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Upper control arm shaft replacement


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Pastel Blue,

 

The o-rings should go on the shaft and slide to the bolt holes. They are suppose to help retain the grease in the bushings.

 

mustang7173

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mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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Guest Pastel Blue

Tried that Judge initially... They were much to big to even attempt to squeeze them in. As luck would have it, NPD sent me two supposedly the same shafts. The packaging and their product # looked the same, but the shafts had some differences. The seal, was new and imo, improved and actually covered over the top of the shaft, much better design. The other seal was the o-ring variety. Time will not allow me to send them back and get two matching, as I need to get these on the car so it can get rolling for paint finishing.

 

Just a heads up for others contemplating this job, get the one's with the seal that actually fits over the end of the shaft, encapsulating it.

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Pastel Blue,

 

I did the shaft kit one time and it came apart on me. Not sure what I did wrong. It is possible for to just get new arms? I ask this due to possible fatigue of the metal in the upper control arms.

 

Checkout these upper control arms from http://opentrackerracing.com. They completely rebuild the shafts and weld a tab to keep the bushings from moving. I have a set on my 1973 Coupe along with the roller perches.

 

http://opentrackerracing.com/product/street-performance-upper-control-arms-1967-1973-mustang/

 

judge, thanks for the correct position of the o-rings!!

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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Guest Pastel Blue

I am not sure how they will come apart if they are properly torqued down? I know in my case, the arms themselves are in perfect shape, no worries about fatigue. The shaft arm bushings, once centred are torqued to spec (25-35), greased properly etc. Obviously, the install to the shock towers to spec as well. maybe the units you bought were prone to failure regardless of a proper install or not.

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Pastel Blue,

 

I think maybe I did not use a torque wrench on them at the time I installed them!. Anyway, keep us posted on your progress!

 

Thanks

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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Make a note to check the end caps after a period of time. I rebuild mine back in the mid-90's since the car was low mileage and aside from surface rust, everything (aside from dried out seals and bushings) was in good shape. Fast forward to 10 years or so while I was changing out the front coils and found movement in the upper arm. Turns out (pun intended) the end caps had worked their way out and were only holding on by a few threads.

 

Since then I've learned quite a few folks tack weld the cap to hold it in place once they complete the rebuild. I would also recommend using a chisel to line mark the location of the cap on the shaft threads as well as painting a thin line of paint to easily observe changes. These days I always use a fine brush and mark essential cap and bolt locations so I can easily check for anything that has changed while doing periodical inspections.

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Guest Pastel Blue

Good advice! I did mark them for future reference. the car will not be driven extensively, but I also like to keep an eye on my mechanicals over time. I am hesitant to tack weld in case changes have to be made. It does come down to good maintenance and keeping an eye one the 'ole girl...

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  • 5 weeks later...

This thread is handy since I am at the point where I need to decide if I want to either replace the bushing kit or the whole arm. So I have couple questions:

-When I look at bushing kits they have them for OEM arms and for replacement arms. Then, how do I know if I have the OEM arms? I guess I need to get under there and try to find a Ford part.

-If I decide to replace them, the price range for this things is huge. The Scott Drake and Dynacorns are in the $50-$70 range while the other more "sophisticated" brands are in the $200+ range.

 

As you can see, I don't know what to do. If I keep the old ones I would like to replace the bushings and the ball joint.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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This thread is handy since I am at the point where I need to decide if I want to either replace the bushing kit or the whole arm. So I have couple questions:

-When I look at bushing kits they have them for OEM arms and for replacement arms. Then, how do I know if I have the OEM arms? I guess I need to get under there and try to find a Ford part.

-If I decide to replace them, the price range for this things is huge. The Scott Drake and Dynacorns are in the $50-$70 range while the other more "sophisticated" brands are in the $200+ range.

 

As you can see, I don't know what to do. If I keep the old ones I would like to replace the bushings and the ball joint.

 

Throwing in my 2 cents worth again! I just recently did my entire front suspension. My original thought was to rebuild my original upper arms. As my 71 Mach 1 was pretty much untouched when I got it, it was fairly safe to assume they were the original factory parts. I was unable to find Ford numbers anywhere, but they could have been easily missed even after a good scrubbing. To me, these are just replacement parts. The lowers certainly are as the lower ball joint is not replaceable, or at least I was not able to locate any replacement lower ball joints, so I figure they are just sold as a complete replacement item. Reproductions are cheap, good and far less hassle so why bother if they don't count in the "Numbers Matching" scheme of things. I suppose the purist concours type might think it worth the time and added expense, but for a weekend driver, not so much.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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I am not concerned about numbers matching. I just don't want to buy replacement parts that will break a year down the road. In my case I am leaning towards complete replacement since I am already doing that for most suspension/steering/brake components.

