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Ford Front Suspension Support Tool by Tommy Zees


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All,

 

I remembered that I purchased a new coil spring compressor from Tommy Zees. So, I emailed Tommy Zees to see if could make the Ford front suspension support tool. Sure enough, he could!

 

 

Front_Suspenion_tool_0.jpg

 

 

Front_Suspenion_tool_1.jpg

 

I was able to pick them up for $50.00 a pair and that includes shipping.

 

I email Tommy Zees back to see if it was okay to place this information on the mustangs7173 forum for members to be able to order.

 

Here is his contact information to pick up a pair. You call or email him and he will sell the pair for $50.00

 

He plans on selling them on Ebay for $60.00. The extra $10.00 is to help cover his E-bay fees. Any member can contact Tommy Zees  @ tommyzees@msn.com  or call him @ 1-915-490-6644. Please let him know that you are a member of the forum.

 

Thanks

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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All,

 

I remembered that I purchased a new coil spring compressor from Tommy Zees. So, I emailed Tommy Zees to see if could make the Ford front suspension support tool. Sure enough, he could!

 

 

Front_Suspenion_tool_0.jpg

 

 

Front_Suspenion_tool_1.jpg

 

I was able to pick them up for $50.00 a pair and that includes shipping.

 

I email Tommy Zees back to see if it was okay to place this information on the mustangs7173 forum for members to be able to order.

 

Here is his contact information to pick up a pair. You call or email him and he will sell the pair for $50.00

 

He plans on selling them on Ebay for $60.00. The extra $10.00 is to help cover his E-bay fees. Any member can contact Tommy Zees  @ tommyzees@msn.com  or call him @ 1-915-490-6644. Please let him know that you are a member of the forum.

 

Thanks

 

mustang7173

 

Nice job on this design, not sure about the asking price, but to each their own...

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This ties in to a recent post by SteveO_71 with an article in Mustang 360, "Lifting Cars and Suspension Damage" , 12/09/2016 and a post by myself, "Lift it Right" , in the Maintenance and Repair section, as reported in Mustang Monthly, March edition.

The response was as expected, totally unnecessary. Everyone who responded, reported no damage to any of their cars suspension (or at least had not noticed..... yet). However, reading SteveO_71's post, a member did mention that he had heard that some had reported damage to the suspension. So is this a necessary tool when lifting these cars? you tell me.

As for the tool shown in the picture, it will likely to the job. I'm sorry, but it is a piece of crap for 50 bucks. I could make those for 10 including material and better, but I'm not about to. I would hope that the guy making them will at least make then look  like a pro tool, then they might be worth 50 bucks, but no more. Then there's shipping (and taxes) and for us in Canada, a high exchange rate.

As one member said in my post, "a piece of wood would do the same thing". I guess at least someone has seen an opportunity to supply a tool that is unavailable elsewhere. I just would like to see it look the part as most do not have the skills to make their own.

Okay, that's my rant for the day, take it or leave it.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Yes, it is a necessary tool under certain circumstances...

 

 That's funny you say that. Please don't get me wrong, I DO think it is a necessary tool especially for long periods of time, but I'm confused by your reply in the post "Lift it Right" where you say "I have always put my Mustang on jackstands over winter with no issues". Doesn't that qualify as "certain circumstances"?

It is not my intent to pick on anybody, but in two separate threads, there are contradictions. My original question was that I had never heard for the need of such a tool, is it necessary? Most think not, so at the end of the day, it comes down to personal choice to use the braces or not. I don't think there is any need for further comments.

Again, thanks to all for the input, it's been interesting.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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To me, the only time it would be useful is when changing front shocks. But, I have a good collection of 2x4 blocks, so I'll save myself $50. On second thoughts, I have enough scrap iron laying around I'd just cobble something together if I didn't have wood blocks.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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It goes between the upper control arm and a lip on the frame. This is the article with the picture:

http://www.mustangandfords.com/how-to/chassis-suspension/1612-lift-classic-mustangs-and-avoid-suspension-damage/

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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All,

 

Wow, what responses here. By the way, the tool is made per the Ford Diagram.

 

Front_Support_tool_Ford.gif

 

I would imagine that if it was not necessary, then Ford would not have made the tool for the manufacturing line. All, this was just available opportunity to get the tool if you want it. It is your option!

 

mustang7173

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

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That is a useful post with the dimensions. However, pictured in the printed article, the tool Ford used was cast. Maybe others have designed a weldment similar to the Bob Perkins design, but even more simple to make. ( I missed that you mentioned it was a Ford designed piece)

It would seem now that as most of us had never seen or heard of this tool, the first reaction was it is not necessary, now some are changing their minds. As mentioned before, the takeaway on it is simply this, be aware that damaged could occur to the suspension and decide for oneself to use it or not.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Looks pretty simple to make. I'm gonna make my own like Tommy Zee did with a piece of angle iron to eliminate a weld. Thank's for posting the dimensions & the pics guys!

