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Oh really????????????:P:P:P

 

Greg:)

Sure..strictly from a percentage of work labor cost..when was the last time you spent months laying down paint on a straight up color ? vs stripping, sanding, metal work, filler work, priming, blocking.:whistling:

LOVE OF BEAUTY IS TASTE..THE CREATION OF BEAUTY IS ART

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Oh really????????????:P:P:P

 

Greg:)

Sure..strictly from a percentage of work labor cost..when was the last time you spent months laying down paint on a straight up color ? vs stripping, sanding, metal work, filler work, priming, blocking.:whistling:

 

Forget the back yard, you gotta go pro Q!!:P:P

 

Greg:)

:whistling: LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED

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Oh really????????????:P:P:P

 

Greg:)

Sure..strictly from a percentage of work labor cost..when was the last time you spent months laying down paint on a straight up color ? vs stripping, sanding, metal work, filler work, priming, blocking.:whistling:

 

Forget the back yard, you gotta go pro Q!!:P:P

 

Greg:)

One of the best paint jobs I ever did was outside. A friend of mine's kid did the body work, all they wanted me to do was shoot it. When I got there it was in a really nasty barn so we pulled it outside, I wiped it down, tacked it, and shot it...still find it hard to believe how good this kid was at bodywork...no cutting or buffing was even needed. The kid wrecked it like a month later and totaled it out :-/

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Sure..strictly from a percentage of work labor cost..when was the last time you spent months laying down paint on a straight up color ? vs stripping, sanding, metal work, filler work, priming, blocking.:whistling:

 

Forget the back yard, you gotta go pro Q!!:P:P

 

Greg:)

One of the best paint jobs I ever did was outside. A friend of mine's kid did the body work, all they wanted me to do was shoot it. When I got there it was in a really nasty barn so we pulled it outside, I wiped it down, tacked it, and shot it...still find it hard to believe how good this kid was at bodywork...no cutting or buffing was even needed. The kid wrecked it like a month later and totaled it out :-/

 

Legendary!!:P:P

 

 

They used to call me the hottest gun in the west.

That was until i stopped leaving my spraygun in the booth on bake cycle!!lollerz

 

Greg:P:P

:whistling: LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED

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Oh really????????????:P:P:P

 

Greg:)

Sure..strictly from a percentage of work labor cost..when was the last time you spent months laying down paint on a straight up color ? vs stripping, sanding, metal work, filler work, priming, blocking.:whistling:

 

Forget the back yard, you gotta go pro Q!!:P:P

 

Greg:)

 

Not trying to get into a pissing contest here, but I completely agree with Q on this one. Where there's a will there's a way. I currently work for a national company that does a variety of reconditioning services to car dealerships. I make a living painting bumpers and repairing alloy wheels. The bumpers get painted outside, sometimes in gravel parking lots, on the cars. Hack you say??? Perhaps to a certain degree, but I have to say, most of them come out quite presentable with no sanding and buffing. The dealers are happy with them because they look a hell of a lot better then they did with scrapes on them, and quite honestly for what I get paid, I'd spray iced tea on the bumpers if that's what they told me to do.

Bottom line, if you wanna paint your car outside, go for it! If it gets dirt in in it, put a few extra coats of clear on it, then sand and buff it. For a real nice show car you're gonna sand and buff it anyway, even if you used a booth.

Just my 2 cents.

2011smallsig_zps31c630dc.png

"It's what you learn after you know it

all that counts."

-Chip Foose

 

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Sure..strictly from a percentage of work labor cost..when was the last time you spent months laying down paint on a straight up color ? vs stripping, sanding, metal work, filler work, priming, blocking.:whistling:

 

Forget the back yard, you gotta go pro Q!!:P:P

 

Greg:)

 

Not trying to get into a pissing contest here, but I completely agree with Q on this one. Where there's a will there's a way. I currently work for a national company that does a variety of reconditioning services to car dealerships. I make a living painting bumpers and repairing alloy wheels. The bumpers get painted outside, sometimes in gravel parking lots, on the cars. Hack you say??? Perhaps to a certain degree, but I have to say, most of them come out quite presentable with no sanding and buffing. The dealers are happy with them because they look a hell of a lot better then they did with scrapes on them, and quite honestly for what I get paid, I'd spray iced tea on the bumpers if that's what they told me to do.

Bottom line, if you wanna paint your car outside, go for it! If it gets dirt in in it, put a few extra coats of clear on it, then sand and buff it. For a real nice show car you're gonna sand and buff it anyway, even if you used a booth.

