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Why such negativity?


Guest Kit Sullivan
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Yeah... I'm not too proud of the fact that I paid $1600 for mine. But at the time, I was one of those "low-information buyers," and could only see "don't even have to leave town to pick it up" past the "Mach 1 Goggles." The seller was one of those Fast & Loud wannabes, and after all said and done, I at least got him down to what he paid for it (seized engine carries a LOT of negotiating power for the buyer, after all). :blush:

 

San Angelo is literally 90 miles from anywhere else in the middle of nowhere, and 230-ish away from any of the 'big market' areas (San Antonio, Austin, DFW...). I guess technically mine was an impulse buy, but it's not like there was anything else being locally advertised.

Eric

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Yeah... I'm not too proud of the fact that I paid $1600 for mine. But at the time, I was one of those "low-information buyers," and could only see "don't even have to leave town to pick it up" past the "Mach 1 Goggles." The seller was one of those Fast & Loud wannabes, and after all said and done, I at least got him down to what he paid for it (seized engine carries a LOT of negotiating power for the buyer, after all). :blush:

 

Feel good about it. I was suckered into that yellow car for $2,650 + $400 in transport costs.

 

-Kurt

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How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:

Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.

Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.

Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.

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Oh trust me - I'm good with it all. But I'm with you, if my experience can save someone else a lot of hassle (by pointing out problems and arming them with more information going into a deal), then all the negativity is for the greater good.

 

 

And Kit - quit trying to hijack your own thread with all that late '80s Lincoln nonsense. rofl

 

(Just kidding brutha - it's all good)

Eric

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Check this one out... I have no idea if this is BS or not but $28K... really. This could be a good example of another idiot seller trying rip some one off.

 

http://m.autotrader.com/cars-for-sale/vehicledetails.xhtml?listingId=375380896&numRecords=15&firstRecord=1&zip=29910&searchType

 

That's a Mark VII PPG Pace Car. One-off, I believe.

 

-Kurt

satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png

How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:

Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.

Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.

Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.

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Guest Kit Sullivan

The LSCs didn't get respectably powerful until '87, when the 5.0 HOs were installed. Still and all, they are basically mid-16 second cars. Typical of cars of its era. Today that is embarrasingly slow.

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The LSCs didn't get respectably powerful until '87, when the 5.0 HOs were installed. Still and all, they are basically mid-16 second cars. Typical of cars of its era. Today that is embarrasingly slow.

 

I've owned two - both '89 year models. For their day they were very spirited and well balanced cars. I used to loose most other cars in cloverleafs when they thought they could 'hang' with me in the corners. I was sure hard on the tires!!!!! :) Performance wise they were decent and they were a ton of fun on the highway!

Ray

1971 Boss 351  

1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 

1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 

1971 Hardtop (parts car)

1973 Mach 1 (parts car)

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I had a 1993 cobra back in the day and it was a ton of fun to drive. It handled unbelievably well. Back tires never lasted long though!!! I drove a little silly in that thing! 22 year old kid that probably shouldn't of had a car that fast LOL!!

 

Also heres a CL for a 73 convert. that about 20min from me.

 

http://pittsburgh.craigslist.org/cto/4545659525.html

Kevin
1971 Mach 1

408C Stroker - C4 w/3,000 stall - 8.8" Rear w/3.73's - Disc brakes all way around.

 

 

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You can't disagree with Dana or Kurt when it comes to obvious scammers. Unfortunately, again as a side-effect of our level of '71-'73 Mustang education, our B.S. meters are more finely tuned to the tricks out there regarding our models.

 

Notice the decent cars being commented on - not as much negativity as pointing out flaws for virtual negotiating purposes - there's nothing wrong with getting the best deal. The turds on the other hand, game on. If you see a $400 parts car going for $8500 with the comments, "Ultra-rare 1973 Boss 429 Mach 1 Convertible," raise that B.S. flag.

 

Nothing wrong with calling a scammer a scammer. As long as it's done in a manner that fits within the guidelines of posting in these forums - bring it on. If our negativity saves even one person from getting saddled with completely lost cause, it's worth it.

