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351 engine tear down


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I have thanks. Just need to grind the valve seats before rebuild the heads.

Then I need piston rings, crankshaft main bearings and I should have all what is needed to rebuild the engine.

Mustang, beer and rock'nroll

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  • 1 year later...

Hi, is this Mallory kit will work on my 351 C Q code engine with a camshaft same as the original one?

Thanks.

58691973-10219683067973045-418182823669661696-n.jpg

 

59526386-10219683068293053-6952497809551523840-n.jpg

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It will work but has no vacuum advance so you will give up some gas mileage. Make sure the distributor gear is compatible with the cam gear. Chuck

https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2009/07/properly-matching-your-camshaft-and-distributor-gear/

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So my main concern is to know if the distributor gear is compatible with the cam gear.

For the rest, you mean that without vacuum advance I should burn more fuel?

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So, still need camshaft bearings:

Sealed Power 1403M or Clevite SH710S.

 

Rod bearings:

Sealed Power 83400CP or 3400CP.

0,010 undersize.

 

Crankshaft main bearings:

Sealed Power 4925M or 146M.

0,010 undersize.

 

The bypass tube is already removed, pinhole on it, need a new one.

 

Any though about what I should choose?

 

Here is the block before and after a cleaning job:

 

On those main bearings, At our shop, we stock the Clevite bearings, and, they are very good bearings. For use with the stock cast iron crank, I'd stick with the "P" series, which are standard 77 material. The "H" series means hardened, and likely not necessary with a soft crank , still, a good bearing. Personally, I like, (and run in my Mach and my Ford powered ski flatbottom boat ), the Sealed Power "M" series, like the 146M noted above. The 146M bearings are a competition bearing material, and are 3/4 grooved sets, that is, unlike the Clevite set which has a fully grooved upper shell in the block and a non-grooved lower shell for load carrying, the 146M sets have an upper fully grooved and a lower which has partial grooves close to the halves parting line giving more oil available to supply the rod bearings but solid bearing material at the bottom where the most load is concentrated.

The Sealed Power 3/4 groove design is of the very same design used in modern performance engines today, notably the Chevrolet LS series being but just one of those utilizing this 3/4 groove technology.

That heater hose nipple is always something we will replace whenever we are working on a customer's block. They are pressed in to the block. Often, they are so damaged or rusty that removing the darned thing takes some patience, but not a big deal. Most auto parts stores have the nipple listed in their heater/ air conditioning parts books. Also, when cleaning the block, have your shop remove the oil galley plugs, front and rear, and have them rifle-brush those passageways clean. Note, that the front allen plugs are a special thread and are slighty "pointy" on their back side. DON'T misplace or loose these, as they are special to the front oil galleys behind the timing gear. Just a little thing, but nobody has mentioned that difference in the galley plugs thus far. 

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That is correct on both counts. Chuck

 

Thanks. So for the moment I keep the stock distributor and later will see with ignition conversion kit.

Mustang, beer and rock'nroll

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  • 3 months later...

Experimentation I would say as I never been so far in a restoration.

A lot of crap wason the heads, and under the pan valley, surely caused by a very poor maintenance. When I opened the engine last evening, the smell remind me some location with H2S, but no I was not on a job.

I have a few push rods bented.

 

Any suggestions are welcome, I need to refer to books and documentation I have to continue the job, and of course the help of this site ::thumb::

 

 

 

 

 

What engine code was this?

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Look up Pertronix.  They have some nice electronic ignition products.

I have been running the Pertronix II in the factory distributor for years , and have had no issues. Starts everytime and runs great.

 

I did try a Pertronix III unit a year ago, it failed after 15 minutes, on the freeway, had the car towed home and put the "II" unit back in. I don't know what the issue was, something in my install, or a bad III unit, but I tossed it into the trash. No problems ever with the Pertronix II.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello guys,

 

Can I use a 10.5" clutch disk for a 351C or 11" is the right one?

I have a Lakewood 15200 bellhousing and don't know exactly what I can use as flywheel and clutch. I found a MTF4 flywheel not far where I live

 

https://www.cjponyparts.com/flywheel-cast-iron-164t-28-oz-manual-transmission-302-351w-351c-1969-1973/p/MTF4/

 

Thanks

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Hello guys,

 

Can I use a 10.5" clutch disk for a 351C or 11" is the right one?

I have a  Lakewood 15200 bellhousing and don't know exactly what I can use as flywheel and clutch. I found a MTF4 flywheel not far where I live

 

https://www.cjponyparts.com/flywheel-cast-iron-164t-28-oz-manual-transmission-302-351w-351c-1969-1973/p/MTF4/

 

Thanks

 

The Lakewood blowshield can be used with the 157th or 164th flywheel. It has starter positions for both. I personally would keep with the 11" clutch. That MTF-4 flywheel looks to be drilled for both the 10.5" and 11" pressure plate.

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

73 heads with 2.05/1.65 valves and 71 heads with 2.19/1.71 valves, both are open chambers.

knowing that I found this pair of 71 cylinder heads for cheap, the guides are ok, but that I already had the valve guides and reinforced seats installed on the 73s.

What would be your choice, and why?

73 351C 4V heads 4 bolts main.

heads.jpg

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I'd stick with the 73 heads.  You've already got work done on them, and they will flow plenty of air for the cam you're using.  Unless you are going with a much larger than stock cam, the 73 heads will flow plenty of air to max out the power your cam will allow.  