John - 72 Q Code

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I'm interested in getting feedback from anyone that has tried to use these. How easy, or difficult, is it for one person to get them set in place and then jack up or lift the car?

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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I'm interested in getting feedback from anyone that has tried to use these. How easy, or difficult, is it for one person to get them set in place and then jack up or lift the car?

 

Yes Don, that will be interesting feedback.

Now we have dimensions thanks to mustang7173, I think many will rethink this. These only need be 1/4" X 1 1/2" CRS with 1/4 X 1/2 angle (or cut to size required) and 1 weld. A coat of pretty paint would finish them off nice.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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I still find it hard to believe these are necessary. Going over a speed bump at 5 mph allows your front suspension to fully extend, at force, on the downstream side of the bump. I really don't believe the extended front suspension is all that fragile.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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I still find it hard to believe these are necessary. Going over a speed bump at 5 mph allows your front suspension to fully extend, at force, on the downstream side of  the bump. I really don't believe the extended front suspension is all that fragile.

 

 I tend to agree.

Lets face it, some Ford engineers or whom ever, came up with some pretty weird stuff back in the day, which to this day has us scratching our heads as to "why"! This just could be one of those weird ideas that stuck.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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According to my Ford Shop Manual the only time the tool is used is when the ball joints are being replaced, which makes sense. Either the tool would have to be used or the spring compressed to do this.

 

They do have precautions when hoisting, but they deal with getting the hoist arms and adapters set correctly and that none of the hoist arms or adapters contacts the steering assembly.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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According to my Ford Shop Manual the only time the tool is used is when the ball joints are being replaced, which makes sense. Either the tool would have to be used or the spring compressed to do this.

 

They do have precautions when hoisting, but they deal with getting the hoist arms and adapters set correctly and that none of the hoist arms or adapters contacts the steering assembly.

 

Don, that makes more sense. Good work on the research, thanks. It is looking more like over the years, the need or use of this tool has been exaggerated and has been published as such. Even the so-called experts can be wrong and often are!!

It would definitely be a PITA to use, but it may have some warrant for a car being stored on jackstands for a long period of time, like years.

At the end of the day, it comes down to personal choice, use 'em or not.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Having done two suspension rebuilds on a couple of cars, the tool makes perfect sense if you are doing any service work on the spindles, lower control arms, any balljoint or the swaybars. It would act as a nice third hand to take the droop out of the suspension and the spring loading off the lower suspension. Even witht he spring off the car and assembling new suspension it is easier to do with the upper control arm held up and supported. Necessary? No, but certainly convenient. I don't weld and the nearest steel supply joint is more than 30 minutes from home, so $50 a pair shipping included sounds decent.

I must confess, I did not know Ford recommended using them for supporting the front suspension when lifting up the car, I always thought they were for front end servicing.

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My '71 Ford shop manual does not recommend them for lifting, only for ball joints.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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  • 3 months later...

Seems like there has been a lot of discussion on this, but I think I have something to add. I was changing my front shocks over the weekend, got the old ones out by removing the lower nuts first then the top and shock tower nuts, no problem. However when I went to install the new ones, I installed the lower nuts first and discovered the top of the shock did not align vertically with the shock tower, as it was leaning 3 inches or so towards the side of the car? I tried to push it towards the center of the shock tower so I could reinstall the cap, and it would not budge. I had to remove the lower shock mount outside nut, and loosen the inner nut almost all the way out to get enough play in the shock to get it to mount on top. I realized at that point that what happened, and what happens every time we raise the vehicle, is that the plane of the upper control arm dips toward the outside of vehicle putting significant pressure on the length of the extended shock, trying to bow it outward, as the top of the shock is mounted to the shock tower cap and cannot move. At that point I lowered it to the ground and installed the lower nuts with the car on the ground, and did the opposite side R&R without lifting it. While the rubber shock bushings no doubt take a beating when the car is raised and the wheel is lowered, I think its the force trying to bend the shock into an arc that seems to be the problem, and I would bet the reason for the tool that Ford created. There really isn't any weight bearing down on the top shock bushing when its raised because the extension of the shock allows it to rest at the bottom point of the the control arm arc. Before this weekend I would have said this tool was no big deal, but now I'm not so sure. I don't know if I will raise the car in the future without disconnecting the top shock mount and removing the shock tower cap. Food for thought.

 

Scott

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Thought I would throw this out there. I do understand the reason and the need for using the tool. Another think lots of people do that destroys their front suspension is turn the steering wheel without the tires rolling. You say what difference would that make.

When you turn the steering wheel the center line of the ball joints tries to move fore, aft and tilt in and out due to the geometry built into the steering. If your are moving slightly the tire rotation allows for the pressure to be taken off the strut rod bushings, ball joints etc. If you are not rolling it is trying to drag the tire on the surface and puts many times the force on all the joints causing a much earlier failure of them.