 

One thing I personally hate seeing is a "low-mileage" and/or rare car that's been left to rot going for high dollars. I mean, who gives a crap if it's a 1 of 50 '67 Cobra Jet with only 178 miles on it? If it's been left outside in the elements, is more rust than metal, and is missing all the important stuff that made it so rare, it ain't worth it. If it looks anything like that Pantera or my '71 did when I bought it (or worse), it's not worth 5-digit money... let alone the 6-digits I'm sure the buyer paid for it. Those kinds of 'Rare Finds' are also part of what's so bad for the Average Joe just looking for a project car with hopes of having a nice cruiser some day.

 

LOL having a post by an average Joe is suspect when he or she promotes the sale to endear your emotions to his or her cause. It reminds me of my wife arguing with me to buy the RV a couple of weeks ago. The picture and description were of a very nice photo of said RV. The script was of the need to sell because the person and their dear husband had enjoyed this beautiful well maintained unit for years. After his death she only wanted to offer the RV to a warm loving family that would love it as much as they did.

 

So I called on it. She was SO nice!!! She had sent the unit to Ebay Motors Transportation to assist with delivery and ensure a quality transaction with the new owner.

 

67 Diamond Blue Vert

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRveIaRU6OAzTfd2Mv6ypGH49BZcPU7MS_7PBKhiOmpmJJrHJ_B_Q

 

DUDE

 

LOL even my sig line offended somebody!

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  • 2 months later...

I have noticed lately that there seems to be a lot of negative comments on the forum aimed at ads on CL and other places about cars for sale and what pieces of junk they are. In a hobby that is based around 45+ year-old cars that were not really very rust-resistant to begin with, there are bound to be some less-than-pristine examples out there. Every time a rusted-out hulk or modified-to-hell car is sold to someone for stupid money, I figure it can only drive the value of nicer examples even higher! We all benefit that way!

 

I was looking for another thread and found this again. But it reminded me of that cat selling the Mach I that was posting from Lafayette (according to his location information) and the car was in a small town in Texas 220 miles away, (which I noted that you have to be from there to even know it exist) and posted to the Shreveport CL which is 212 miles away. he just loved our little forum and us (he had maybe 3 post but regrettably had to sell his Mach I).....but he disappeared. I guess it was my fault...cuz I happily called him out.

 

67 Diamond Blue Vert

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRveIaRU6OAzTfd2Mv6ypGH49BZcPU7MS_7PBKhiOmpmJJrHJ_B_Q

 

DUDE

 

LOL even my sig line offended somebody!

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kit....looking forward to the day 7173 mustangs start to shoot up in value its time to get the respect and value these car deserve,thats why you buy cars in the classic car market before they go for high prices,its called getting in early on the market....for prices on used parts geting pricey thats the collector business,were still so far behind on value on our years 7173.

DRIVE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT*****KEEP YOUR FOOT ON THE PEDAL

 

Ron

 

1972 mustang convertible

2005 mustang convertible

1999 mustang convertible white (sold)

1994 mustang convertible white (sold)

2008 ford edge copper

2006 cadillac cts radaint bronze

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kit....looking forward to the day 7173 mustangs start to shoot up in value its time to get the respect and value these car deserve,thats why you buy cars in the classic car market before they go for high prices,its called getting in early on the market....for prices on used parts geting pricey thats the collector business,were still so far behind on value on our years 7173.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTgfuAY_bIoJeTwFH3a4-1PLOkdLTOJkg2DpOnKCRAapLA6zEti

 

hmmmm ..... I knew you and KIT 'd be friends.....hmmmmmm

 

67 Diamond Blue Vert

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRveIaRU6OAzTfd2Mv6ypGH49BZcPU7MS_7PBKhiOmpmJJrHJ_B_Q

 

DUDE

 

LOL even my sig line offended somebody!

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Until your trying to get parts and you are priced out of the market by the latest resto craze. Just sayin I understand but it is a double edged knife. Seen it happen with various cars that were hot all of a sudden.

 

My dad is having a hell of a time getting parts for the 67 Ford Galaxie he is restoring. Because dudes with buckets of money are pricing him right out of the market for usable parts.

 

I have a neat option for one of those it's an am 8 track indash with factory bezel and 4 speaker setup with fader I pulled at a pick n pull a few years ago from a realy nice car it also has a fader setup the front speakers bolt under the dash. It is complete except for knobs. For the 67 galaxies. I think I have pics in my photobucket.


