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Idaho Chris

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Idaho Chris last won the day on July 21

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About Idaho Chris

Vehicle Info

  • My Car
    1973 Mach 1
    Some other Fords

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  • Location
    North Idaho & The Bahamas
  • Region
    Northwest

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  • Sex
    Male

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  1. I reassembled my instrument cluster after installing LED lights. After bench testing to confirm all was well I reinstalled the cluster. Unfortunately after screwing it back in place in the dash the lights did not light up when I turned on the headlights. Damn... After some troubleshooting I determined that the switch was to blame. I guess after 48 years some corrosion is to be expected. Since the dimmer resistance coil was loose on the switch and the internal contacts are suspect I decided not to try and clean it. I have ordered a new switch. I moved on from the dash to the underside and fitted up the new exhaust system. The tailpipes are going to need a little work to get the tips to exit through the rear valence in the right spot, but otherwise all was well. I am hoping my new driveshaft shows up next week.
  2. I bled the brakes. I used the vacuum method. All in all I fed about a quart of DOT 3 into the system. I will use the two person pedal method to confirm all the air is out before driving the car. Now with brakes bled and the heater core replaced, I put the strut braces back in place, ran new vacuum hoses and finished up the engine bay. Ha! I've been looking all over for my missing deep 11/16" socket, and after posting up this photo I notice it is sitting on the washer fluid bottle. Mystery solved!
  3. Jason- I have a set of the original Ford Shop Manuals that I bought direct from Ford back in 1975. They came in a five volume set and I use them most every day I work on the car. I highly recommend them. It looks like NPD sells a repro: https://www.npdlink.com/product/shop-manual-printed-1973-ford-mercury-car/138046?backurl=search%2Fproducts%3Fsearch_terms%3Dshop%2Bmanual%26top_parent%3D200001%26year%3D1973&year=1973 If the above repro is anything like the repro I recently bought from them for the 1970 model year, the repro is just as the original but they combine volumes into a couple of bindings instead of separate books for each volume. The separate bindings are easier to lay out flat on a workbench but other than that the repros are just like the originals. Worth the $ if you are planning to get serious!
  4. I did a lot of little things to the car today; filled the radiator, cleaned up the wiring behind the dash, fitted a new lens to the instrument cluster (waiting for new bulbs before re-installation), topped the transmission fluid, and made up a little wiring harness to connect the new T-5 transmission to the factory automatic transmission wiring harness:
  5. There are only two switches on the T-5. A neutral safety switch and a backup light switch, both of which I intend to wire into the factory harness. I do not care about keeping the seatbelt warning circuit active. In that case can I get away with either shorting the factory harness connection or do I leave the circuit open?
  6. So Don or others, one more question. What do you suggest I do with the seatbelt buzzer circuit? There is a separate connector with two wires running to the auto shifter for this circuit. Thanks!
  7. Today I took apart the front seats and cleaned them up. I also repainted and lubricated the seat tracks. Next I took apart the instrument cluster to replace the lens and clean things up.
  8. I installed this clip just as directed by Tim- pushing into the hole and with pliers and squeezing the tabs together. Two photos below. From underneath the car and from the footwell:
  9. So having removed my FMX transmission and installed a Tremec T-5 I would like to make up a short wiring harness. I want to plug into the existing connector (previously connected to harness that ran to the automatic transmission shifter) on the engine side of the firewall. Before I start cutting wires I am hoping for some verification that I have the correct plan: Confirm that the Neutral Safety Switch wiring (prevents start unless in neutral) are the two Red with Light Blue stripe wires? Confirm that the back up light wires are the Black with Violet stripe and White with Violet stripe wires? Further that in both cases, these wires need to be closed to provide function. Thank you! -Chris
  10. I removed the heater/AC box and replaced the heater core. As it turns out the job was pretty straight forward and not as difficult as I had anticipated from my research. I followed the steps in the Ford Shop Manual. First I removed the carpet. I am installing new carpet anyway and figured I'd need every inch of room to drop the box. The floor was in real good shape. Next I laid out a sheet of craft paper on a table. Not knowing what all parts I would be removing I labeled everything on the table as I removed things. If I am not going to be immediately reassembling something I am careful to bag and label, but if I know I am immediately putting everything back together I find the table labeling method to be more convenient. The box was in real good shape. No internal signs of leakage. No critter nests. No cracks or chips. Of particular note. I did not have to remove the dash. (the Ford manuals confirm this). By removing the footwell side trim and the carpet and padding I had just enough room to pull the box right and rotate it out from under the dash. Other than removing the glove box and door no other disassembly was necessary. Here's a photo of the box prior to disassembly. And here it is torn down. I did buy a seal kit and replaced all the foam when I put the box back together. I also spent the extra $15 to buy a non-aluminum heater core. I have not had good luck with aluminum cores as they do not appear to hold up over time. I did check the new core for leaks (as suggested by David w Carolina Mountain Mustangs) prior to installation. I removed the A/C evaporator since it is no longer needed. Since moving to North Idaho from Florida I find there is really no need for air conditioning and I have removed the compressor and other A/C equipment from the engine bay to give me more room. The box went back in even easier than it came out. I'd say the whole job start to finish took about four leisurely hours. Having done the job once now I could probably do it again in about half the time. All in all not the horror story I was anticipating.
  11. I installed new rear axle seals and brakes. Thankfully the rear bearings were good so I didn't need to replace them. Rear drum brakes are something I really don't enjoy doing. It is a very messy job and even with the right brake tools I always end up struggling with a spring or retainer. A scrape or cut on one hand or the other just add to the experience. I am happy to have the job behind me. Tomorrow I dig into the heater core replacement. After researching what is involved to get to the heater core I suspect I going to find I prefer working on rear brakes...
  12. I'd install a set of the new springs and see how much lift they give you. If you decide you need more lift you can order a shackle extension kit from Eaton and install that. The extra length rear shackles would probably take you no more than 15 minutes a side to install if you decide you need them.
  13. I've had both. A good two poster will run you a bit more money than a 4 post. There is no comparison for working on your car; two post all day long. It is a rare dealership indeed that doesn't exclusively use two posts in their mechanic bays. If you need dual use to store/stack a car then four post is the way to go. When I built my dream garage I went with an asymmetrical two post and paid up for USA made. I am really happy with my setup.
  14. I think it will really be a struggle to make the change without pulling the box. There sure isn't much room up in there unless you have tiny hands and don't mind skinning up your wrists. Of course with the bearing mod you don't have a choice since a little welding is necessary.
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