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Hello tony-muscle,

 

Yes, The distances for the return fuel line is much shorter since I can mount it near the tank. Also, Yes, I aware of built-in pressure regulator and had planned on using that feature. A colleague of mine has the FiTech 400 and FiTech 800 fitted the same way and it works really well. Early this morning, I had placed an order for the 71-73 tank to pump fuel line to run parallel with my existing line. After speaking with him about the LS1 system, thise seemed a better way to do it.

 

Thanks for asking.

 

mustang7173

 

All,

 

My head is about to explode with this project. So, I canceled the fuel line route and went with the GM LS Engine Fuel filter/combo pressure regulator. I only bought the fuel/regulator and some of the required fittings to complete the process.

 

Can I ask why are you using an external regulator? The FiTech unit has its own internal regulator so you don't need an external one.

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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Hey Guys....I need help regarding an issue I have relative to my need for a good 12 volt keyed source when the key is on and in crank mode....I also have the FITECH EFI unit. Someone told me that the yellow wire off of the ignition switch is hot with 12 volts when in key on and crank mode...can anyone verify this please....I personally wondered if the " I " post on the fender solenoid isn't a good source of 12 volts like I need.....i would appreciate your help.....thank you

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I am not using a FiTech unit however my system had the same requirement. My fuse block has a threaded stud in the center that has 12 v in the run and start position. I connected my system there and it works just fine. Not sure if all car years have this feature though.

-john

(jbojo)

351C 4V cc heads, 10.5 : 1 CR, 290 Herbert cam, Flat top forged pistons, forged connecting rods, Atomic efi,

C6 with Gear Vendor overdrive, 3.89 Tru Trac, Hooker Super Comp with 2 1/2" Pypes Exhaust.        

 

Some Mod pictures can be seen at: [button=http://www.7173mustangs.com/forum-garage?filterxt_uid=2026]Bojo's Garage[/button]

 

 

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The yellow wire is the main power feed from the hot side of the solenoid to the ignition switch and is hot all the time. What you want is the red with light green stripe wire, where it comes off the switch. The red/light green wire that connects to the coil is after it runs through the pink resistor wire and has reduced voltage.

 

If your car originally had a throttle solenoid positioner it would be a good source for the key on voltage to turn the FiTech on. It is a red wire with yellow hash marks, and should end about where the carburetor is or was. This wire runs though a 14 amp fuse, so it should be plenty for the turn-on wire.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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The yellow wire is the main power feed from the hot side of the solenoid to the ignition switch and is hot all the time. What you want is the red with light green stripe wire, where it comes off the switch. The red/light green wire that connects to the coil is after it runs through the pink resistor wire and has reduced voltage.

 

If your car originally had a throttle solenoid positioner it would be a good source for the key on voltage to turn the FiTech on. It is a red wire with yellow hash marks, and should end about where the carburetor is or was. This wire runs though a 14 amp fuse, so it should be plenty for the turn-on wire.

Ding Ding Ding! That is correct.:goodpost::bravo:

Let me check your shorts!

http://midlifeharness.com

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The yellow wire is the main power feed from the hot side of the solenoid to the ignition switch and is hot all the time. What you want is the red with light green stripe wire, where it comes off the switch. The red/light green wire that connects to the coil is after it runs through the pink resistor wire and has reduced voltage.

 

If your car originally had a throttle solenoid positioner it would be a good source for the key on voltage to turn the FiTech on. It is a red wire with yellow hash marks, and should end about where the carburetor is or was. This wire runs though a 14 amp fuse, so it should be plenty for the turn-on wire.

What about the choke wire? Would that work?

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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What about the choke wire? Would that work?

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

 

The stock choke wire came from the stator terminal on the alternator and is lower voltage.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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All,

 

Time to break out the 1973 wiring diagram!

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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What about the choke wire? Would that work?

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

 

The stock choke wire came from the stator terminal on the alternator and is lower voltage.

 

I don't think the 71 had a choke wire. I tapped off the carb solenoid for my electric choke.

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What about the choke wire? Would that work?

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

 

The stock choke wire came from the stator terminal on the alternator and is lower voltage.

 

I don't think the 71 had a choke wire. I tapped off the carb solenoid for my electric choke.

Interesting. Mine has one, but could have been added by someone in the past. Now I am curious.

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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All,

 

Started working on the Tanks Inc. PA-4 fuel pump install in my new Tanks Inc. fuel tank. Several items of interest while installing. I got the tools mentioned by AutoEdit’s video, the 3 and 4 inch hole saws. We used the 3 inch one first to cut a 3 inch alignment plate to install into the evaporate opening. We noticed a bit of movement of the plate, when trying to lock it down. We had to align the hole, we locked it down with the ring. Cut the 4 inch hole. Next, we laid the mounting ring to trace the mounting holes. I noticed that the cut out opening was not as big as the I.D. of the mounting ring. OK, well, then. So, I drilled the holes to the size per the instructions. Slipped the ring inside and inserted the screws. Here is where I again noticed the cut out hole was little smaller that the I.D. of the mounting bracket. Well, the lip over hang to the mounting ring was further in than what I saw on the video.

