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RAM air flaps control


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For whatever reason I like the idea of being able to manually control the ram air flaps instead of them only opening when you step on the gas. Will the intake work more efficiently with the flaps open when cruising down the highway?

It will be as easy as installing an inline vacuum solenoid switch that will shut off at the press of a button to open the flaps. There are a lot of vacuum solenoids, but the ones I find are normally close ones. Ideally, I would like to find a vacuum solenoid that is normally open, and that when electrified, it will shut off. It will be an easy and cheap way of controlling the flaps.

Is this a waste of time?

Do you know of any vacuum solenoids that operate normally open?

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Since the engine vacuum holds the ram air plates closed. a simple manual switch would allow you shut off the vacuum and open the plates while driving whenever you wanted to.

 

2082470233_Vaccumswitch.jpg.b1cbfde97a909a274fed634ef99de32a.jpg

 

Used to see this now and then back in the 70's and 80's on those rare cars that actually had a ram air setup. Usually mounted within reach under driver's dash. Its just a matter of extending the vacuum supply hose inside the vehicle and back out to the vacuum motors.

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Since the engine vacuum holds the ram air plates closed. a simple manual switch would allow you shut off the vacuum and open the plates while driving whenever you wanted to.

 

 

 

Used to see this now and then back in the 70's and 80's on those rare cars that actually had a ram air setup. Usually mounted within reach under driver's dash. Its just a matter of extending the vacuum supply hose inside the vehicle and back out to the vacuum motors.

 

I was thinking of a solenoid activated valve. It will be activated by an electrical switch.

Something like these:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dautomotive&field-keywords=solenoid+vacuum+valve

 

However, I don't know if these are normally open or close.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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I have heard lots of people say that the hood does not work but it is easy to tell. The old time hot rodders use to put strips of yarn on the body of their cars so they could see the air flow at speed, take pictures.

A guy here runs at Bonneville and runs a Mustang 2 with a Chevy drive train. He held his class record and is a member of the 200 mph club. He runs a very small CI I think like 250. He was running one of the high hood scoops like the pro stock guys run. One of his friends works in the Ford wind tunnel in Atlanta. He convinced him to build another hood and use the NASA scoop design. So he did and after he had made passes with his old hood he put the new NASA hood on and made a pass. This car has electronic fuel injection on it. It melted several pistons on that run because the hood flowed so much more air it leaned out the mixture too much.

The same guy at the wind tunnel said most cars would go faster turned backwards. Not enough attention paid to the rear of the car. Look at a jet plane rounded front and pointed rear to let the air flow off and not hold back. A super sonic plane is pointed on both ends.

If you want to see if air is going into the scoops tape pieces of knitting yarn in front of and around the scoops, 4"-6" long and go down the road. If you have a GoPro mount on the hood. If the yarn goes into the scoop then it is working if it goes around it not working.

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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Here is one. You have to sleeve 12v DC in the drop down.

 

http://www.dudadiesel.com/choose_item.php?id=2W04008KN

73 Grande H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

 

- Jason

 

 

082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg

 

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Some of the '73 Mustangs with 351s had a normally open solenoid vacuum valve in the emissions system, but lots of luck finding one of those.

 

If you do find a valve that will work, you'll also have to have some way to bleed the vacuum off, between the valve and the flapper motors, otherwise the vacuum will be trapped and keep the flappers closed (assuming there are no leaks).

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Some of the '73 Mustangs with 351s had a normally open solenoid vacuum valve in the emissions system, but lots of luck finding one of those.

 

If you do find a valve that will work, you'll also have to have some way to bleed the vacuum off, between the valve and the flapper motors, otherwise the vacuum will be trapped and keep the flappers closed (assuming there are no leaks).

 

That's a good point. you would almost have to use both a normally open valve and a normally closed valve in conjunction. Have both operate form the same switch feed and place the normally closed valve between the normally open valve and the flappers. The normally closed valve can then open up and bleed off the vacuum when the switch is activated. Hope this helps.

73 Grande H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

 

- Jason

 

 

082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg

 

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I think I may have found the solution. The EGR VSV valve is a vented solenoid valve that appears to be normally open.

That will be Dorman's 911-604 for Toyota. This links explain how they function, http://www.fixkick.com/sensors/vsv.html .

They are normally open and when closed they vent the close end to release the vacuum.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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I think I may have found the solution. The EGR VSV valve is a vented solenoid valve that appears to be normally open.

That will be Dorman's 911-604 for Toyota. This links explain how they function, http://www.fixkick.com/sensors/vsv.html .

They are normally open and when closed they vent the close end to release the vacuum.

 

Sounds like that would do everything you need. And only $32 on Amazon.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Dorman-911-604-Toyota-Vacuum-Switching/dp/B003VCDFCE

73 Grande H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

 

- Jason

 

 

082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg

 

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I have been confused since the first post on this subject. Somebody tell me what I'm missin. Since rompin on then gas opens the flaps, that tells me that vacuum opens the flaps. Vacuum increases at higher rpm, right? So wouldn't you need a constant vacuum source to "pull" the flaps open at all times?

