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Parts list for my 351C 1983 Rebuild


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I  was wondering if  anyone  had any thoughts on my motor build and help identifying a  part  number.    

 

 

I recently found the  rebuild receipt that  came with my  72  Mach  1.   The motor is a 351C and the parts list date is 9/2/1983.   Since  the  car sat for  30 years it is a  fairly  fresh  motor so  I figured I'd leave  it  alone.     The  CAM is  a Sealed  Power CS-173R and based on  what  I've found,  it explains the lope.

 

After a few hours  on the  web,  I  was able  to  identify all  of  the parts  of  the rebuild  except for the  (what I think) are the pistons.

 

I was  wondering  if  anyone here might know  where  to point me  or  if the  part number  on  the  list makes sense.

 

It  is listed as Sealed  Power  2403P-30

 

I was able to find all of the  other parts based on the person's handwriting,  but  not this one.    I've found  WL-2403 and  others that are close.   

 

Any help or recommendations  as to  the build  is  welcome!  Thanks!

 

 

Rebuild_Parts.png

 

 

SP173_Spcs.jpg

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The only reason I can see that the Chevy pistons were installed is that rod length was changed, either because the builder believed that GM had a better idea or the engine was stroked. There may be another parts list you don't have that shows rods and crankshaft.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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I actually  knew the guys  that did  the build and they were huge Ford/Cougar 351W guys.  They convinced the guy who had it rebuilt to put in the aftermarket  Sealed Power  Boss 351-like cam .    Who knows if they would've used Chevy parts but not a bad idea to figure out the part number.  

 

But, I'm starting to think that the parts counter guy wrote it down wrong.

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I actually  knew the guys  that did  the build and they were huge Ford/Cougar 351W guys.  They convinced the guy who had it rebuilt to put in the aftermarket  Sealed Power  Boss 351-like cam .    Who knows if they would've used Chevy parts but not a bad idea to figure out the part number.  

 

But, I'm starting to think that the parts counter guy wrote it down wrong.

 

that's entirely possible too, if you really wanna know you can borescope it and look at the top and see if you see anything unique, other than that you might just have to crack it open. I cant think of a reason you really need to know for sure since you know the cam specs. If its good i'd just go with it and worry about it in 150k miles.

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The only reason I can see that the Chevy pistons were installed is that rod length was changed, either because the builder believed that GM had a better idea or the engine was stroked. There may be another parts list you don't have that shows rods and crankshaft.

 

So I found a GM similar piston to the part number -- SEALED POWER L2403NF and I get your point about no rods or crankshaft in the  receipt.   Thanks!

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I actually  knew the guys  that did  the build and they were huge Ford/Cougar 351W guys.  They convinced the guy who had it rebuilt to put in the aftermarket  Sealed Power  Boss 351-like cam .    Who knows if they would've used Chevy parts but not a bad idea to figure out the part number.  

 

But, I'm starting to think that the parts counter guy wrote it down wrong.

 

that's entirely possible too, if you really wanna know you can borescope it and look at the top and see if you see anything unique, other than that you might just have to crack it open. I cant think of a reason you really need to know for sure since you know the cam specs. If its good i'd just go with it and worry about it in 150k miles.

 

I  think we have a winner on this one!  I'll enjoy it!  I've been having really bad un-burnt fuel smell issues (I don't mind it, but the fam doesn't like riding in it)  and I  wanted to see if  I could dig up info on the cam, etc from the parts list.   I've set the idle mixture, timing is pretty much perfect, the only thing left is the jets -- it's an Edelbrock 1406 600 carb.  

 

But, since I posted the original post, I put in NGKs from Autolites and gapped a little larger due to Pertronix I/Flamethrower 40K and it has come alive.  Wow, what a difference.  It starts almost like an EFI car.     The odor is much less, but still present.  I guess I'll be driving solo!

 

Thanks again everyone!

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I actually  knew the guys  that did  the build and they were huge Ford/Cougar 351W guys.  They convinced the guy who had it rebuilt to put in the aftermarket  Sealed Power  Boss 351-like cam .    Who knows if they would've used Chevy parts but not a bad idea to figure out the part number.  

 

But, I'm starting to think that the parts counter guy wrote it down wrong.

 

that's entirely possible too, if you really wanna know you can borescope it and look at the top and see if you see anything unique, other than that you might just have to crack it open. I cant think of a reason you really need to know for sure since you know the cam specs. If its good i'd just go with it and worry about it in 150k miles.

