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The Rickster - a 73 Mach 1 work in progress


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Today, I got the cowl finished up.  It was a rusted out mess, as they tend to get over the years.  I got it cut out and the new one drilled and prepped for installation.  I am going to have afte

With the torque box repaired, I got to work on the driver side rear floor pan extension.  I removed the rest of the rear floor pan extension and the flange that folds downward around the inner wheelho

Well, here are some we pictures of the engine compartment with the repaired frame rail, replacement inner aprons, core support,  and crossmembers.

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I flew back in town earlier today and was finally able to get the piece cut off the parts car for you this afternoon. Wow, that piece took a lot of effort but it's off. Woohoo.

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Awesome! Thanks, Don. I promise to NOT tell your wife that you were messing with your cars on a weekday. ;)

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've been working on some temporary wheels for the rear end. I reinstalled the rear springs, and then bolted in the rear axle housing, without axles or center section. I cut out some 5x6 in plates from some 1/4" steel and drilled them to match the bolt holes for the backing plate.

 

I cut a 15" piece of 2" square tube, that will be welded to the plate. At the bottom, I'll weld another 1/4" plate that I will mount the caster on. I'll add some gussets to the bottom for a little added stiffness, before I'm done. I figure that the leaf springs handle the rotational torque from the engine and keep the rear axle from wrapping to badly, so it should be able to keep the square tube vertical.

 

IMAG0191_zpsl8uvap6i.jpg

 

IMAG0193_zpsbbfw8auh.jpg

 

I haven't welded it up yet, so critiques of my plan are welcome.

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Ron, Just a thought that the axle may want to rotate on you in the u-bolts. I thought about fabbing one up like this for the rear of my car, but just ended up leaving the donor axle in it.

 

skgi_4315756_8328.jpg.084256392c96de8b76e679ca1527e869.jpg

BKDunha

72 Mach 1 H-Code (Concourse driven restoration)

67 S-Code Factory GT with 4-Spd

68 Mercury Cyclone (Pro-Street project)

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I thought about the axle rotation. The axle tube does have a flat welded on where it sits on the spring, and the plate on the bottom allows the U-bolts to put a pretty good force holding it flat on the spring. It does withstand the rotational force of a few hundred foot pounds of torque when doing a burnout, so I figured it would hold up to pushing around the driveway. Do you think I'm creating a disaster just waiting to happen?

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Ron, your right. I rethought that after I hit the submit button. Let us know how it works when finalized and maybe provide some dimensions for others to recreate.

BKDunha

72 Mach 1 H-Code (Concourse driven restoration)

67 S-Code Factory GT with 4-Spd

68 Mercury Cyclone (Pro-Street project)

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Ron, your right. I rethought that after I hit the submit button. Let us know how it works when finalized and maybe provide some dimensions for others to recreate.

 

Will do, with pictures, too. :-)

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Well, I finished the roller for the rear end. Once the springs were in place, I added an empty axle housing.

 

IMAG0199_zpsvtku8dwq.jpg

 

I used 1/4" plate and drilled it to fit the backing plate bolt holes. They were 4-1/2 x 6".

IMAG0200_zpsgaaehq9y.jpg

 

I cut a 15" piece of 3/16" wall, 2" square tubing. For appearances, I beveled the top about 15 degrees.

IMAG0201_zpsgk4aihux.jpg

 

Another 1/4" steel plate, cut 4-1/2 x 6" for the caster to bolt to. I drilled the plate for 3/8" bolts.

IMAG0202_zpssw2qwodm.jpg

 

The square tube was centered between the bolt holes, and checked to insure it was perfectly square before tack welding.

IMAG0205_zpsyvzqatxe.jpg

 

After tack welding, it was test fit to make sure there were no problems. I let the square tube run 1/2" above the plate so that I could weld it on the back along the top, as well as the bottom of the plate.

IMAG0206_zps1wplqut6.jpg

 

After final welding, the caster was bolted on and then it was bolted onto the axle.

