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Roof rail clip


cigarguy
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It holds the window in place when fully rolled up. There are two on each side. You can buy repro ones of these if needed.

 

 

 

Hey All, here's a pic of of my '71 Mach 1. I can't figure out what that clip along the roof rail is for. It doesn't look like any trim is missing.

Jeff

1972 Q Code Convertible

 

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They have a thin rubberized black coating like plasticoat on them but when you buy them they are just metal. You need this coating to keep the windows from squeaking when rolled up.

-john

(jbojo)

351C 4V cc heads, 10.5 : 1 CR, 290 Herbert cam, Flat top forged pistons, forged connecting rods, Atomic efi,

C6 with Gear Vendor overdrive, 3.89 Tru Trac, Hooker Super Comp with 2 1/2" Pypes Exhaust.        

 

Some Mod pictures can be seen at: [button=http://www.7173mustangs.com/forum-garage?filterxt_uid=2026]Bojo's Garage[/button]

 

 

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I need these also. Has anyone used the plasticoat stuff on the clips? Does it hold up or wear easily? The reason I ask is because the clips are riveted on, so once there on you can't get them off if you need to recoat them. Ryan

1973 Mach 1, Porsche Guards Red, 429/C6

1972 Mach 1, Grabber Blue, 302/C4, currently under construction

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As described above, they are a window anti-rattle clip.

You can plasti-dip the new one and they come out almost like original.

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I would powdercoat them instead. The plastidip doesn't hold us long term and can easily be rubbed off.

 

There are some coatings like Cerakote and Duracote used in the firearm industry, but I would suspect having a local powdercoater doing it would be cheaper.

http://www.7173mustangs.com/gallery/1_01_07_15_8_53_18.png

 

"I love my Hookers!" and "Get some Strange" probably have a different connotation to non automotive enthusiasts!

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They used the plastic dip to prevent scratching the glass. It sort of guides the glass against the rubber and keeps it there at speed. They tend to push out at speed. I have not tried the little cans of dip you can get at hardware but worth a shot. They lasted 42 years powder coat would probably not last as long but would be better than rust.

Some of the cars now roll the window down when you open and close the door automatic to get the window into the seal. Just more stuff to go wrong.

The two little rivets might be hard to find so you might clean it up on the stainless strip and brush some of the dip on. excellent candidate for molasses tank. Will clean the rust and not hurt any paint left.

Would be a good time to clean up under the strip and reseal before you get rust in the roof.

David

DSC_2004.thumb.JPG.045a41f969ddebbc8dc80c9049728f09.JPG

DSC_2005.thumb.JPG.5e81c0e75abf15fb0d8f150633e7ba42.JPG

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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When I did mine about 15 years ago, I used the liquid electrical coating. They sell it next to the electrical tape at Advance Auto. They came out nice and haven't come apart.

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When I did mine about 15 years ago, I used the liquid electrical coating. They sell it next to the electrical tape at Advance Auto. They came out nice and haven't come apart.

 

Sounds like a great solution will get some.

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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pop rivets

Be careful the 71-3 trim is aluminum not stainless

I bought the reproduction clips and dipped them in the Plasti Dip tool handle stuff that I thinned down with Xylene. It coated great, cured great, and looks great! Re-attached with pop-rivets. I am pretty picky, but very happy with the way that part of the car turned out!

145914262_WindowClips.JPG.4f7850360e11c2adb6874017384835d5.JPG

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When riveting, because you need this to be very flat. I typically knock the draw pin out and shape the rivet with a few punches then hammer the rivet flat holding the two pieces.

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When riveting, because you need this to be very flat. I typically knock the draw pin out and shape the rivet with a few punches then hammer the rivet flat holding the two pieces.

 

Is there a technique to keeping everything tight? I've had mixed results when I try to flatten an aluminum pop rivet.

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