Jump to content

Poor quality control, factory freaks, or mistakes?


Guest Kit Sullivan
 Share

Recommended Posts

There's a small metal bracket that attaches to the car body at the inner bottom of the quarter window opening, the purpose of which is to hold in place the top of the plastic arm rest panel.

 

One side was missing this bracket so I assumed it had got lost somewhere in the last forty years. When it came time for me to spruce up my floors, I peeled up the factory-installed floor insulation and found the missing bracket on the back floor pressed into the underneath of the insulation.

 

Well that solved the whereabouts of the missing bracket, but when I went to install it I found the hole in the body where it screws onto was malformed from when the panel was pressed (the hole was there but it hadn't broken through), and there was no way to screw the bracket on until I "completed" the hole by drilling it out.

 

So the bracket hadn't been installed at the factory at all - I surmise that the vehicle assembler went to screw it on, found he didn't have a hole to screw it in to, so piffed the bracket onto the rear floor for me to find forty years on! Quite thoughtful of him really.....

 

 

So now your car is no longer factory correct. :)

 

Ha, I guess you are right Mike. However I do class the found bracket as a never-used original Ford "New Old Stock" part... :dodgy:

Brett

phonestang2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 30
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I worked in the automotive stamping business for most of my life and tool & die maker before going into engineering. I laugh about people concerned over the gaps. It does not make the car run better, get better mileage or a safety issue. It is a vanity thing. Give me the quality of the 70's with those prices and I will be in heaven. I could buy 10 new cars for the price of one.

We stamped parts for BMW, Toyota, Ford, Nissan, Mercedes, Chevy, Dodge and others. We also made parts for lawn mowers on the very same equipment with the same quality standards. I have seen new BMW's with horrible alignment between the front fender body lines and the door. When they first made their X5 the bodies would stretch when pulling a trailer and the battery box would drop down in the rear. A quick application of some band aids fixed the issue.

An automobile is not a piece of art or a thing of perfection it is a form of transportation. So if you want perfect you will have to pay someone probably $75,000 to take you car and weld up gaps and massage everything to as good as they can get it but I bet I can still find something not perfect. It probably would not bring half that to sell it. No such thing as a perfect car.

Great discussion get to understand what makes members tick.

David

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I worked in the automotive stamping business for most of my life and tool & die maker before going into engineering. I laugh about people concerned over the gaps. It does not make the car run better, get better mileage or a safety issue. It is a vanity thing. Give me the quality of the 70's with those prices and I will be in heaven. I could buy 10 new cars for the price of one.

We stamped parts for BMW, Toyota, Ford, Nissan, Mercedes, Chevy, Dodge and others. We also made parts for lawn mowers on the very same equipment with the same quality standards. I have seen new BMW's with horrible alignment between the front fender body lines and the door. When they first made their X5 the bodies would stretch when pulling a trailer and the battery box would drop down in the rear. A quick application of some band aids fixed the issue.

An automobile is not a piece of art or a thing of perfection it is a form of transportation. So if you want perfect you will have to pay someone probably $75,000 to take you car and weld up gaps and massage everything to as good as they can get it but I bet I can still find something not perfect. It probably would not bring half that to sell it. No such thing as a perfect car.

Great discussion get to understand what makes members tick.

David

 

I look at these cars as a piece of history and laugh at people trying to make them perfect as you say. Cars of this era were never perfect or even close to perfect and for guys doing restorations with that goal in mind I feel they are taking from the historical value of the car. I love our cars and cars of the 60s and 70s in general with all of their faults and imperfections. Same goes with paint work 3stage super paint jobs almost look out of place on cars of this era. My car has a single stage urethane paint that has held up well considering I painted it myself in 1992.

Going fast is fun but life is short so slow down and enjoy the ride :D Frank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The following thread really adds to this one...

Lots of good stuff including the interview from a Ford Assembly line worker who worked around 1972.

Really interesting.

 

http://www.7173mustangs.com/thread-early-70-s-ford-production

 

Ray

1971 Boss 351  

1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 

1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 

1971 Hardtop (parts car)

1973 Mach 1 (parts car)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a small metal bracket that attaches to the car body at the inner bottom of the quarter window opening, the purpose of which is to hold in place the top of the plastic arm rest panel.

 

One side was missing this bracket so I assumed it had got lost somewhere in the last forty years. When it came time for me to spruce up my floors, I peeled up the factory-installed floor insulation and found the missing bracket on the back floor pressed into the underneath of the insulation.

 

Well that solved the whereabouts of the missing bracket, but when I went to install it I found the hole in the body where it screws onto was malformed from when the panel was pressed (the hole was there but it hadn't broken through), and there was no way to screw the bracket on until I "completed" the hole by drilling it out.

 

So the bracket hadn't been installed at the factory at all - I surmise that the vehicle assembler went to screw it on, found he didn't have a hole to screw it in to, so piffed the bracket onto the rear floor for me to find forty years on! Quite thoughtful of him really.....

 

 

So now your car is no longer factory correct. :)

 

Probably is missing one of the factory rattles too.

spacer.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Painted my son's 96 Ranger last year due to thick flaking paint and heavy cracking of the hood paint. He was the original owner, nothing ever done except a clutch install. It had nine coats of teal body color with nine alternating coats of grey primer on the hood and roof. No wonder it was flaking and cracking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...