Just my 2 cents.

 

I'll pretend you didn't say all that Obsidian.

 

Greg:)

:whistling: LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED

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The real money for a paint job is in the body work..Prep...materials...wet sanding polishing..All stuff YOU can do right in the driveway...I have done many a car in the driveway including painting..A simple frame made of pvc tubing wrapped with 6-8 mil plastic works well.http://www.mycoupe.ca/modules/wordpress/?p=553.The killer is planing working around weather..I routinely paint/ spray parts outside..I just finished up a batch of parts this week all done outside..I'm also in the middle of doing the engine compartment of my green 72 outside on the driveway..I will be spraying it there too..The only thing I will do is set up a 10x10 pop up shade shelter over it..Where there's a will there's a way..You can do all the body work..edging(painting the jambs undersides) at home then see if there's a local trade school who will let you rent booth time or better yet do the paint. Here's some pics of the parts I did this week, look at the quality of the finish:)

 

 

I've painted small parts like this in the driveway too and they turned out good. I agree that the prep work is 80% or more of the paint job. I plan to test the home made paint booth at some point in the near future when we paint the grabber blue car for my 13 yr old son to drive when he's 16.

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Hey Guys,

 

I'm just having a little fun here and stirring up the pot so to speak.:P

 

But on a fairly serious note, the matter's been raised about spraypainting around family and pets etc, etc. from or around your home.

 

I don't know what your State to State health and safety laws are like around America exactly, but here in Australia they take those sort of things fairly seriously. We have laws in place that would stop you from spraypainting out in the open and/or near and aroiud your house in a typical suburban environment where your neighbours live close by, and would be effected by your painting.

 

You do have to think of your neighbours and your family with this sort of activity, and is it a safe and fair thing to do. Also, if you go to the trouble of constructing a makeshift spraybooth,whether it's a garage or tent idea, there are two things to consider. The fumes created could be exhausted out of your so called booth, but where do they go? They go around the neighbourhood and cause problems.(Unless you've found a clever way to quell all the fumes after they leave your booth) Secondly, if you don't exhaust your fumes, you get a massive buildup in your booth. That is very dangerous and life threatening to the spraypainter in the booth full of fumes.

 

Pro spraybooths can be hired out for reasonable hourly rates around the cities, and are a good idea for all to take advantage of. Think about it guys.

 

Greg:)

:whistling: LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED

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I no longer have to spend money on the pest control guys since i started painting outside. :P

 

You do make a good point to make sure no pets or people are around. I never heard of any offenses in usa about painting outside. Always wear a full painters suit with filtered mask if you do any makeshift paint booth. It does get pretty bad.

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Had to buy my paint in Nevada to get good solvent based paint and clear. Industrial finishes in Reno gave advice buy best quality clear you can. I bought Sikkens top quality base and clear and sealer primer. Ended up with 1 gal and 1 quart of color plus 1 quart black pearl for stripes, plus all the other reducers, activators etc cost $1300. My painter bad mouths Summit but is okay with Eastwood. Again, he loved the sikkens clear. Best luck

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Hey Guys,

 

I'm just having a little fun here and stirring up the pot so to speak.:P

 

But on a fairly serious note, the matter's been raised about spraypainting around family and pets etc, etc. from or around your home.

 

I don't know what your State to State health and safety laws are like around America exactly, but here in Australia they take those sort of things fairly seriously. We have laws in place that would stop you from spraypainting out in the open and/or near and aroiud your house in a typical suburban environment where your neighbours live close by, and would be effected by your painting.

 

You do have to think of your neighbours and your family with this sort of activity, and is it a safe and fair thing to do. Also, if you go to the trouble of constructing a makeshift spraybooth,whether it's a garage or tent idea, there are two things to consider. The fumes created could be exhausted out of your so called booth, but where do they go? They go around the neighbourhood and cause problems.(Unless you've found a clever way to quell all the fumes after they leave your booth) Secondly, if you don't exhaust your fumes, you get a massive buildup in your booth. That is very dangerous and life threatening to the spraypainter in the booth full of fumes.

 

Pro spraybooths can be hired out for reasonable hourly rates around the cities, and are a good idea for all to take advantage of. Think about it guys.

