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I've been thinking (maybe over-thinking), have any of you thought about installing an inertia switch in the fuel pump circuit? One of the nice things about fuel injection is that the engine doesn't flood out during hard braking and acceleration or during abrupt manuevers like a carburetor can cause. The downside is that it also will run upside down or on its side. The FiTech has a feature that will shut off the voltage to the fuel pump if the RPMs get too low, but in the case of a crash and the engine keeps running the electric fuel pump will keep running. This is why all Ford factory FI systems include an inertia switch. Other manufacturers use other safety features like a low oil pressure switch.

 

Don

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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When I built my 69 vert restomod (EFI 302ci) I installed a Ford inertia switch in the trunk next to the filler tube. It's wired in-line with the fuel pump motor.

 

Obviously with 71-73 factory fuel pump that is operated by the crankshaft, it would not do much for fuel delivery, but you could wire it to cut out the ignition circuit.

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Good Day to All,

 

Here is the latest- I went to Northern Tool and picked up a right angle drill head. They also have the 2 step drill bits. The instructions call for a 7/8 inch hole. I went with the next to the 7/8 inch hole, slightly smaller hole. Works just fine.

 

I have the Lokar carburetor adapter plate for the AOD TV Cable. I had to drill a small hole to clear the butterfly stud. After I drilled, I clear coated to prevent rust.

 

 

Carb_1.jpg

 

Carb_2.jpg

 

Carb_0.jpg

 

my photos upload

 

I wil post more updates later on.

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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  • 2 weeks later...

All,

 

I installed a Ford inertia switch in the trunk also when I installed the electric fuel for my carburetor. I am almost finish wiring up the FiTech EFI 400. I am using the Painless 1/2 ClassicBraid Wire wrap

 

http://www.painlessperformance.com/webcat/70958

 

70958.jpg

 

1/4 Tube

 

http://www.macsautoparts.com/store/wiring-loom-1-4-id-cloth.html

 

1_4_Loom.jpg

 

 

5/16 Tube

http://www.macsautoparts.com/store/wire-loom-5-16-id-black-flexible-cloth-sold-by-the-foot.html

 

5_16_Loom.jpg

 

Here is some of the wire covering I used to dress out the harnesses!

 

mustang7173

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mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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  • 3 weeks later...

All,

 

An Update. I have removed this bracket that was originally for the Holley Carb. The pivot point did not pull the Lokar TV cable in the proper geometry. Once I removed the bracket, added the studs directly to the FiTech, the Lokar geometer was back in alignment.

 

 

Carb_0.jpg

 

image storage server

 

Thanks

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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All,

 

Another update here! A friend of mine who has 2 of the FiTech 600 Hp's EFI's found this on the FaceBook FiTech Technical Support group.

 

Fitech just posted this to the fitech facebook group. I still have not figured out how this affects us, but you need to read it....

 

Here is the be all end all on fuel pressure. Please read fully before Commenting.

IGNORE all previous instruction besides what is below. Our new instructions will have the below in them.

Go Street, Mean Street = 43 PSI

(if you are using an FCC simply change your EFI regulator over to the FCC and vise versa, for all external regulators set them to 43PSI) Go EFI 4 600, 600 PA, 1200PA, Dual Quad 625HP, Dual quad 1200PA = 58PSI If you have a FCC, Inline pump kit, aftermarket inline kit, aftermarket in tank pump kit, aftermarket return style regulator, aftermarket filter regulator (corvette filter regulator), or any other combination of the ones above, then you can use them with our system so long as they are set to the respective pressures for that unit.