The thing you guys are missing is timing of what to buy and when to buy it. 71-73 Mustangs are nevermore to be just a cheap used car that almost anyone can finda decent example for low cost.

The trick is to buy a future-collectible before the low-forhead collectors latch on to them and start snapping them up.

 

Here is my tip for anyone who wants an awesome future-collectable for mere pocket-change:

87-92 Lincoln Mk-VII LSC.

 

Beautiful body style, great option content. Best of all? 5.0 HO engine. The ONLY car other than the Mustang GT that Ford ever put the 225 horse 5.0 in.

Full Mustang GT-style suspension, fabulous sport seats, great gauges, handles great, quick for its era

 

These cars retailed for $28,000- $32,000 when new...today a good condition, pampered example can easily be had for $1000 or less.

 

I have THREE of them...all bought for less than $800 each, all in great condition.

 

It is a great car to drive and to collect.

 

Dont be sorry in ten years and say nobody told you...

Kit I too have had 2 of the LSC's and agree they are great cars with good mileage to boot!

 

Just looked these up as I had no idea what they looked like. I'd drive 1 for $800:cool: I think they are at that point that they are just old enough for the styling to be interesting again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am just here to eat my lunch and screw stuff up!!!!!lollerz

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kit....looking forward to the day 7173 mustangs start to shoot up in value its time to get the respect and value these car deserve,thats why you buy cars in the classic car market before they go for high prices,its called getting in early on the market....for prices on used parts geting pricey thats the collector business,were still so far behind on value on our years 7173.

 

If you want to make money that way, I suggest the stock market. It's more predictable.

 

That, and if you do make a windfall on your '72 convertible, remember this: You'll never get a chance to buy another cheap to flip again.

 

You'll also never get a chance to own one again purely for fun, even if you can afford it. There'll always be a little voice in the back of your head freaking out about wear, accidents, road crud leading to rust...

 

I have a neighbor with a '69 Shelby GT350 convertible. Was wrecked 10 years ago; he finally put it back together. Drove it a lot a few months ago. Soon as he put the stripes on it and polished it up, it disappeared into the garage.

 

-Kurt

satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png

How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:

Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.

Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.

Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.

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Guest Kit Sullivan

These cars ( along with all collector cars in general) peaked in value in the late 80s/ early 90s then cooled considerably throughout the 2000's.

They have now started to climb again, but are not quite to thier previous highest levels.

But...they are on thier way. The "50 years old" status now puts them into the "nice antique car" category, a higher echelon of appreciation and value than just the "nice old car" category they existed in previously.

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I have seen way too many owners of nice collectible cars loose the desire to enjoy their cars because of increased value. It is a two sided coin; for one the cars appreciate in value and offer some pride to the owner, knowing they made such a great investment. On the other side they are forced to realize if they ever want to capture that financial gain, the car will require the highest level of care and protection. One small door dent in a fully restored Shelby could cost a seller $4k off the sale price. A chipped,

date-coded Carlite windshield could cost over $1,000 to replace - maybe more! It becomes scary for them to actually drive their cars just thinking about what might happen. The more one invests in their cars with time and money, the more careful they are with them.

I respect anyone's vehicle. Heck I about fell out of my 96 Buick daily driver trying to hold the door in high wind to not dent an older Dodge mini pickup with faded paint and hail dents! Just too many years of habit trying to not dent other's vehicles...

 

Ray

1971 Boss 351  

1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 

1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 

1971 Hardtop (parts car)

1973 Mach 1 (parts car)

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kurt im not trying to sell my mustang.

 

who makes money in the stock market anymore not the working man!

 

i said i can;t wait for the value to go up like other classics.

 

im going to bow out of saying anything any more on this site don;t want to hurt any ones feeling was not my intensions.

 

 

 

 

kit....looking forward to the day 7173 mustangs start to shoot up in value its time to get the respect and value these car deserve,thats why you buy cars in the classic car market before they go for high prices,its called getting in early on the market....for prices on used parts geting pricey thats the collector business,were still so far behind on value on our years 7173.

 

If you want to make money that way, I suggest the stock market. It's more predictable.

 

That, and if you do make a windfall on your '72 convertible, remember this: You'll never get a chance to buy another cheap to flip again.