 

Greg:)

At the hobbyist level there's very little the town or state can do,,at the worst they will warn you to stop & most of the time that would be after your done..Most of the fumes dissipate very quickly..I've actually seen house painters who spray make more of a problem create huge clouds of overspray..Check any commercial spray booth exhaust when a car is being painted..They expel fumes too...The only way to have minimal emissions is by the use of a water wash system..In essence it's a water fall ..that the overspray travels over on it's way out the booth, the water catches a good percentage of the overspray which is then converted back to a solid you dispose of..No matter how you slice the pie auto body work & it's related operations use hazardous substances chemicals that you have to be aware of in order to facilitate the proper use of. NEVER EVER spray in a enclosed area with out proper ventilation protective gear. Which is what Greg is saying..

LOVE OF BEAUTY IS TASTE..THE CREATION OF BEAUTY IS ART

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few things no one mentioned. Get you practice panel from a body shop their take offs are fine and represent 9 cents per pound scrap. much cheaper that wrecking yard. Yes lots of filtered ventilation and yes mask for isocyanates better yet if you can come up with fresh air hood. Family away until house well ventilated. Depending on your weather leave it alone to gas out fully for 2 days to a week

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Hey Guys,

 

I'm just having a little fun here and stirring up the pot so to speak.:P

 

But on a fairly serious note, the matter's been raised about spraypainting around family and pets etc, etc. from or around your home.

 

I don't know what your State to State health and safety laws are like around America exactly, but here in Australia they take those sort of things fairly seriously. We have laws in place that would stop you from spraypainting out in the open and/or near and aroiud your house in a typical suburban environment where your neighbours live close by, and would be effected by your painting.

 

 

You do have to think of your neighbours and your family with this sort of activity, and is it a safe and fair thing to do. Also, if you go to the trouble of constructing a makeshift spraybooth,whether it's a garage or tent idea, there are two things to consider. The fumes created could be exhausted out of your so called booth, but where do they go? They go around the neighbourhood and cause problems.(Unless you've found a clever way to quell all the fumes after they leave your booth) Secondly, if you don't exhaust your fumes, you get a massive buildup in your booth. That is very dangerous and life threatening to the spraypainter in the booth full of fumes.

 

Pro spraybooths can be hired out for reasonable hourly rates around the cities, and are a good idea for all to take advantage of. Think about it guys.

 

Greg:)

At the hobbyist level there's very little the town or state can do,,at the worst they will warn you to stop & most of the time that would be after your done..Most of the fumes dissipate very quickly..I've actually seen house painters who spray make more of a problem create huge clouds of overspray..Check any commercial spray booth exhaust when a car is being painted..They expel fumes too...The only way to have minimal emissions is by the use of a water wash system..In essence it's a water fall ..that the overspray travels over on it's way out the booth, the water catches a good percentage of the overspray which is then converted back to a solid you dispose of..No matter how you slice the pie auto body work & it's related operations use hazardous substances chemicals that you have to be aware of in order to facilitate the proper use of. NEVER EVER spray in a enclosed area with out proper ventilation protective gear. Which is what Greg is saying..

 

"NEVER EVER spray in a enclosed area with out proper ventilation protective gear. Which is what Greg is saying.."

 

+1 "Q" I remember (barely) spraying a huge back hoe tractor for a local municipality when I was 19 years old back in 1985 in their building with poor ventilation . When I left there I was High as a kite off of the Dupont Centari Enamel fumes and I was wearing a charcoal filter mask. Besides that your visibility greatly diminishes if you don't have very good ventilation. Thanks for the hazy memory "Q" :)

Dennis

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I don't know if anybody else has mentioned this, but to spray paint you need a good air compressor. A HVLP gun will eat cfm like their is no tomorrow. A conventional gun will take less cfm, but overspray will be worse. If you have a small air compressor look at a LVLP gun, I use a Star(Astro Pneumatic Evo T S4000) with my small compressor. I can get away with painting one coat on a hood before the compressor kicks down. When choosing paint go with the base clear, it is more novice friendly. If you go with single stage and it is a metallic, good luck, even a non metallic is not easy to spray. Here are some before and after pictures of my moms old car that I repainted for her. I used PPG single stage acrylic urethane paint with a convential Devil Biss JGA gun. All prep work was done in the garage, the laying down of tha paint was done in a rented paint booth.