Back in 73 when my Mach 1 was new I use to run autocross with it. twice I slid into a curb once almost rolled the car. Both times I had to change the ball joints from the one hit force.

My current F-150 has 277,000 miles on it and just went through the yearly inspection. Ball joints are fine. My sons F-150 that he just traded in had worn out ball joints that ate up his tires. His had 125,000 miles. He has the habit of turning the wheel without rolling and it ate up the joints. His previous truck I had to replace the joints on it failed inspection probably cause by the same thing.

If you do not understand what I am saying go out and get someone to turn the wheel from lock to lock while not moving and you watch the forces on the tire and suspension. Then do it rolling and see the difference. The loads applied go way down.

My old 69 For van had the twin I beam front end, no ball joints. When I got the van it had 75,000 miles on it and the king pins bushings and king pins were worn and I replaced them, groves in pins and bushings egg shaped. When I scrapped the van after 467,000 miles and a crash I took the front spindles off to use on a Mustang rear body trailer I am going to build. The king pins and bushings had no wear on them.

The force of the suspension hanging at full extension does harm the joints in our cars and does damage over time so the tool is a good thing.

Dropping the clutch and hauling ass does damage but I won't stop doing that, lol.

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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I agree, David, turning the steering wheel while stationary places a huge load on all of the steering and front suspension. I think those of us that began driving, especially heavier vehicles, before everything had power steering learned that moving while utilizing "armstrong power steering" made it a lot easier to turn the steering wheel and we still tend to turn while moving.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Seems like there has been a lot of discussion on this, but I think I have something to add.  I was changing my front shocks over the weekend, got the old ones out by removing the lower nuts first then the top and shock tower nuts, no problem.  However when I went to install the new ones, I installed the lower nuts first and discovered the top of the shock did not align vertically with the shock tower, as it was leaning 3 inches or so towards the side of the car?  I tried to push it towards the center of the shock tower so I could reinstall the cap, and it would not budge.  I had to remove the lower shock mount outside nut, and loosen the inner nut almost all the way out to get enough play in the shock to get it to mount on top.  I realized at that point that what happened, and what happens every time we raise the vehicle, is that the plane of the upper control arm dips toward the outside of vehicle putting significant pressure on the length of the extended shock, trying to bow it outward, as the top of the shock is mounted to the shock tower cap and cannot move.  At that point I lowered it to the ground and installed the lower nuts with the car on the ground, and did the opposite side R&R without lifting it.  While the rubber shock bushings no doubt take a beating when the car is raised and the wheel is lowered, I think its the force trying to bend the shock into an arc that seems to be the problem, and I would bet the reason for the tool that Ford created.  There really isn't any weight bearing down on the top shock bushing when its raised because the extension of the shock allows it to rest at the bottom point of the the control arm arc.  Before this weekend I would have said this tool was no big deal, but now I'm not so sure.  I don't know if I will raise the car in the future without disconnecting the top shock mount and removing the shock tower cap.  Food for thought.

 

Scott

 

The shock lower end mounts to the spring seat/perch. It sounds like the bushing in the spring perch is not moving very much. As the suspension moves up and down the springs should cause the perch to rotate and not place a large side load on the shocks.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Seems like there has been a lot of discussion on this, but I think I have something to add.  I was changing my front shocks over the weekend, got the old ones out by removing the lower nuts first then the top and shock tower nuts, no problem.  However when I went to install the new ones, I installed the lower nuts first and discovered the top of the shock did not align vertically with the shock tower, as it was leaning 3 inches or so towards the side of the car?  I tried to push it towards the center of the shock tower so I could reinstall the cap, and it would not budge.  I had to remove the lower shock mount outside nut, and loosen the inner nut almost all the way out to get enough play in the shock to get it to mount on top.  I realized at that point that what happened, and what happens every time we raise the vehicle, is that the plane of the upper control arm dips toward the outside of vehicle putting significant pressure on the length of the extended shock, trying to bow it outward, as the top of the shock is mounted to the shock tower cap and cannot move.  At that point I lowered it to the ground and installed the lower nuts with the car on the ground, and did the opposite side R&R without lifting it.  While the rubber shock bushings no doubt take a beating when the car is raised and the wheel is lowered, I think its the force trying to bend the shock into an arc that seems to be the problem, and I would bet the reason for the tool that Ford created.  There really isn't any weight bearing down on the top shock bushing when its raised because the extension of the shock allows it to rest at the bottom point of the the control arm arc.  Before this weekend I would have said this tool was no big deal, but now I'm not so sure.  I don't know if I will raise the car in the future without disconnecting the top shock mount and removing the shock tower cap.  Food for thought.

 

Scott

 

The shock lower end mounts to the spring seat/perch. It sounds like the bushing in the spring perch is not moving very much. As the suspension moves up and down the springs should cause the perch to rotate and not place a large side load on the shocks.

 

Don is correct here. I had the same "side load" issue with mine. The spring perches installed there is no issue with side load on the shocks.

73 Grande H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

 

- Jason

 

 

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