Vacuum line routing:

The regulator vacuum line MUST be connected to MANIFOLD vacuum (rear passenger side 3/16 vacuum port), this is true for ALL regulators we offer. Be that on single Throttle Body, Dual Quad (both regulators if using both return ports, single regulator if your only using one TB for return), or FCC. You can "T" into this line if you need manifold vacuum for other accessories. For boosted applications you must route the regulator to a boost reference. For blow thru applications it would go to the same rear passenger 3/16 vacuum port on the TB, for draw thru applications (roots style supercharged, draw through turbo) we must route the vacuum reference to below the supercharger or in the intake in some fashion to get both vacuum and boost reference from this location for proper pressure compensation.The regulators need vacuum to help lower the fuel pressure at idle or increase fuel pressure under boost which helps fuel trim needs of the system to properly control fuel and AFR Fuel pump restrictions:

340LPH or lower LPH can be used directly with our system with our regulators. If you are using a larger pump (anything larger than 340LPH such as an Aeromotive A1000 for example) than you must use and external regulator system with its own return (making sure to block our return with the supplied plug) and set the regulator to to respective pressure for that unit.

Over pressure:

If you are using a fuel system with a Mean street, or the Go Street and cannot regulate down to 43PSI, the system will compensate but it may make your trim and learn percentage pull out fuel and this could affect your overall fueling and could be slightly rich at idle. It wont damage anything but it wont be optimal for fuel consumption.

To swap regulators follow these instructions:

Release fuel pressure by cracking the feed line loose that goes to the throttle body, it will leak fuel and release pressure. Retighten line once this is done. Next remove two Allen screws securing regulator hold down to the passenger-side (non-linkage side), remove hold down and pull regulator out, you may need to rotate the regulator back and forth as you pull to get it out easier. Repeat this process on the FCC regulator. With both regulators out grease both the large upper o-rings and the small lower o-rings with lithium based grease. With that done slowly slide each regulator into its respective port, they will slide in smoothly with little effort DO NOT force them in as this will damage the o-rings. then install hold down and Allen screws and snug them down. you have now switched regulators.

If you need any further info you can look at our tech forum/tech article section of fitechefi.com

 

One part that grabbed our attention is this: Go Street, Mean Street = 43 PSI

 

So, I called FiTech Support and stated that I had the LS1 fuel regulator/fuel that was set to 58 PSI. The LS1 has a built return and this is how I have my return line setup. Could this my problem with the idle going from 800 RPM's to 1200 RPM's every other minute? Support stated that the 58 PSI could be causing this issue. Now, since FiTech has stated the reduced the fuel PSI, I will need to re-configure my return line to take advantage of the built pressure regulator.

 

I did some research on the FiTech EFi systems, and almost all pictures that saw, they had the return fuel plumed.

 

This weekend will be the return fuel line re-configuration fun.

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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All,

 

Another update here! A friend of mine who has 2 of the FiTech 600 Hp's EFI's found this on the FaceBook FiTech Technical Support group.

 

Fitech just posted this to the fitech facebook group.  I still have not figured out how this affects us, but you need to read it....

 

Here is the be all end all on fuel pressure. Please read fully before Commenting.

IGNORE all previous instruction besides what is below. Our new instructions will have the below in them.

Go Street, Mean Street = 43 PSI

(if you are using an FCC simply change your EFI regulator over to the FCC and vise versa, for all external regulators set them to 43PSI) Go EFI 4 600, 600 PA, 1200PA, Dual Quad 625HP, Dual quad 1200PA = 58PSI If you have a FCC, Inline pump kit, aftermarket inline kit, aftermarket in tank pump kit, aftermarket return style regulator, aftermarket filter regulator (corvette filter regulator), or any other combination of the ones above, then you can use them with our system so long as they are set to the respective pressures for that unit.

