Jump to content

Don C

VIP Members
  • Content Count

    6859
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    57

Everything posted by Don C

  1. You might also try posting them in the Classified section of the forum. If someone is looking for parts that will be the logical place to look.
  2. Yeah, back in the day you just left it in for a while, drain and flush, and then use a neutralizer and flush again. But it just took 30 minutes, not 3 days. Yes it was toxic. While the new stuff may not be toxic it can still flush out some lead and other metals with it.
  3. https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/prestone-4666/chemicals---fluids-16461/maintenance-chemicals-16867/radiator---cooling-25136/radiator-flush-17737/02670340b31b/prestone-flush-and-cleaner/as105y/4666545?q=radiator+flush&pos=1 This is good to flush the crud out of the block and radiator https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/prestone-4666/belts-hoses-16454/antifreeze-flush-kit-test-17481/5c22aa2bdb80/prestone-antifreeze-flush-and-fill-kit/afkit/4666543?pos=4
  4. Did you look at his monthly summary? 79 bids on 29 items, and 38 withdrawn bids.
  5. it is very difficult to change pistons with the engine in the car. Just getting the oil pan off will take longer than pulling the engine. Whether it needs bored or not depends on the condition of the cylinder walls.
  6. Here are the Mustang Steve's conversion brackets, they fit drum brake spindles, only https://www.mustangsteve.com/product-category/front-disc-brake-conversion-brackets/
  7. Imagine a torque curve like that on an engine that isn't supposed to have any low end.
  8. +1 on do not run without a thermostat, especially in hot climates. The thermostat provides enough restriction in the water flow so the coolant has time to absorb heat in the block and then transfer the heat to the air in the radiator. You may have overfilled the radiator. When you shut the engine off all of that engine heat transfers into the coolant in the block, may even cause some of it to boil, expanding the coolant and causing some to burp out.
  9. I had a Y block I had taken out of a '64 F100 and transplanted into a '55 Willys 4x4 wagon and ran it for 30+ years on unleaded with no problem. However, the '70 390FE I put in the '64 F100 only went about 15 years before the valves recessed enough to cause the engine to idle rough. Pulled the heads off it and some were recessed more than the thickness of the valve heads. The Willys wagon was my daily driver and our family weekend trips into the mountains, so it was driven a lot. The F100 was only used occasionally, so the 390 probably had 1/4 the miles of the Y block in the Willys. Since
  10. 10° should be easier to start with than 16°. At first I thought you might be having a carburetor heat soak/percolation problem, but now I'm think something else because it won't start. The backfiring through the carb can be an indication of a lean issue, or a really bad ignition timing problem. The other possibility for the slipped timing is that the pin that holds the gear to the distributor shaft has sheared. Does your car have the stock volume and pressure oil pump? Just in case it is flooded I would let it set for a while and try starting it again. Also check your oil to see
  11. It's not a real big job, the radiator, water pump, harmonic balancer/crankshaft pullies, and timing cover have to be removed. Yes, to really get the potential benefits from the head swap you should correct the cam timing. The camshafts in the CJs have a little better grind than the M codes, when the cam timing is set right. When you find the heads I would have them machined for adjustable rocker arms and have hardened valve seats installed and install new valve springs and one-piece valves. Have the valve guides checked also.
  12. Timing ring on the harmonic balancer slipping is one possibility.
  13. That's always a gamble that the retaining washer is in place on the pump drive shaft. When you pull the distributor out the rotor will rotate some, due to the angle cut on the gears. After you get the distributor pulled up far enough so the rotor is free you turn the rotor enough so the gear drops down into the camshaft 1 or 2 teeth in the direction you want the correction to be in. What is the timing now, at idle with the vacuum advance removed and plugged?
  14. It would be easy to make a nice looking block-off plate with something like this if they don't have something available: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004UBUV5O/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  15. I would take a printed check list when you go talk to him and make sure he reads through it while you're there and leave it with him. That reduces the chance of misunderstanding and "I thought you meant - - - -".
  16. Isn't it nice to have 1sostatic back, so we can have these conversations again? By the way, glad you found your way back, both of you.
  17. On cars our age you always have to wonder how many times it has gone past 99,999, especially when it is showing that low mileage. The odometer might be accurate, just not telling the whole story.
  18. It'll be truly yours when you are finished with it. Looking forward to seeing your progress on it,
  19. Nice car(s). I like the '64 Sports Coupe, they are nice looking, nice ride. I'm assuming that you have upgraded the engine and transmission in it, based on your work on your other cars.
  20. With only 3 volts it's no wonder you're getting inconsistent spark. Disconnect the wire from the positive side of the coil, and with the ignition switch in the run position check the voltage on the wire you just removed from the coil. Without any load on that wire, it should read close to battery voltage. When connected to the coil and the points are closed it should read around 7 or 8 volts. Do you see a little white rectangular ceramic device anywhere near the coil that has wires connected to it? Someone may have mistakenly added a ballast resistor to your system. Check the voltage at that f
  21. I knew that kind of stuff would happen when states started legalizing weed, at least we don't have to ask "I wonder what he's smoking?"
  22. One of the biggest problems is the limited space available to swing the big hammer. I have C clamp that is even older than me that is super heavy duty and the throat of it is just 6 or 8 inches, and it uses a hex wrench to turn it. An appropriately sized socket over the bolt head and after letting a good dose of panther piss soak on it it will press just about anything apart. I did have to resort to a Sawzall once on a '64 F100 I used to have, though.
  23. Air, fuel and spark is what it takes. Air and fuel mixed in the right proportions, spark at the right time. Make sure you are getting fuel into the carburetor bowls and fuel squirts out of the nozzles when the throttle is opened. You say new distributor, that leads to several possibilities, the most common errors are not have #1 on the compression stroke and not having the correct firing order in a counterclockwise rotation.
  24. No doubt who that came from, don't have to click on the link to find out. Glad he hasn't lost his humor in his absence.
×
×
  • Create New...