 

Our fix to this little issue was to use a spot weld cutter in 4 corners of the ring circumference area. Since the tanks metal thickness is thin, it did not take much cutting to open up a weld hole. We tacked 4 holes, ground it smooth. When it was time to insert the fuel pump bracket, we had a bit of clearance problems. We rectified that issue with rounding out the edges of the main bracket to the sump tray. Slid right in.

 

After all is said and done, I went back to the instructions and found that it says “ Tack weld the ring on the inside of the 4 ½ inch opening. “ Wait a minute, According to AutoEdit’s video, he used a 4 inch hole saw.

 

My suggestion on this project, would be to look at a 4 1/8 hole saw. I believe the 4 ½ may not provide much material around the mounting holes. On the evaporate hole plate, I would look at the 3 1/8 hole saw. I would recommend to measure sure to make sure, though.

Next, the hardware that comes with the kit is all zinc plated. IMO, zinc plated hardware does not stand up to the weather very well. I am looking into #10 stainless steel hardware for all mounting points.

 

dn2etk.jpg

 

Keep you posted.

 

Mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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  • 2 weeks later...

All,

 

Started working on the Tanks Inc. PA-4 fuel pump install in my new Tanks Inc. fuel tank. Several items of interest while installing. I got the tools mentioned by AutoEdit’s video, the 3 and 4 inch hole saws. We used the 3 inch one first to cut a 3 inch alignment plate to install into the evaporate opening. We noticed a bit of movement of the plate, when trying to lock it down. We had to align the hole, we locked it down with the ring. Cut the 4 inch hole. Next, we laid the mounting ring to trace the mounting holes. I noticed that the cut out opening was not as big as the I.D. of the mounting ring. OK, well, then. So, I drilled the holes to the size per the instructions. Slipped the ring inside and inserted the screws. Here is where I again noticed the cut out hole was little smaller that the I.D. of the mounting bracket. Well, the lip over hang to the mounting ring was further in than what I saw on the video.

 

Our fix to this little issue was to use a spot weld cutter in 4 corners of the ring circumference area. Since the tanks metal thickness is thin, it did not take much cutting to open up a weld hole. We tacked 4 holes, ground it smooth. When it was time to insert the fuel pump bracket, we had a bit of clearance problems. We rectified that issue with rounding out the edges of the main bracket to the sump tray. Slid right in.

 

After all is said and done, I went back to the instructions and found that it says “ Tack weld the ring on the inside of the 4 ½ inch opening. “ Wait a minute, According to AutoEdit’s video, he used a 4 inch hole saw.

 

My suggestion on this project, would be to look at a 4 1/8 hole saw. I believe the 4 ½ may not provide much material around the mounting holes. On the evaporate hole plate, I would look at the 3 1/8 hole saw. I would recommend to measure sure to make sure, though.

Next, the hardware that comes with the kit is all zinc plated. IMO, zinc plated hardware does not stand up to the weather very well. I am looking into #10 stainless steel hardware for all mounting points.

 

dn2etk.jpg

 

Keep you posted.

 

Mustang7173

 

Will the Fitech fit under the RAM-Air cleaner and RAM-Air plenum??

 

BDK

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It should, assuming the manifold isn't too tall. The FiTech throttle body is the same height (3.25") as Holley carburetors. Because it is shaped differently than carburetors the air cleaner base may need to be modified, though. You can get an idea of how it might, or might not, fit by looking at the dimensions. You'll need to download the pdf to see the elevation (side) view.

http://fitechefi.com/tech-posts/fitech-throttle-body-dimensions/

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Fitech First Start Coming Tomorrow!

Well guys it looks like tomorrow should give me a chance to attempt the first start of the Go Street 400 Fitech system I'm converting to from the Holley Projection 670cfm system I installed back in 1994.....I had decided to convert to the newer self learning system, albeit after much consideration since the days of fighting with the Holley system that seemingly always had me chasing the right fuel curve for across the board performance at times...at some point I dialed it in pretty close and the overall performance was good.instant starts every time and reliable for 23 years..yet the Holley system ( 670cfm 2Di unit) wasn't designed to support more than 275 horsepower, per Holley, but I just felt that there was a great deal of performance left on the so called " table" with that unit and so the decision was made to give Fitech EFI a try....cost vs the competitors, ease of installation and the ability to support horsepower closer to my output and its self learning feature made the decision a bit easier I imagine. But as an older tuner, and one who loves what the 351 Cleveland can do, it still wasn't an easy decision simply because I have wondered this week as I near completion of the install....."if I was happy with what I had, I hope the transition to something better is exactly that"....my daughter recently asked " poppa if it's running the way you want, why then do you always mess with it?", I knew she was right to a degree and maybe trying to find optimum tuning windows has caused me to do exactly that.....not knowing when to be satisfied...I'll share what happens with the start up with you guys when I give it a try.....