 

I am reading about the Scott Drakes and Dynacorn with mix reviews. Are these reliable and as strong as the OEM?

 

What about the Open Track Racing ones suggested here? anyone else using these? The OTR's are a little more, but not that expensive. Are they worth it?

 

This thread is handy since I am at the point where I need to decide if I want to either replace the bushing kit or the whole arm. So I have couple questions:

-When I look at bushing kits they have them for OEM arms and for replacement arms. Then, how do I know if I have the OEM arms? I guess I need to get under there and try to find a Ford part.

-If I decide to replace them, the price range for this things is huge. The Scott Drake and Dynacorns are in the $50-$70 range while the other more "sophisticated" brands are in the $200+ range.

 

As you can see, I don't know what to do. If I keep the old ones I would like to replace the bushings and the ball joint.

 

Throwing in my 2 cents worth again! I just recently did my entire front suspension. My original thought was to rebuild my original upper arms. As my 71 Mach 1 was pretty much untouched when I got it, it was fairly safe to assume they were the original factory parts. I was unable to find Ford numbers anywhere, but they could have been easily missed even after a good scrubbing. To me, these are just replacement parts. The lowers certainly are as the lower ball joint is not replaceable, or at least I was not able to locate any replacement lower ball joints, so I figure they are just sold as a complete replacement item. Reproductions are cheap, good and far less hassle so why bother if they don't count in the "Numbers Matching" scheme of things. I suppose the purist concours type might think it worth the time and added expense, but for a weekend driver, not so much.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Guest Pastel Blue

This thread is handy since I am at the point where I need to decide if I want to either replace the bushing kit or the whole arm. So I have couple questions:

-When I look at bushing kits they have them for OEM arms and for replacement arms. Then, how do I know if I have the OEM arms? I guess I need to get under there and try to find a Ford part.

-If I decide to replace them, the price range for this things is huge. The Scott Drake and Dynacorns are in the $50-$70 range while the other more "sophisticated" brands are in the $200+ range.

 

As you can see, I don't know what to do. If I keep the old ones I would like to replace the bushings and the ball joint.

 

Throwing in my 2 cents worth again! I just recently did my entire front suspension. My original thought was to rebuild my original upper arms. As my 71 Mach 1 was pretty much untouched when I got it, it was fairly safe to assume they were the original factory parts. I was unable to find Ford numbers anywhere, but they could have been easily missed even after a good scrubbing. To me, these are just replacement parts. The lowers certainly are as the lower ball joint is not replaceable, or at least I was not able to locate any replacement lower ball joints, so I figure they are just sold as a complete replacement item. Reproductions are cheap, good and far less hassle so why bother if they don't count in the "Numbers Matching" scheme of things. I suppose the purist concours type might think it worth the time and added expense, but for a weekend driver, not so much.

 

I reused my control arms as original is important to me where I can maintain them as such. It is much easier just to buy a replacement control arm, upper or lower if you are not concerned with originality. You can replace the ball joints on lower control arms, but they are difficult to locate. there is a lot of work with the upper control arms if you are going to reuse them.

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This thread is handy since I am at the point where I need to decide if I want to either replace the bushing kit or the whole arm. So I have couple questions:

-When I look at bushing kits they have them for OEM arms and for replacement arms. Then, how do I know if I have the OEM arms? I guess I need to get under there and try to find a Ford part.

-If I decide to replace them, the price range for this things is huge. The Scott Drake and Dynacorns are in the $50-$70 range while the other more "sophisticated" brands are in the $200+ range.

 

As you can see, I don't know what to do. If I keep the old ones I would like to replace the bushings and the ball joint.

 

Throwing in my 2 cents worth again! I just recently did my entire front suspension. My original thought was to rebuild my original upper arms. As my 71 Mach 1 was pretty much untouched when I got it, it was fairly safe to assume they were the original factory parts. I was unable to find Ford numbers anywhere, but they could have been easily missed even after a good scrubbing. To me, these are just replacement parts. The lowers certainly are as the lower ball joint is not replaceable, or at least I was not able to locate any replacement lower ball joints, so I figure they are just sold as a complete replacement item. Reproductions are cheap, good and far less hassle so why bother if they don't count in the "Numbers Matching" scheme of things. I suppose the purist concours type might think it worth the time and added expense, but for a weekend driver, not so much.