IMAG0208_zpsioyfssww.jpg

 

The casters were from Harbor Freight. About $17 each.

IMAG0213_zpseiratjr5.jpg

 

And finally, the car as it sits on rollers, with no jack stands needed.

IMAG0211_zpsoqj7czqc.jpg

 

So there it is. The casters work really well. It rolls surprisingly easy. It has the car up high enough that I can work underneath, and with plenty of room to work in the wheel well. I'll still park jack stands under it whenever I'm under it, but it will sure make moving it around the garage a lot easier.

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Nice job!

 

Thanks. I think if i was going to do it again, instead of welding the square tube to the upper plate, I would drill it and add a couple of 1/2" bolts. One would be about the center of the axle tube, so there would be no interference, and the other maybe an inch below. It would mean a slightly larger upper plate, but would allow it to be used on axles with other bolt patterns, like a Ford 8.8 just by bolting on a different upper plate set. Overall, though, I'm really pleased with it.

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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  • 3 weeks later...

Good luck, Brother. I had a '69 in about the same shape. The more I stripped her down, the more rust I found. I didn't have the stick-to-it-iveness. Hats off to you. I really hope you can bring her back! I'll be following your progress.

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  • 6 years later...

Well, it's been a few years, and the Rustang has been just sitting in the barn.  I finally got my car barn done - well, mostly done.  I still have to install the ceiling fans, but its very useable.  I retired last month, and a few weeks later, I lost my brother to Covid, so I renamed the Mach 1, the Rickster, and will complete it as a memorial for him.  

I started on the front, and pulled the core support, and front right inner fender that the battery had rotted out.  When pulling the core support, I found the left front inner fender was also bent up and needed to be replaced.  I found that an outer frame rail is now available, too, so got the inner fender and frame rail ordered and have been getting them in place.  In cleaning things up, I also found the front crossmember had taken a whack, and it appears that someone may have tried to pull the car with the crossmember.  There are a couple of small rips in the steel dimple in the front right.  This crossmember is available, but it's not cheap.  Should I bite the bullet and replace, or hammer the dimple back into place, weld it up, and grind it smooth again.  I'm pretty sure I won't be able to do anything with the dent in the crossmember, though.  Let me know what you think I should do with that.  

Anyway, I better get back out to the barn, and get to work on this thing, or the wife will find something for me to do around the house, and that won't be nearly as much fun.  I'll keep y'all posted.

Ron

The Rickster crossmember Jul282020.jpg

The Rickster Jul292020.jpg

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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If you have a bent in place in the cross member you can cut hole in other side hammer it out some and then weld it back up. One important area in the cross member is there your radius rods to. Is that in good shape not torn, worn or out of round?
Congrats on the retirement and your brother getting the virus and passing sucks for sure. I just got in from the Dr. myself was wheezing when breathing getting phenomenon so got drugs and inhaler. 

Hope your chassis is not twisted makes everything very hard or impossible to align. 
Building looks great are you going to spray insulation? I put 6" in mine and is worth it. In winter takes nothing to heat it.

I have a vert with good front cross member I think would have to check. It was a ziebart car so not so much rust. You know where I am can cut it out cheap. 

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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Thanks, David.  I'll double check the radius rod mounting points to make sure they are okay.  Other than the tears in that dimple on the front, that crossmember seems to be okay - so far.  I'll let you know if I need to replace it, though. Thanks for the offer.  The walls of the shop you see in the pictures are the interior liner panels, with fiberglass insulation behind it.  To be honest, it stays pretty comfortable in there.  

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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  • 2 months later...

Well, it's been a couple months since I've posted an update on the Rickster, but I've been working on it fairly regularly.  I repaired the front left frame rail that was damaged with the bumper bracket mounting hole torn out.  I've also gotten the engine crossmember replaced, as well as the front crossmember.  I also replaced the core support, left and right front inner fenders, left rear inner fender, and just finished replacing the cowl.  I'll post up some pictures in the next few days.  Now I am working on the drivers side floor pan which needs to be replaed.  All the fiberglass holding the floor pan to the rusted mess underneath is a real pain to clean up.  I thought the seat riser was okay, but under the fiberglass, the rear flange was rusted out.  I also cut out the rusty C-channel subframe connectors that had been welded in with some really, really ugly welds.    