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For anyone considering the EFI move, please please be sure that you have a solid electrical ground scheme in your cars......at a minimum engine to the block, block to the chassis, chassis to the firewall is what I had to do when the old Holley failed to start once ending up sitting in my garage for 5 months going from running darn good to nothing but cranking and dumping lots of fuel!.......UNTIL.....one morning I sat reading a Ford MotorSports Magazine when I ran across an article entitled " Get Grounded For EFI".....I read it simply because I had run out of ideas trying to solve my mysterious problem and sure enough when I ventured out to the garage to determine whether or not my grounding scheme under the hood was satisfactory, I found out that while I'd upgraded "stuff" to an old school car, I hadn't given grounding any consideration.....I configured my negative grounding network as the article stated an BINGO!!! engine started and ran perfectly....I imagine that the basic setup of battery to the block had run its course so please be sure to verify that your setup is grounded for success!

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I would also suggest upgrading your battery cables. This is for everyone really, especially anyone running a high compression engine. Get yourself a really good AGM battery, 750cc amps. Then get solder on battery terminals and use #1 or #2 AWG Battery cable. Some people use Welding cable, I do not like it. The Jacket of welding cable is very flimsy. It is designed to be easily rolled up and flipped around long runs of cable so the welders can move around easily. This is fine for welding, but in a car, you want a heavy jacket to protect it. Thats why I find a wholesale electrical supply house, and get their best grade of Automotive battery cable. The jacket on that type is very stuff, very abrasion proof, and is over twice the thickness of welding cable. The #1 or #2 Cable will handle alot more amps that the stock cables, but more importantly, the grounding potential of the negative power cable is multiple times better than the stock cables.

 

Plus if you run a Big Stereo or any power hog like that, the extra large cable comes in handy for sending power to amps. I like the solder on connections because they are more protected than regular wire. The Hydrogen that is expelled by conventional batteries will corrode the cable thru the smallest of cracks in the jacket or exposed wire. That is why I also use the heavy duty heat shrink with glue inside so that all the connections are sealed gas tight so they will not corrode.

 

The Flag Style terminal here is good if your sending power to a distribution box for power amps.

20140509_135804_1.jpg

 

On the ends that connect to the starter solenoid or directly to the starter motor, you use the straight solder on terminals like this.

20140509_140236.jpg

20140509_135756.jpg

 

Also one very worthwhile upgrade to the older mustangs (if your not trying to keep it bone stock) is to upgrade the starter/alternator/starter relay system to a later 3G style. The PMGR Starter, and a mid 90's style starter relay, and a mind 90's style 3G alternator will produce well over twice the current of the stock 1G alternator setup. With a high compression engine, the larger cables and PMGR starter will provide more starting power to the engine.

 

 

I really like the FI Tech EFI system. For a budget system, it seems to work really good. I have at least 3 friends that run the system and it was a big overall improvement in performance, especially in places that require seasonal carb adjustments. These systems arent as good as some of the ones that are over twice as expensive, but they are a great value solution that works much better than a carb. The weakness of the FI Tech unit is all in the fuel pump system. Its funky. The first guy I know that got one had nothing but trouble with it. The other 2 guys both had issues getting FI Tech to send them the fuel pump unit, but it eventually showed up. They said the issues seem to be worked out, but it was still a bit tricky to install, but is doable.

"I drank what?" - Socrates

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Fired on the first crank!

Well today I finally gave the Fitech its first try and sure enough it fired on the very first crank.....just need to get a better understanding of the tuning procedure of the handheld, tune the IAC idle steps and a couple of other variables and take her for a ride....but atleast the hard part is over....easy install and the system seems to be much more powerful than my old Projection Unit...well keep you guys posted as I get further into this transition...

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  • 2 weeks later...

All,

 

The weather finally synced up this Saturday, nice balmy 74 degrees! Got the new Tank Inc PA-4 in the tank fuel pump mounted,plumbed and mounted.

 

https://ibb.co/cuicQa

Tank_1.jpg

 

Post more pictures Sunday!

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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All,

 

Got the LS1 fuel/pressure regulated filter mounted and plumbed. Also ran the power/ground through existing electric fuel pump mounting via rubber grommet. I purchased the grommet and 2, 9/16 hole plugs, Lowe's Home Improvement,  to finish out the dressing. Next week, I will be working on the plumbing of the Oxygen sensor.

 

EFI_0.jpg

EFI_1.jpg

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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All,

 

The next to last thing to d underneath, is to plug up the fuel tank sending unit. While watch AutoEdit's video, I noticed he had a bolt in the tube that held the sock filter. Unfortunately, he not go into specifics on how he processed that area. I purchased a Stainless Steel 5/16 hex bolt with a shoulder.

 

Any suggestions on what to use to seal the bolt in? It needs to be fuel resistance.

 

 

Sending_Unit_0.jpg

photo upload

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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Permatex #1 should seal it. However, if it were me, I would pinch and solder the sock end, cut the outlet end between the elbow and flange, pinch and solder it. Using silver solder will allow soldering it at a low enough temperature that it won't burn off the zinc coating and never have to worry about it.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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All,

 

I went with Don C's suggestion. I got some acid core solder, flattened the ends and solder them up.

 

Sending_Unit_0.jpg

 

Sending_Unit_1.jpg

 

http upload image

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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