Vacuum line routing:

The regulator vacuum line MUST be connected to MANIFOLD vacuum (rear passenger side 3/16 vacuum port), this is true for ALL regulators we offer. Be that on single Throttle Body, Dual Quad (both regulators if using both return ports, single regulator if your only using one TB for return), or FCC. You can "T" into this line if you need manifold vacuum for other accessories. For boosted applications you must route the regulator to a boost reference. For blow thru applications it would go to the same rear passenger 3/16 vacuum port on the TB, for draw thru applications (roots style supercharged, draw through turbo) we must route the vacuum reference to below the supercharger or in the intake in some fashion to get both vacuum and boost reference from this location for proper pressure compensation.The regulators need vacuum to help lower the fuel pressure at idle or increase fuel pressure under boost which helps fuel trim needs of the system to properly control fuel and AFR Fuel pump restrictions:

340LPH or lower LPH can be used directly with our system with our regulators. If you are using a larger pump (anything larger than 340LPH such as an Aeromotive A1000 for example) than you must use and external regulator system with its own return (making sure to block our return with the supplied plug) and set the regulator to to respective pressure for that unit.

Over pressure:

If you are using a fuel system with a Mean street, or the Go Street and cannot regulate down to 43PSI, the system will compensate but it may make your trim and learn percentage pull out fuel and this could affect your overall fueling and could be slightly rich at idle. It won't damage anything but it won't be optimal for fuel consumption.

To swap regulators follow these instructions:

Release fuel pressure by cracking the feed line loose that goes to the throttle body, it will leak fuel and release pressure. Retighten line once this is done. Next remove two Allen screws securing regulator hold down to the passenger-side (non-linkage side), remove hold down and pull regulator out, you may need to rotate the regulator back and forth as you pull to get it out easier. Repeat this process on the FCC regulator. With both regulators out grease both the large upper o-rings and the small lower o-rings with lithium based grease. With that done slowly slide each regulator into its respective port, they will slide in smoothly with little effort DO NOT force them in as this will damage the o-rings. then install hold down and Allen screws and snug them down. you have now switched regulators.

If you need any further info you can look at our tech forum/tech article section of fitechefi.com

 

One part that grabbed our attention is this:  Go Street, Mean Street = 43 PSI

 

So, I called FiTech Support and stated that I had the LS1 fuel regulator/fuel that was set to 58 PSI. The LS1 has a built return and this is how I have my return line setup. Could this my problem with the idle going from 800 RPM's to 1200 RPM's every other minute? Support stated that the 58 PSI could be causing this issue.  Now, since FiTech has stated the reduced the fuel PSI, I will need to re-configure my return line to take advantage of the built pressure regulator.  

 

I did some research on the FiTech EFi systems, and almost all pictures that saw, they had the return fuel plumed.

 

This weekend will be the return fuel line re-configuration fun.

 

mustang7173

 

Interesting. Thank you for posting. I am trying to understand how this would affect an external pump system that has no regulator and relies on FitTech's throttle body regulator.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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If you rely on the FiTech throttle body regulator you have to run a return line if the pressure to the throttle body is higher than specified.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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If you rely on the FiTech throttle body regulator you have to run a return line if the pressure to the throttle body is higher than specified.

Makes sense... thanks

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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All,

 

Another update here! A friend of mine who has 2 of the FiTech 600 Hp's EFI's found this on the FaceBook FiTech Technical Support group.

 

Fitech just posted this to the fitech facebook group.  I still have not figured out how this affects us, but you need to read it....

 

Here is the be all end all on fuel pressure. Please read fully before Commenting.

IGNORE all previous instruction besides what is below. Our new instructions will have the below in them.

Go Street, Mean Street = 43 PSI

(if you are using an FCC simply change your EFI regulator over to the FCC and vise versa, for all external regulators set them to 43PSI) Go EFI 4 600, 600 PA, 1200PA, Dual Quad 625HP, Dual quad 1200PA = 58PSI If you have a FCC, Inline pump kit, aftermarket inline kit, aftermarket in tank pump kit, aftermarket return style regulator, aftermarket filter regulator (corvette filter regulator), or any other combination of the ones above, then you can use them with our system so long as they are set to the respective pressures for that unit.