 

I reused my control arms as original is important to me where I can maintain them as such. It is much easier just to buy a replacement control arm, upper or lower if you are not concerned with originality. You can replace the ball joints on lower control arms, but they are difficult to locate. there is a lot of work with the upper control arms if you are going to reuse them.

 

Well now, I guess time will tell if the Scott Drake ones I used are as good as original. They certainly look the part, same gauge steel and no problem fitting them. Yes I am concerned with quality and should a person wish to rebuild the originals, more power to him. It's a choice after all and we have to make decisions based on information presented.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Guest Pastel Blue

Not sure where you are going with this? Apples and oranges here, original vs aftermarket and yes, to each his own. If someone is doing a concourse restoration like I am, then they will look to reuse original parts where possible, hence, rebuilding my original control arms. For daily drivers, Some of the aftermarket stuff is good, do your research and make the best decision for your situation.

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Not sure where you are going with this? Apples and oranges here, original vs aftermarket and yes, to each his own. If someone is doing a concourse restoration like I am, then they will look to reuse original parts where possible, hence, rebuilding my original control arms. For daily drivers, Some of the aftermarket stuff is good, do your research and make the best decision for your situation.

 

I guess I must have missed that you are doing a concourse restoration. In that case I would agree, repair and use as much as possible even if it just for your satisfaction knowing it is still all original.

In my case, although my car is still mostly original in so much as it is a numbers car, I needed upgrade much of it for safety and drivability. Beside I don't have the cash to go that route. Concourse gets expensive. Good luck with it, I'm sure it will be awesome when done.

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Since I may be going the complete replacement route I would have a pair of Moog ball joints available for sale if anyone is interested.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MOG-K8142

 

Also, another question, does anyone knows what is the deal with these UCAs that have a dual tone paint on them?

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Guest Pastel Blue

Not sure where you are going with this? Apples and oranges here, original vs aftermarket and yes, to each his own. If someone is doing a concourse restoration like I am, then they will look to reuse original parts where possible, hence, rebuilding my original control arms. For daily drivers, Some of the aftermarket stuff is good, do your research and make the best decision for your situation.

 

I guess I must have missed that you are doing a concourse restoration. In that case I would agree, repair and use as much as possible even if it just for your satisfaction knowing it is still all original.

In my case, although my car is still mostly original in so much as it is a numbers car, I needed upgrade much of it for safety and drivability. Beside I don't have the cash to go that route. UConcourse gets expensive. Good luck with it, I'm sure it will be awesome when done.

Geoff.

 

Living in Ontario, you know the costs to work on these cars. I would be somewhat embarrassed to advertise the money I am investing in my restoration... Getting killed on the dollar exchange to boot. This restoration is the culmination of a 35+ year passion and my goal to finish this car to be as close to factory as possible. Just something I feel I have to do... Good luck with your car, sounds like you have a really good base to work with. Cheers

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Since I may be going the complete replacement route I would have a pair of Moog ball joints available for sale if anyone is interested.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MOG-K8142

 

Also, another question, does anyone knows what is the deal with these UCAs that have a dual tone paint on them?

 

I too have a set of Moog upper ball joints that were near new when I put in the new UCA's. I'll keep mine just in case!!

As for the paint being only on part of the UCA and lowers as well, my best guess based on my former experience, the parts were 'dip' painted, not sprayed. The parts would be hung on a line traveling through a vat of paint. I don't think "E" coating was around in the very early 70's, but I could be wrong. The plant I worked at were we built the vast majority of Chrysler air cleaners, didn't install an E-coat (electro-coat) line until about 1983 when we started building the 'K' car air cleaner by the thousands.

I would stand corrected if someone else knows for sure why only the back 2/3rds were painted.

Geoff.


Not sure where you are going with this? Apples and oranges here, original vs aftermarket and yes, to each his own. If someone is doing a concourse restoration like I am, then they will look to reuse original parts where possible, hence, rebuilding my original control arms. For daily drivers, Some of the aftermarket stuff is good, do your research and make the best decision for your situation.

 

I guess I must have missed that you are doing a concourse restoration. In that case I would agree, repair and use as much as possible even if it just for your satisfaction knowing it is still all original.

In my case, although my car is still mostly original in so much as it is a numbers car, I needed upgrade much of it for safety and drivability. Beside I don't have the cash to go that route. UConcourse gets expensive. Good luck with it, I'm sure it will be awesome when done.

Geoff.