745182148_INeedPaint.JPG.f13b6f5bff6137a11ffe1b7797fddc0d.JPG

1805487424_Before1.JPG.998b8d7609b6b8f606f4f66fc98df012.JPG

1310025569_GodHelpMe.JPG.2158c18ba5cf12703b351f07fa05e242.JPG

1716275851_UglyUgly.JPG.5a633405a015ad7c86847e869dffacc7.JPG

Beautiful.JPG.217bd8f742904d62519f1ec52a807157.JPG

22124233_ItsRed.JPG.61bffde57b389576cd124d9f5c236a42.JPG

1143893635_MyFavoritePicture.JPG.ce4b462802a008bb34ac8e47646bcc1a.JPG

my current rides

1973 Mustang Coupe

1989 Mercury Cougar XR7

1973 Mercury XR7 Cougar Convertible(sold)

1966 Mercury Comet 202

1985 F150 4x4

1962 Ford Fairlane 500

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Everyone has great advice! I really want to achieve this goal of painting her myself. My father was a painter for General Motors for 21 years before they switched over to automatic painting and all that new fancy stuff they have going on in the assembly factories. He does fantastic work to say the least. I think I am going to fly him out here to help me out, not do it for me, but give pointers on technique and to be in the booth when I do paint it. I found out today while I was changing my oil on base that the auto hobby shop has a paint booth that has been closed for years, damn EPA in California. Anyway I was asking if it would ever reopen, especially with water based paint now, they said probably not, but did recommend a place that rents booth time, so I think that is what I will do after having all the body work complete in my garage.

Oh and weather will never be an issue where I live...San Diego is 72 and sunny about 360 days a year! Thanks again for all your advice and stories!

1_12_09_14_10_32_45.png

 

- Nik

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Oh yeah one more very important item.

 

Turn OFF all gas lines and extinguish any pilot lights...water heater, gas dryer, stove, gas logs.

 

May not be an issue with water borne paint but you never know. No need to blow up the house.

 

I use gas heat in my garage - haven't blown up yet

 

Anyone remember the lacquer paint job buzz :)

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Oh yeah one more very important item.

 

Turn OFF all gas lines and extinguish any pilot lights...water heater, gas dryer, stove, gas logs.

 

May not be an issue with water borne paint but you never know. No need to blow up the house.

 

I use gas heat in my garage - haven't blown up yet

 

Anyone remember the lacquer paint job buzz :)

Oh yeah...well...I remember some of it :D

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Your car will only look as good as your prep work. Make sure you use a primer that is compatible with the paint you chose. Base coat clear coat is the way to go. Use a gravity feed gun. I don't know anybody, or body shop, that still uses the old type siphon guns. Use a fair amount of clear coat (min 2 coats, three better). Be careful wet sanding and buffing afterwards. Always a problem if you buff your clear coat off and get into the base coat.

 

Painting isn't near as hard as many people think. Don't fear it and it will turn out great.:cool:

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  • 1 month later...

So, I will be moving into a house soon with a two car garage, my dream since I have been an adult. Now I will have a place to work on my car without having to put it all back together at the end to drive it home from the hobby shop on base. I really want my exterior to look nice. Living in SoCal is frustrating because body and paint guys are soooo damn expensive here and I will not take my car to Tijuana to have it painted for cheap. Now that I will have a garage, I am thinking of painting it in the garage. I will build an interior frame and use 6 mil plastic to cover the whole thing, then add air filters and box fans for negative air system, add lights and make sure it all air tight for no dust. The area I am running blank on is type of paint, the better guns, and filtration from my compressor to the gun. Is it necessary to have a different gun for the three stages of paint...primer, base, clear. How much paint is needed to paint a 71 Mustang? Where is the best place to buy paint supplies? What brand of paint is best, are some better than others? I live in California so is a water based paint best for me here? Is single stage paint any good, or is a clear on top of a base the way to go? I want to paint her a modified grabber lime metallic with gloss black on the hood and a modified mach one stripe down the side. Should I paint the black first and then mask it off, paint the lime, and then clear; or lime, black, then clear? I know its a lot of questions, and I have been a google tech all day with this and still dont have any clear answers other than the technical info. So what have you guys used? This will be my first paint and body experience. I know the paint job is nothing without clean body work, so I will take my time with prep. Anyone else tackled this in their garage? Thanks guys!!!

 

getting started in painting can be an overwhelming task. There is a lot to learn esp with the new waterborne systems out there today. Where to get the paint, what do you add in relation to your environment ( ie temp, humidity, etc ), what kind of gun, nozzle size for the type of media to be sprayed.....I can go on and on. I have some dvds that will give you a great foundation. If you would like for me to send them to you drop me a pm and I can get them to ya.

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