsscr=0&FORM=VDMCNR
  3. Glad you found the problem. It easy to make a mistake once in a while. As far as getting old - just remember "It is better to wear out than to rust out." :D
  4. I agree with Hemikiller on getting things in writing and be specific on what is to be done. As with anything , prices are going to vary by the area you live in and the amount of work needed. Shops that charge by the hour are more than likely going to cost you more than those that give a fixed price. I currently have mine in being painted now. I had strip the car to bare metal and delivered to them in pieces. They are doing the needed body work and painting the car to the instruction and pictures I provided. They painted the jams and inside of the hood and trunk lid. They have reassemble and aligned the body panels and currently are block sanding getting ready for final paint. The car will be returned as seen in the bottom picture painted with me still assembling a lot of the painted parts - quarter panel extensions - hood scopes - parking light trim etc. I was able to get a fixed price due to the work I had done and they could see the amount of body work needed. Total cost $5,500. Using PPG 2296 and sems hot rod black.
  5. Great pictures. I thought it was coming in on an angle. As David mention, it looks like your are going to need to adjust it or tweak it with a rubber mallet. Your hood needs to come forward a little. Why it is sitting back is anybody's guess. Could be just wasn't align right or perhaps to allow the twist locks to lock. I'm for sure there are several other ways of aligning your hood but I have found the following works beat for me. Before loosing the bolts on the hinges, make a mark on the front, back and both sides of the hinges so you get it back to where it was if it slides on you when you loosen the bolts. I found that taking the latch bar off helps to allow the hood to move a lot easier when closed. With some help open the hood enough to get to the hinge bolts on the hood. Loosen a little and close the hood and try to slide forward. You also need to see how your line is on the rear of the hood at the fenders. Once align open hood enough again to tighten bolts. Check alignment and repeat if necessary. Replace hood latch bar. You probably will have to readjust your twist lock brackets.
  6. Hmmm? - Try taking your hands and sort of smack the shoes back and forth toward each other to help seat and center them. Also see picture. I highlighted a few areas that if not seated will hold the shoes open as mentioned in some of the above post. Make sure the shoes are seated against the anchor pin and are sitting on the wear pads on the backing plate. Also check to make sure the brake strut bar and adjuster are seat all the way. Can you post a close up picture.
  7. Welcome from Ohio. Nice looking ride. It appears to be in good shape. What kind of help do you need?
  8. Great job and good to hear all went well. Glad to see we got some recognition. It is people like you that keeps the rest of us inspired. Awesome that you got the help!
  9. Was it ok than starting acting up or has it always been like this? From your picture it looks like the hood is sitting lower then the fender on the driver side. Did you try to adjust your hood adjustable bumper? A picture from the top of the hood would help also. Would be able to see the hood lines and hood molding fender extension lines. If the hood is askew a little it can cause problems.
  10. Do as Don C said. The adjustment of the EB cable should be the very last thing you do if it is needed when doing a brake job.
  11. Did you compare your new shoes to your old ones? If they are the same then it has to be one of the items David mentioned or somehow you applied the emergency bake.
  12. I know you replaced a drum on the rear but did you check the rotors. Had a similar problem with a 2012 F150. Had a slight vibration in the front end between 30 to 40 mph. Above 40 it would almost disappear but you could still feel it a little. Tried all the usual things to find the problem, wheel balance, rotation, checked all the steering components. Out of warranty but took back to dealer and the even they couldn't find the problem. While at the dealer noted that the front pads were getting low. Took back home and decided to go ahead with a brake job over the weekend. During the process of replacing the driver side I found that the rotor was warped. I had no pulsing in the brake pedal when the problem was occurring. Got new rotor and problem was solved.
  13. Welcome from Ohio. Good luck on your build. Your granddaughter is lucky to have a grandfather like you.
  14. First things first. You have to remember that rust is caused by exposure to moisture and air. If the surface has never been exposed than yes it could be rust free after 46 years. Most rust on older cars occur from the inside out. By this I mean that it occurs on the inside of panels where there is little or no type of treatment and rust through to the outside. We first notice it as a bubble under the paint with rust stains. Paint chips and scratches of course expose the surface and allow rust. As far as telling what sheet metal has been replaced is not that easy. The floor area was a stamped out solid piece with no seems. If the floor pans have been replaced you should be able to see signs of this from underneath. The quarter panels, rockers, and roof can be a little harder to detect. Most of the time welds are only grounded on the finish surface side. I would look at all expose areas to see if you can see a weld seam where there shouldn't be one. Depending on where the weld was made, you might not be able to tell without pulling interior panels. Others you might not be able to tell at all - patches on rockers or in the trunk above the gas tank. When is comes to under the hood most of the time full apron and firewall panels are replaced. The cowl could have a patched inside by the air intake. This is one area that is rust prone. If the job was done right it will be hard to tell. you can pull the cowl vent screens and try to see if there is a patch on either side. You would have to get under the dash to tell. Also would need to pull the heater box to check out passenger side.. You could to try to see if the top of the cowl has been removed by the spots welds looking different or out of place. It might be time for a full strip to bare metal. This will allow you to find all the rusted and bondo areas and make any needed repairs. If you plan on keeping the car it would pay for itself in the long run.
  15. Why not just buy a rebuilt core? I don't know the difference between the years but for my 71 it only cost me $60. You can get a pulley puller from most of the auto stores to use for free. I got the rebuilt at Napa for $60 with old core. Easy to press out of the canister and replace with the rebuilt unit. If not in stock they will have with in a few days instead of months. Rattle can the housing and it looked like new.
  16. Sounds good. Mine is scratch and smug kind of bad and can't get a replacement due to it has a tach. Any improvement would be great. Can't wait to see the before and after pictures.
  17. As mentioned 2 minutes isn't much time. Great info from everyone. It seems that all the info we have is from everyone that has an original paint job and it seems that no two are alike. The big question, does any know what the exact measurements are that came from the factory. It would seem that there has to be some specs out there in Ford archives or somewhere. If we could come up with those then the stencil manufacturers would have to make corrections.
  18. Thanks jpaz. Not doing concourse but want it to look good. I'm going to go with the same as yours. Looks great. I have the rest of the body color figured out. Got the info from http://429mustangcougarinfo.50megs.com/paint_info.htm.
  19. OK - Need to try to get this straight. My car is in the shop getting ready to be painted. The 2" back is a no brainer. My question is from the scopes to the cowl. Is this the same distance from the edge of the hood making a straight line back or does it flare out a little. I looked at all the pictures and it is different on some of them. David's looks almost straight within a 1/16" while the picture of the one from Canada appears to be over 1/2".
  20. Kilgon

    Hello!

    Welcome from Ohio. Looks like it will be a great project.
  21. Welcome from Ohio. Nice looking. Should be a fun project.
  22. It looks correct based on the picture you sent. Did you go to CJPony's site and check their install directions along with the photo's they have. If it is not being placed in the right orientation it will not fit.
  23. Welcome aboard from Ohio. You are a lucky man to have such a talented wife. Just remember these cars are diamonds in the rough. With some perseverance, a lot of sweat equity and a few dollars you will reap the rewards of having one of the best looking cars ever built.
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