Still, progress is being made.  I am hoping to have it completed before July 1st, next year, so have to keep my nose to the grindstone.  

Ron

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Well, here are some we pictures of the engine compartment with the repaired frame rail, replacement inner aprons, core support,  and crossmembers.

20201025_143205.jpg

20201025_143138.jpg

20201025_143054.jpg

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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Look like you are moving along great. It makes is so much easier when you have a workshop. 
Measure Measure Measure the weld for sure. Glad you rescued some of the pieces off my parts vert to into yours.
I have 4 visitors on Friday afternoon. Three teenage boys and one their dads. We met up on an early Mustang Facebook page. He is only about 40 miles away in S.C. He is working a 1964 1/2 convertible. He did not know what to look for in 64 1/2 parts so he came up to view some of the early parts that I have. The boys were interested in what I was doing in paint room with the 72 vert on the rotisserie. 

I am still restricted on weight so my progress is slow. 
Keep pushing I think you will get done before your plan.
I have not been to Clay's shop since you were here will see him this coming week and will ask if he is interested in the paint.

Cheers,

David

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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Thanks David,  

I hope you heal quickly and get back to full speed soon.

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Share on other sites

Today, I got the cowl finished up.  It was a rusted out mess, as they tend to get over the years.  20200913_164402.thumb.jpg.986656ae4743225afb7ce1491c205ef3.jpg

I got it cut out and the new one drilled and prepped for installation.  I am going to have aftermarket AC, so both cowl vents will be blocked off, so removed them and welded the openings closed.  20200926_115708.thumb.jpg.9c54359f76d5bb612ff82e56a1958386.jpg

I used a piece of 18 g steel and plug welded it underneath, and then finished with a solid weld bead around the inner edge. 

20200927_180109.thumb.jpg.dd9272f77550905c1f22f274b4810376.jpg

After grinding down the weld, I covered it with a couple thin layers of short strand fiberglass body filler to seal any pinholes that might be present, and then a layer of evercoat body filler and sanded it smooth so any water will flow out with no obstructions.  20200930_142720.thumb.jpg.461280902d4b868ffce2615a5f1dfb3b.jpgI put small bits of tape over the holes so I'd have a clean weld and then added small bits of tape to the firewall flange where the welds would be.  I sprayed the underside with epoxy primer, before finally putting it back in and welding in place.  

I drilled my plug welds for the top half, and scuffed the E-coat on the underside of the top half really well, and also scuffed the E-coat for the lower half.  

20201013_182407.thumb.jpg.7c64545e639acb8b4cf969a9046d120c.jpg

The bottom of the top half and top of the bottom half were masked off and sprayed with 2 coats of epoxy primer and finished off with a coat of Chassis Black Satin.  20201019_112247.thumb.jpg.5737cd9985d52026563be860441aa391.jpg20201019_112318.thumb.jpg.186045066ae8a6c20235bd0265801930.jpgI cleaned up the plug weld sites and got the two half clamped together and finished off about 40 plug welds.  After cleaning the plug welds up, I got to work with the cowl extensions.  There was a fair about of rust under the them and the drivers side had seriously rusted the drivers side inner apron (requiring it's replacement).  I used the electrolysis tank to derust them, and then coated the inside with primer before welding them back in.20201025_143104.thumb.jpg.980573f1d345dffe62feb9c2a508a01b.jpg

So there it is.  The cowl has been removed and replaced.  I'll use some seam sealer on the inside seams when I get to that stage, and in the next few weeks should have the engine bay stripped and be ready for a couple coats of epoxy and some paint.  In the mean time, it's on to floor pans.  Wish me luck!!!