Vacuum line routing:

The regulator vacuum line MUST be connected to MANIFOLD vacuum (rear passenger side 3/16 vacuum port), this is true for ALL regulators we offer. Be that on single Throttle Body, Dual Quad (both regulators if using both return ports, single regulator if your only using one TB for return), or FCC. You can "T" into this line if you need manifold vacuum for other accessories. For boosted applications you must route the regulator to a boost reference. For blow thru applications it would go to the same rear passenger 3/16 vacuum port on the TB, for draw thru applications (roots style supercharged, draw through turbo) we must route the vacuum reference to below the supercharger or in the intake in some fashion to get both vacuum and boost reference from this location for proper pressure compensation.The regulators need vacuum to help lower the fuel pressure at idle or increase fuel pressure under boost which helps fuel trim needs of the system to properly control fuel and AFR Fuel pump restrictions:

340LPH or lower LPH can be used directly with our system with our regulators. If you are using a larger pump (anything larger than 340LPH such as an Aeromotive A1000 for example) than you must use and external regulator system with its own return (making sure to block our return with the supplied plug) and set the regulator to to respective pressure for that unit.

Over pressure:

If you are using a fuel system with a Mean street, or the Go Street and cannot regulate down to 43PSI, the system will compensate but it may make your trim and learn percentage pull out fuel and this could affect your overall fueling and could be slightly rich at idle. It won't damage anything but it won't be optimal for fuel consumption.

To swap regulators follow these instructions:

Release fuel pressure by cracking the feed line loose that goes to the throttle body, it will leak fuel and release pressure. Retighten line once this is done. Next remove two Allen screws securing regulator hold down to the passenger-side (non-linkage side), remove hold down and pull regulator out, you may need to rotate the regulator back and forth as you pull to get it out easier. Repeat this process on the FCC regulator. With both regulators out grease both the large upper o-rings and the small lower o-rings with lithium based grease. With that done slowly slide each regulator into its respective port, they will slide in smoothly with little effort DO NOT force them in as this will damage the o-rings. then install hold down and Allen screws and snug them down. you have now switched regulators.

If you need any further info you can look at our tech forum/tech article section of fitechefi.com

 

One part that grabbed our attention is this:  Go Street, Mean Street = 43 PSI

 

So, I called FiTech Support and stated that I had the LS1 fuel regulator/fuel that was set to 58 PSI. The LS1 has a built return and this is how I have my return line setup. Could this my problem with the idle going from 800 RPM's to 1200 RPM's every other minute? Support stated that the 58 PSI could be causing this issue.  Now, since FiTech has stated the reduced the fuel PSI, I will need to re-configure my return line to take advantage of the built pressure regulator.  

 

I did some research on the FiTech EFi systems, and almost all pictures that saw, they had the return fuel plumed.

 

This weekend will be the return fuel line re-configuration fun.

 

mustang7173

 

Interesting. Thank you for posting. I am trying to understand how this would affect an external pump system that has no regulator and relies on FitTech's throttle body regulator.

 

tony-muscle,

 

I was reading a brochure and instructions that came with my FiTech system, while my Workstation was updating,  and read of the three fuel inlets that are available to the FiTech system. Since the fuel would come from one of those points, it would fill up the fuel chambers. The fourth point, the return line, would be sensed, the regulator would actively regulate the pressure per the preset pressure. Just one of those Ah ha moments there!  

 

My current set may work better on the HP-600 FiTech that would required the higher fuel pressures due to the higher horse power of the target engine. My current setup here is not a very good plan here at all.

 

mustang7173   :)

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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  • 2 weeks later...

All,

 

Finally finished my return fuel line. Just wore me out. Not the spring chicken I once was. The silver line is the Classic Tubes fuel line. The green is the one I modified to fit along the current fuel line path.

 

 

Return_Fuel_2.jpg

 

Return_Fuel_3.jpg

 

Return_Fuel_5.jpg

 

image processing service

 

Any Questions, please ask.