 

You'll also never get a chance to own one again purely for fun, even if you can afford it. There'll always be a little voice in the back of your head freaking out about wear, accidents, road crud leading to rust...

 

I have a neighbor with a '69 Shelby GT350 convertible. Was wrecked 10 years ago; he finally put it back together. Drove it a lot a few months ago. Soon as he put the stripes on it and polished it up, it disappeared into the garage.

 

-Kurt

DRIVE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT*****KEEP YOUR FOOT ON THE PEDAL

 

Ron

 

1972 mustang convertible

2005 mustang convertible

1999 mustang convertible white (sold)

1994 mustang convertible white (sold)

2008 ford edge copper

2006 cadillac cts radaint bronze

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kit....looking forward to the day 7173 mustangs start to shoot up in value its time to get the respect and value these car deserve,thats why you buy cars in the classic car market before they go for high prices,its called getting in early on the market....for prices on used parts geting pricey thats the collector business,were still so far behind on value on our years 7173.

 

If you want to make money that way, I suggest the stock market. It's more predictable.

 

That, and if you do make a windfall on your '72 convertible, remember this: You'll never get a chance to buy another cheap to flip again.

 

You'll also never get a chance to own one again purely for fun, even if you can afford it. There'll always be a little voice in the back of your head freaking out about wear, accidents, road crud leading to rust...

 

I have a neighbor with a '69 Shelby GT350 convertible. Was wrecked 10 years ago; he finally put it back together. Drove it a lot a few months ago. Soon as he put the stripes on it and polished it up, it disappeared into the garage.

 

-Kurt

 

well stated....the only people thinking these cars are an "investment" grade is the guys trying to sell some fool with too much money one at an auction. An auctioneer will tell you whatever you want to hear for his seller. Personally being in the market for a convertible I haven't seen one yet that I think is worth more than 15k

 

http://houston.craigslist.org/cto/4660318743.html

 

this car is near the ranch and I stopped and checked it out. sloppy work cheezy tires etc etc. Somebody with little knowledge following the auctions and watching Counting Cars, AzzMonkey will think they got a bargain.

 

67 Diamond Blue Vert

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRveIaRU6OAzTfd2Mv6ypGH49BZcPU7MS_7PBKhiOmpmJJrHJ_B_Q

 

DUDE

 

LOL even my sig line offended somebody!

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kurt im not trying to sell my mustang never said i wanted to sell it and make money.

 

who makes money in the stock market anymore not the working man!

 

all said was i can;t wait for the value to go up like other classics.

 

im going to bow out of saying anything any more on this site don;t want to hurt any ones feeling that was not my intensions.

 

thanks for everyone who helped me out thru out the years with my mustang some great people on this site.

 

no hard feelings.

 

 

 

kit....looking forward to the day 7173 mustangs start to shoot up in value its time to get the respect and value these car deserve,thats why you buy cars in the classic car market before they go for high prices,its called getting in early on the market....for prices on used parts geting pricey thats the collector business,were still so far behind on value on our years 7173.

 

If you want to make money that way, I suggest the stock market. It's more predictable.

 

That, and if you do make a windfall on your '72 convertible, remember this: You'll never get a chance to buy another cheap to flip again.

 

You'll also never get a chance to own one again purely for fun, even if you can afford it. There'll always be a little voice in the back of your head freaking out about wear, accidents, road crud leading to rust...

 

I have a neighbor with a '69 Shelby GT350 convertible. Was wrecked 10 years ago; he finally put it back together. Drove it a lot a few months ago. Soon as he put the stripes on it and polished it up, it disappeared into the garage.

 

-Kurt

DRIVE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT*****KEEP YOUR FOOT ON THE PEDAL

 

Ron

 

1972 mustang convertible

2005 mustang convertible

1999 mustang convertible white (sold)

1994 mustang convertible white (sold)

2008 ford edge copper

2006 cadillac cts radaint bronze

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I don't think he was calling you out in particular, Ron... just making the point that cars in general are not good money-making ventures.

 

Edit: Although, I did have a chance to buy one of those "investment quality" cars right after I bought my pile. It was a '71 M-Code, but otherwise almost identical to mine... and almost perfect in every way. Started at $25K (when I looked at it), and finally sold to someone in San Angelo for around $19K. Someone out of town paid a little more of it a few years later. You know what? I never saw that car again after it left the place I saw it - the local owner stuffed it in his garage, and I never saw it at shows, parades, or anything - then, an ad online later, and it was gone forever.