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I have been confused since the first post on this subject. Somebody tell me what I'm missin. Since rompin on then gas opens the flaps, that tells me that vacuum opens the flaps. Vacuum increases at higher rpm, right? So wouldn't you need a constant vacuum source to "pull" the flaps open at all times?

The flaps are normally open when no vacuum. When there is vacuum they close. A no vacuum condition exists when you stomp on the gas. So if you want to keep them manually open you need to cut the vacuum. Hence the vacuum switch to cut the vavuum off.

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Just some thoughts here. I have read some articles about the benefits of the Ram Air system and the HP gains are negligible. Maybe if you are doing 150+ mph would you start seeing any gains. it is more of a cool factor than anything else. Those flapper valves are so far back that you really can't see them operate anyway unless you are bent over looking into the duct and there's someone else gunning the motor. That being said I did make the Ram Air functional during my resto project because I had the hood anyway and it wasn't available on a Q code motor and I thought it was cool too. Not sure if I would go through the trouble of making it manually operable with a solenoid though. It would be great to see how it works though :-)

 

There is another option to make this work. The air grabber hood on the early Dodge cars used a mechanical vacuum switch on the dash to operate the Air Grabber door. These parts are reproduced and it would be easy to adapt to the Mustang Ram Air system. A good place to mount the switch would be in the center console ashtray if you have the console, that way you would not need to modify the dash. I removed the ashtray and made a plate to cover the hole and mounted some switches on it and the ashtray sliding door covers them so you don't know that they are there. You could also do that with the vacuum switch.

 

I always enjoy seeing how everyone personalize their cars and the solutions/designs that are created to make things work.

-john

(jbojo)

351C 4V cc heads, 10.5 : 1 CR, 290 Herbert cam, Flat top forged pistons, forged connecting rods, Atomic efi,

C6 with Gear Vendor overdrive, 3.89 Tru Trac, Hooker Super Comp with 2 1/2" Pypes Exhaust.        

 

Some Mod pictures can be seen at: [button=http://www.7173mustangs.com/forum-garage?filterxt_uid=2026]Bojo's Garage[/button]

 

 

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Something I've always wondered about in regards to the flappers. Is there any different tuning on the engine that would need to be done to take advantage of the extra air flowing in? Or would more air plus WOT more gas, be more power?

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You would need to make sure there is enough fuel going through the carburetor via main and secondary jets and power valve. The combination of cooler (denser) air and supposedly faster air flow could lean out the engine if not set up correctly. You would also need to make sure the total timing was set correctly.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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EFI should be able to handle some of this adjustment, or not?

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Yes, especially with a self learning system that uses a wide-band O2 sensor. Systems that rely on fuel mapping, whether or not used with an O2 sensor, may not be able to make enough adjustments on the fly.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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I should have the efi and the solenoid going by this summer. I will let you guys know if the tires start spining after flipping the switch at 70 MPH

 

1971 M-code Mach 1

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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That'll be interesting to see if the ram air does or does not make a seat of the pants difference.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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You would need to make sure there is enough fuel going through the carburetor via main and secondary jets and power valve. The combination of cooler (denser) air and supposedly faster air flow could lean out the engine if not set up correctly. You would also need to make sure the total timing was set correctly.

 

Thanks don! So it sounds like if the car came with the ram air system from the factory then the carb would be rejetted and adjusted to accommodate that. Could the ram-air carb be attached to another Mach without the ram air or would someone need to be aware of what type of setup the carb was coming from (ram-air car vs non ram-air car)?

 

Thanks!

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I'm not sure if Ford calibrated ram air carburetors differently or not, especially for '71s. By '73 I'm guessing they did due to emissions.

 

From the factory the carburetors were set up so they would function through a wide range of altitudes and atmospheric conditions and as such were kind of one size fits all.

 

It really doesn't make any difference if they did or not, jets and power valve changes are easy to do.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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  • 2 years later...

I wanted to follow up on this thread. The other day I finally tested the manual air ram control with the EFI system. I was cruising at about 50 mph and when I turned the switch on which opens the air ram flaps the AFR increased to about 15-16 for a split second until the EFI system compensates with more fuel turning it down to 14ish. This is not a WOT so I can control the opening and closing of the flaps manually through the vacuum solenoid I installed. These results indicate that there is definitely more air being pushed down the intake. I tried several times with consistent results. Now, the real question is, does it make a significant power impact and I don't have a real answer for it since I was not measuring acceleration or anything like that. So the jury still is open in regards to it adding power or not. My guess is that it ought to be adding some power since more air and fuel are going down the intake. However, the magnitude of the power increase is debatable.

 

PS: I ended up using the Dorman's 911-604 vacuum switch activated by a switch inside the car.

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Do you have any pics of the install?

73 Grande H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

 

- Jason

 

 

082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg

 

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Here are some pictures I took last night.

 

The solenoid valve is under that tower brace in the circled area:

20190508-214619-edit.jpg

 

This is a close-up of underneath the brace. I added the vacuum elbow fitting and cemented it to the solenoid.

The arrows point towards the engine:

20190508-214814-edit.jpg

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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