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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  • 4 weeks later...

All,

 

I had to re-route the return line just a bit to get the pinch in my return fuel hose.

 

 

fuel.jpg

 

 

Please Note: I have revamped this setup and used the new fuel filter TNK-FF-10 to take advantage of the built in pressure regulator of the FiTech 400.

 

 

EFI_0.jpg

 

 

 

FF_10.jpg

 

Source: http://www.tanksinc.com/index.cfm/page/ptype=product/product_id=432/category_id=61/mode=prod/prd432.htm

 

If you have any questions, please ask!

 

 

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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All, Here is the clamps I purchased. I had to drill several out for the 1/4 bolts used in the original single tube clamps.

 

 

clamps.jpg

 

 

Source: Amazon

 

 

Spring_Wrap_3_8.jpg

 

https://www.thestopshop.com/brake-tube-guard-armor/38-spring-wrap-for-steel-fuel-line-8-ft

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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  • 4 months later...

All,

 

Highly recommended to any fuel injection unit add-on. I finally added this ground strap to the base of my FiTech 400 and what a difference it made in how it runs.

 

 

 

ground.jpg

 

http://www.autozone.com/gaskets-and-miscellaneous-fasteners/ground-strap/help-universal-ground-strap/98830_0_0?cmpid=PS:3:3:1&s_kwcid=AL!5142!3!193277981032!!!!295715380239!&ef_id=WcbiXwAABbsmGwVd:20170923224345:s

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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  • 4 months later...

All,

 

An update to the FiTech saga! I sent my FiTech 400 back to FiTech for evaluation since the rpms oscillates. FiTech found no issues. They did send me a new O2 sensor. I found a new FiTech Forum that is not bad.

 

https://www.fitechefituning.com/

 

One item that stood out was the Tach wiring and EMI interference.

 

Fi_Tech_Tach_Harness.jpg

 

Excerpt from Wiring FiTech Forum

 

Seems the blue tach wire is very vulnerable to electronic noise or RF noise, which interferes with the tach signal and it can cause an over rich condition. I had this problem and being an electronics guy that fixes CT scanners I decided to find an easy solution.

I went to my local electronics store and bought 6' of braided RF shielding. I then soldered a ground wire on to the shielding that was later attached to the chassis. Once that was done I pulled the blue wire out of the FiTech harness and installed the shielding. Put the wire back in the harness and ran it through my firewall along with every other wire in my engine compartment. My ignition box (Mallory High-fire 6al) is under my dash. Once all my wires where ran I connected the blue tach wire to my yellow tach wire from the box and grounded the shielding with the ground wire i installed earlier. I also installed a couple of EMI RF clamps. Using my Fluke 1503 ground tester I got a reading of 0.73 ohms resistance between the negative battery post and any point on my shielding.

This takes about 15 min to do and will almost guarantee you don’t get noise on the tach wire. The shielding cost less than a $1 a foot and the clamps probably aren’t needed but i had them laying around. Every system may not need this but its cheap insurance IMO

 

I will be doing this weekend.

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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All,

 

An update to the FiTech saga! I sent my FiTech 400 back to FiTech for evaluation since the rpms oscillates. FiTech found no issues.  They did send me a new O2 sensor. I found a new FiTech Forum that is not bad.

 

https://www.fitechefituning.com/

 

One item that stood out was the Tach wiring and EMI interference.

 

Fi_Tech_Tach_Harness.jpg

 

Excerpt from Wiring FiTech Forum

 

Seems the blue tach wire is very vulnerable to electronic noise or RF noise, which interferes with the tach signal and it can cause an over rich condition. I had this problem and being an electronics guy that fixes CT scanners I decided to find an easy solution.