 

But - those cars are getting fewer and farther between. Unfortunately, the dedicated flippers haven't figured out what reality actually is.

Eric

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My dad and I have made plenty of cash flipping classic cars once and a while. What i see wrong with most car flippers, they go after only a few styles . I seen my dad get a 1960 caddy hearse for 2000 bucks 2006ish, he sold it for 22,000 on ebay just 3 months later ....Cars can be a great investment, if you plan on just moving it down the road and not stuck on just a few types. and not be attached to them, Best to stay out of styles you really care about..lol" plus have room to store them" Good thing i live i the desert and got plenty of land..lol

 

But as for 71-73's as a great car to flip? maybe if you get amazing price for it..But that will be hard in our years now days,, They are more respected now and people tend to think they are worth more than they really are. This is not the type of car i would be looking at to flip money on..Back when i was in high school i got mine for 1500, i had offers over 10,000 and turned them all down, but if i would of pilled them up a round my house for 1500 back in school?..Sure thing i could of made some money down the road on them.

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My dad and I have made plenty of cash flipping classic cars once and a while. What i see wrong with most car flippers, they go after only a few styles . I seen my dad get a 1960 caddy hearse for 2000 bucks 2006ish, he sold it for 22,000 on ebay just 3 months later ....Cars can be a great investment, if you plan on just moving it down the road and not stuck on just a few types. and not be attached to them, Best to stay out of styles you really care about..lol" plus have room to store them" Good thing i live i the desert and got plenty of land..lol

 

But as for 71-73's as a great car to flip? maybe if you get amazing price for it..But that will be hard in our years now days,, They are more respected now and people tend to think they are worth more than they really are. This is not the type of car i would be looking at to flip money on..Back when i was in high school i got mine for 1500, i had offers over 10,000 and turned them all down, but if i would of pilled them up a round my house for 1500 back in school?..Sure thing i could of made some money down the road on them.

 

:D yep... I've made more money on Miata, Honda and my all time favorites....a 1999 Ford van, 1500 retailed at 3000 used it for a year and SOLD, a 1996 Buick land yacht. Bought her for 1500 and sold for 4500. Now it took marketing to a Brutha but hey I knew who to market it too. Saw it a few months later and YES....big ole 22's on it. I was happy and so was he. OH and I used it as a work car till it sold BINGO.

 

67 Diamond Blue Vert

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRveIaRU6OAzTfd2Mv6ypGH49BZcPU7MS_7PBKhiOmpmJJrHJ_B_Q

 

DUDE

 

LOL even my sig line offended somebody!

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The biggest problem with flipping our cars, is the expense and limited availability of replacement parts. That, and the market value is not congruent with the "Vintage Mustangs" ('64.5-'68 especially - even '69-'70 don't share the replacement parts market success as the earlier models).

 

Based on initial investment (purchase price), additional investment (parts, labor, services, and materials), and final sale price, there is not a lot of room for "profit," bounced against fair market value of the car - so you're better off not using '71-'73 Mustangs as any kind of market venture, is what Kurt was trying to say. ;) :D

 

Getting a nice car for cheap, spending more in sweat equity than cash for replacement parts, and the fair market value and/or sale price bringing in a decent profit is the lesser frequent occurrence these days.

 

As well, the recent exposure on Counting Cars and Fast & Loud certainly hasn't hurt, but those two completely different shows have had their own impact. I believe there is more respect for Count's Kustoms, as they aren't trying to be anything they aren't - they're a high-end custom shop and are honest about their work being expensive. Gas Monkey Garage, however, misrepresents in the worst way (shoots for ridiculous profit, claims more invested than reality, claims more done than reality) - they are the worst possible publicity for flippers, bordering on being dishonest IMHO. Don't get me wrong, Gas Monkey Garage has the potential to do a lot of nice work... but the "show" has gotten in the way of that, IMHO. Unfortunately, everybody expecting to turn a profit on flipping a "classic car" is starting to look our way, which is also driving the prices up... but in a bit of a negative manner.

Eric

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