 

Living in Ontario, you know the costs to work on these cars. I would be somewhat embarrassed to advertise the money I am investing in my restoration... Getting killed on the dollar exchange to boot. This restoration is the culmination of a 35+ year passion and my goal to finish this car to be as close to factory as possible. Just something I feel I have to do... Good luck with your car, sounds like you have a really good base to work with. Cheers

 

Living in Ontario, I sure do know the high cost of working on these cars and yes, the exchange rate is killing us. I have put on hold getting my Hurst Comp Plus shifter rebuilt at Hurst as I would be looking at about 500 bucks when all said and done. This is a case where the aftermarket so-called Comp Plus is no where near the same animal and NOT for my car.

I wish I'd known back in 1980 what little bit I know now. I bought a very clean, rust free 1972 Q code 351CJ. I sold it in 1991 when we bought a new house and I knew the car was going to sit for several more years. I still regret selling that car and yes I definitely would have done a concours resto, it would have been worth it. I say this because I get where you are coming from now you've explained your plans and journey. You'll have to post pictures later. I think we all would love to see them.

Geoff.

PS are you a member of the GHMA? I was, not now.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Guest Pastel Blue

Since I may be going the complete replacement route I would have a pair of Moog ball joints available for sale if anyone is interested.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MOG-K8142

 

Also, another question, does anyone knows what is the deal with these UCAs that have a dual tone paint on them?

 

I too have a set of Moog upper ball joints that were near new when I put in the new UCA's. I'll keep mine just in case!!

As for the paint being only on part of the UCA and lowers as well, my best guess based on my former experience, the parts were 'dip' painted, not sprayed. The parts would be hung on a line traveling through a vat of paint. I don't think "E" coating was around in the very early 70's, but I could be wrong. The plant I worked at were we built the vast majority of Chrysler air cleaners, didn't install an E-coat (electro-coat) line until about 1983 when we started building the 'K' car air cleaner by the thousands.

I would stand corrected if someone else knows for sure why only the back 2/3rds were painted.

Geoff.


 

I guess I must have missed that you are doing a concourse restoration. In that case I would agree, repair and use as much as possible even if it just for your satisfaction knowing it is still all original.

In my case, although my car is still mostly original in so much as it is a numbers car, I needed upgrade much of it for safety and drivability. Beside I don't have the cash to go that route. UConcourse gets expensive. Good luck with it, I'm sure it will be awesome when done.

Geoff.

 

Living in Ontario, you know the costs to work on these cars. I would be somewhat embarrassed to advertise the money I am investing in my restoration... Getting killed on the dollar exchange to boot. This restoration is the culmination of a 35+ year passion and my goal to finish this car to be as close to factory as possible. Just something I feel I have to do... Good luck with your car, sounds like you have a really good base to work with. Cheers

 

Living in Ontario, I sure do know the high cost of working on these cars and yes, the exchange rate is killing us. I have put on hold getting my Hurst Comp Plus shifter rebuilt at Hurst as I would be looking at about 500 bucks when all said and done. This is a case where the aftermarket so-called Comp Plus is no where near the same animal and NOT for my car.

I wish I'd known back in 1980 what little bit I know now. I bought a very clean, rust free 1972 Q code 351CJ. I sold it in 1991 when we bought a new house and I knew the car was going to sit for several more years. I still regret selling that car and yes I definitely would have done a concours resto, it would have been worth it. I say this because I get where you are coming from now you've explained your plans and journey. You'll have to post pictures later. I think we all would love to see them.

Geoff.

PS are you a member of the GHMA? I was, not now.

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Just to save space, I started a separate post. The car is going to be awesome when done and I see why you are known as "Pastel Blue"

We're getting a bit, well a lot, of track. I left GHMA for similar reasons, but in 08 when I joined, I needed some help, which I got. Now I found 7173"s forum, I love it here, lots of great help, suggestions and support. Getting corrected on some issues is also well received. Making mistakes is how we learn.

PM me if you wish,

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Guest Pastel Blue

Since I may be going the complete replacement route I would have a pair of Moog ball joints available for sale if anyone is interested.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MOG-K8142

 

Also, another question, does anyone knows what is the deal with these UCAs that have a dual tone paint on them?

 

Possibly opening up a can of worms here..., I don't believe that the upper control arms were dual painted, they were bare steel look on the '71's. The lower control arms were (may have been) dipped about 2/3 to 3/4 of the length in some form of black paint but staying away from the ball joint end of the arm. You will get many opinions on issues such as this, but my research and in reviewing my original control arms, this is what I could determine for my car.

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I was talking about the aftermarket UCAs. Scott Drake has a version with a without the dual tone.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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