 

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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The camshaft will be very close as the stock one, so yes, it's a good point to keep my stock heads.

Mustang, beer and rock'nroll

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Posted (edited)

I like to use correct-oem parts.... I would use your heads...

Those heads can simply be opened to the 2.19 IN, & 1.71 EX  [pic is a D3 4V head opened up]   BUT a 2.19 1.65 is a better combo for a stockfish build.

If you want to stay stockish, Manley makes two valves that work great for flow... 

A 2.08 Pro Flow Race Chevy, correct length for 351C 4V/2V 2.05 sized [with old heads that have had valve jobs over time it helps to increase size just a very little to get valve back to correct depth], and an EX 1.655 extreme duty.  PM if interested.

 

Screen Shot 2021-05-30 at 7.07.51 AM.png

Edited by Q1SVT
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  • 4 weeks later...

Here is the engine block back from the mechanic. I must have almost all the spare parts to rebuild this engine. I'll now need patience and methodology to be able to reassemble everything in good order and above all to start it, it will be my best gift. I'll be free in two weeks and then I'll be able to start the reassembly.

IMG_20210627_151031.jpg

IMG_20210627_151041.jpg

IMG_20210627_151048.jpg

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Mustang, beer and rock'nroll

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I would "cone" the valve guides for more flow and blend the bowls. Also take a round burr in a drill and remove any casting sand in the chambers, don't polish them just hit the rough looking spots. Also the short side radius on the intakes is very sharp, round it a little. Headers and free flowing exhaust will make massive improvements even with a small cam. I would use the small valves, they are the right size for 2v ports. I have a 2v cleveland with those cast pistons and a cam so small I have to shift at 5000 rpm in a 73 mustang with manual trans and 4.11 rear end. Have to shift into 3rd to get 0-60. I did a 5.65 0-60 with a big backfire in first gear. Should be close to 5.3 with a clean run.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just clean, clean, clean. All the oil passages over and over. Wash with brake cleaner and also hot soapy water. Run a tap in every threaded hole to clean them out. When you wash spray down with WD-40 to prevent rust.
When you put the heads on be sure you put the head gaskets on correct. They will be marked FRONT. Pay no attention to the mfg. logos they mean nothing on correct install. One of the most common mistakes in engine build.

Also read the Ford manual on the cam bearing install. The front bearing is critical on the depth. You might want to install oil control plugs in the system. Depends on what you use it for. Not racing you can be more lax. If racing details will kill or make you.

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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  • 1 month later...

Manu how much do you pay for the cleaning and machining of the engine (i'm french too you Can tell the Price in euro )

 

Thanks for your answer

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Why don't I know enuff ???????.. all I know is that is a 4 bolt mains Cleveland :classic_dry:

But when it comes to stripping down engines and making them perfect - I have as much knowledge and talent as a chair leg. :classic_wink:
What comp cam is best (numbers) - - how to adjust the mechanical/electrical timing to suit - what plenum? - what carb? what headers?  ,... etc...etc ... :classic_sad: how do you know what to use? 

You guys just seem to naturally know ... Frieberger and Finnegan on Roadkill make it look and sound so easy.  :classic_huh:

...so what is the best set up to make a Cleveland 351 spin the planet the other way ? :help:  and make my neighbours move to another country? 

 

 

 

Edited by 1sostatic

sig2.jpg

Enjoy's searching out 71-73 history

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With me, I started tearing engines apart and rebuilding them when I was 12 years old (started with lawnmowers and go karts) and evolved into motorcycles and cars when I was 15 or 16. Back then cam choice was easier, basically 3/4 race or full race for us normal guys.

I still do a lot of research and reading, still learning about what makes these beasts perform right. And, I do watch Engine Builders, even as much as those guys know, they still seem to learn things when they run them on the dyno. I like Frieberger, he's the first to say "That's not what I expected."

Part of the problem is, there are no absolutes. Changing one thing, like the length of the collector on the headers can make the carburetor run richer or leaner. Even changing to a different make of dual plane single 4-barrel carburetor intake will change engine response. 

What works best for me is to generalize (ball-park figures) what I'm going to start with, then fine tune items, like carburetor brand and size, camshaft (roller, flat tappet, lift, duration, lobe separation, etc.), head choice (chamber, valve size, port size, etc.), pistons (flat top, domed, dished, valve reliefs, etc.) and so on. Some of this is controlled by what is available. Custom ground camshafts are about the only thing that are reasonable.

Sometimes before I answer a question on the forum I will do additional research before answering, just to make sure, the last thing I want to do is to steer someone wrong. I try to do a little mentoring, lay out choices and what may happen with each one, to get the questioner to think about it and do some of their own research.

Rebuilding an engine back to stock is the easiest, but where's the fun in that?

Mistakes are very expensive, research and following procedures are the best way to avoid them. No short cuts, ever, don't listen to the buddy down the block that says that's not necessary. Save the adult thirst quenchers until finished for the day.

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“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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"Save the adult thirst quenchers until finished for the day." Especially good advice! As to how we know these things, my experience is Much like Don C. I started working on cars at 14, first Hot Rod engine at 17 (390 4v). I've built several since then. I'd like to do more but I don't have a Bezos budget. I figure out how the car will be used, what performance level I want, and can afford, how the rest of the car will need to be adjusted to match the engine output, and then a LOT of research. Accurate empirical data from trusted sources is best, and then vet that if possible. There is a lot of nonsense out there today that will lead you down the road to ruin in a short minute. Chuck

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