I went to my local electronics store and bought 6' of braided RF shielding. I then soldered a ground wire on to the shielding that was later attached to the chassis. Once that was done I pulled the blue wire out of the FiTech harness and installed the shielding. Put the wire back in the harness and ran it through my firewall along with every other wire in my engine compartment. My ignition box (Mallory High-fire 6al) is under my dash. Once all my wires where ran I connected the blue tach wire to my yellow tach wire from the box and grounded the shielding with the ground wire i installed earlier. I also installed a couple of EMI RF clamps. Using my Fluke 1503 ground tester I got a reading of 0.73 ohms resistance between the negative battery post and any point on my shielding.

This takes about 15 min to do and will almost guarantee you don’t get noise on the tach wire. The shielding cost less than a $1 a foot and the clamps probably aren’t needed but i had them laying around. Every system may not need this but its cheap insurance IMO

 

I will be doing this weekend.

 

Thank you for the tip. I have not had problems with the tach, but I am interested in this. Did you shield only the "blue" wire all the way from the ignition box to the FiTech module, or did you also shield the wire that goes to the tach inside the car?

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Tony,

 

I am looking into shielding the FiTech harness, blue wire, that connects to the ignition coil or to the tach out wire from a CDI box. It is the wire the FiTech EMC reads. The EMI could come from the Coil and the alternator.

 

I am not looking into shielding the factory tach wire. From what I have read, grounding is very important.

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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Tony,

 

I am looking into shielding the FiTech harness, blue wire, that connects to the ignition coil or to the tach out wire from a CDI box. It is the wire the FiTech EMC reads. The EMI could come from the Coil and the alternator.

 

I  am not looking into shielding the factory tach wire.  From what I have read, grounding is very important.

 

You are right, grounding the shield is important. This document has a good explanation: https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/alphawire-Understanding-Shielded-Cable.pdf

Basically, the shield reflects some of the energy, from what is not reflected some is then conducted. If not grounded, then it can't be conducted.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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tony-muscle,

 

Great Information here!

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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that's a great idea. I will be installing the wiring tomorrow. I actually have a few ignition noise suppressors I can toss in there as well. I really like the routing of your fuel line,

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All,

 

Replaced my valve cover gaskets Saturday. Installed Vacuum Smoker and, Dang it! The stupid intake is leaking again. I had replaced the intake gasket not long ago. Back to the re-installation process. You Tube, he we go!

 

Found a good You Tube on aluminum head to aluminum intakes install.

 

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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so the FiTech is all installed. but I'm having trouble getting to start up easy and run correctly. I have to open the throttle after it fires and rev it a little to get it to stay running and idle. what settings did you play with that helped the most? I've already raised and lowered the cold cranking adjustment and it didn't help much.

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so the FiTech is all installed.  but I'm having trouble getting to start up easy and run correctly.  I have to open the throttle after it fires and rev it a little to get it to stay running and idle.  what settings did you play with that helped the most?  I've already raised and lowered the cold cranking adjustment and it didn't help much.

 

In this guide check the section about idle in Page 4, http://fitechefi.com/fitech-uploads/2016/07/QuickStartGuideFinalV5.pdf

I think that once you adjust the "idle" screw it would work well. Ignore the whole stuff about timing in that document. Then make sure you follow the instructions to set IACs: http://fitechefi.com/tech-posts/fitech-efi-basic-setup-instructions/

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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she, I missed that part. I thought these only one there was the iac screw. thanks!! I'll go try it

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All,

 

Here is the issue with my intake leak thus, likely causing my erratic up and down behavior during run time.

 

 

1973_Mustang_mis_mateched_intake_0.jpg

 

I replaced the intake gasket by locating the gasket to the intake ports and holding in place with RTV. I let the RTV dry and the installed.

 

This maybe my Bone head award of the year!

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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7173Mustangs.com is a community forum designed especially for fans and owners of the 1971, 1972 and 1973 Ford Mustang! We are not affiliated with Ford Motor Company in any way.

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Site Info

Founded:
July 2010

By:
Webfinity Design

From:
Latrobe, PA

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