 

 

 

 

Edited by 73MustangCoupe
typo
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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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The cowl is probably the toughest so you are down hill from here. Just measure a lot and make sure door opening are still positioned correct before floor weld. 

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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Yesterday, I got started on floor pans.  I started on the drivers side and got the front portion cut out.  I thought I might be able to save the seat riser, but the rear flange was rusted out.  It was covered with fiberglass, so it wasn't seen until I was able to get the wire wheel to it.  

20201026_162844.thumb.jpg.e036d9ffd36a22f0449ce358eff86a05.jpg
 

While cutting the floor pan out, I found that there were actually portions of three floor pans in the back, between the driver side seat riser and the torque box.  

20201029_160748.thumb.jpg.79490f440190806f563b6b86cdfbb692.jpg

Yes, it's a mess.  As I was cleaning all the fiberglass and ropey, snot-looking welds up, I discovered that there someone had sliced the upper portion of the torque box just above the lower row of spot welds.  The rust and damage have to be repaired, but it's kind of a complicated shape and cleaning rust from the inside will be difficult, so I ordered the upper torque box panel from NPD.  It should be here Monday, and I'll get back on it then.

20201029_171019.thumb.jpg.70be8488224ac9d328fc79c50d1f1f78.jpg

20201029_164123.thumb.jpg.5cec4dc4bd539f506ef3d01a467f8162.jpg

In the meantime, I can work on cleaning up the other side to see how bad that side will be.  Also, I can fire up the blasting cabinet and have a field day cleaning up parts to go back on the car later. 

If it isn't one thing, it's another.

Edited by 73MustangCoupe
  • Like 1

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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3 floor pans... if these cars could talk!!

Impressive work you're doing here! Please post many picts of your floor repair as I'll be holding the torch in these regions soon as well! :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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When installing your new floor pans, do you plan to butt weld them in or perform an overlap weld?  Also interested to know what type of welder you are using.

Im brand new to welding, Im looking to buy a mig welder but don't want to make the mistake of buying a piece of junk.

When it comes to joining the box sections to the new floor pan, will you be drilling some small holes in the new floor pan then plug welding the holes to bond with the box sections?  Do you use copper based weld through primer?  

thanks

Edited by 92GTS-R
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12 hours ago, 92GTS-R said:

When installing your new floor pans, do you plan to butt weld them in or perform an overlap weld?  Also interested to know what type of welder you are using.

Im brand new to welding, Im looking to buy a mig welder but don't want to make the mistake of buying a piece of junk.

When it comes to joining the box sections to the new floor pan, will you be drilling some small holes in the new floor pan then plug welding the holes to bond with the box sections?  Do you use copper based weld through primer?  

thanks

I am planning to do a short lap and weld the seam entirely.  On the underside, I'll fill the lap with seam sealer.  I've got an Eastwood 135, and it does okay.  It's a 120V welder, but does a pretty good job on sheet steel and small projects. 

When I install the floor, I'll set it in place, then mark the outside of the underlying frame rails.  when I flip it over, I can mark out where my plug welds will go and drill them out.  I'd suggest watching Barry  at JoDaddy's garage on YouTube.  This one is on floor pan installation, https://youtu.be/lhkA9gzbm38  ,  but he has several hundred videos. He provides a lot of info on rebuilding old Mustangs.  The Jade and Mystique playlists have a ton of useful tips.  

Once I have the holes drilled for the plug welds to the frame rails, I'll prime the both surfaces, but the go back and just remove the primer right around each hole, about 1/2-5/8 inch in diameter.  I was using weld-thru, but looking at the directions, the manufacturer says remove in the area where the weld goes, so I'll just use some self etch or epoxy rather than weld thru.  

Stay tuned.  I should be back on it tomorrow, as the upper torque box panel came in today so I can replace it and then the floor pans.  I'll be sure and take more pictures and post them up with a description of what I've done.

 

 

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, needs a lot of work.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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  • 73MustangCoupe changed the title to The Rickster - a 73 Mach 1 work in progress

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