 

I  think we have a winner on this one!  I'll enjoy it!  I've been having really bad un-burnt fuel smell issues (I don't mind it, but the fam doesn't like riding in it)  and I  wanted to see if  I could dig up info on the cam, etc from the parts list.   I've set the idle mixture, timing is pretty much perfect, the only thing left is the jets -- it's an Edelbrock 1406 600 carb.  

 

But, since I posted the original post, I put in NGKs from Autolites and gapped a little larger due to Pertronix I/Flamethrower 40K and it has come alive.  Wow, what a difference.  It starts almost like an EFI car.     The odor is much less, but still present.  I guess I'll be driving solo!

 

Thanks again everyone!

 

the fuel vapor canister can be a culprit in heavy fuel odor too,

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that's entirely possible too, if you really wanna know you can borescope it and look at the top and see if you see anything unique, other than that you might just have to crack it open. I cant think of a reason you really need to know for sure since you know the cam specs. If its good i'd just go with it and worry about it in 150k miles.

 

I  think we have a winner on this one!  I'll enjoy it!  I've been having really bad un-burnt fuel smell issues (I don't mind it, but the fam doesn't like riding in it)  and I  wanted to see if  I could dig up info on the cam, etc from the parts list.   I've set the idle mixture, timing is pretty much perfect, the only thing left is the jets -- it's an Edelbrock 1406 600 carb.  

 

But, since I posted the original post, I put in NGKs from Autolites and gapped a little larger due to Pertronix I/Flamethrower 40K and it has come alive.  Wow, what a difference.  It starts almost like an EFI car.     The odor is much less, but still present.  I guess I'll be driving solo!

 

Thanks again everyone!

 

the fuel vapor canister can be a culprit in heavy fuel odor too,

 

I  actually got a NOS one six months ago and replaced it.  Made the garage smell better but not much on the driving smell.   Thanks again!

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just out of curiosity what gas and or additives are you running? A 600 cfm carb on a 351 should be lean not rich............I ran a 600 on a 289 and it was lean.

 

Exxon 93 and Lead additive per tank since it was done back in the day.   I  don't know if it had hardened seats, but the last owner only put about 1000-2000 miles on it since the 83 rebuild when it was parked in  84.  He would start it from time to time, but never really drove it between 1984 to 1998 except in and out of his garage to move it.  

 

So it then sat hard from 1998 to 2016 when it went into storage and I bought it in early 2016, and got it running a year ago.   The owner had the intake/covers a loose and he told that he would spray WD-40 in the heads and down the chambers every six months or so for almost 20 years.   I  followed the Marvel Mystery Oil on the valves and let it seep in and let it sit for a few days (or something like that, its been two years) and turned it by hand to make sure that it hadn't seized. 

 

So when I  got it back together,  I  drained the oil/etc out and it  took a few  5qt pans to catch everything that came out.   Lots came out!  I've  since  changed the oil  twice, but I am wondering it just  needs to  blow out  all  of the  crud  from 20-30  years  of sitting.

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just out of curiosity what gas and or additives are you running? A 600 cfm carb on a 351 should be lean not rich............I ran a 600 on a 289 and it was lean.

 

Exxon 93 and Lead additive per tank since it was done back in the day.   I  don't know if it had hardened seats, but the last owner only put about 1000-2000 miles on it since the 83 rebuild when it was parked in  84.  He would start it from time to time, but never really drove it between 1984 to 1998 except in and out of his garage to move it.  

 

So it then sat hard from 1998 to 2016 when it went into storage and I bought it in early 2016, and got it running a year ago.   The owner had the intake/covers a loose and he told that he would spray WD-40 in the heads and down the chambers every six months or so for almost 20 years.   I  followed the Marvel Mystery Oil on the valves and let it seep in and let it sit for a few days (or something like that, its been two years) and turned it by hand to make sure that it hadn't seized. 

 

So when I  got it back together,  I  drained the oil/etc out and it  took a few  5qt pans to catch everything that came out.   Lots came out!  I've  since  changed the oil  twice, but I am wondering it just  needs to  blow out  all  of the  crud  from 20-30  years  of sitting.

if it sat with the carb on it for 20+ years then I would lean towards the carb being whacky, if it were mine, I'd run it dry and try a couple of gallons of regular and the lead additive and see if the fumes are better. Gas in 73 wasn't the highest of octanes lol and with a lil dirty burn you might clear it out, if it still smells a quick carb rebuild from a really good carb guy would probably fix you right up and not really cost that much. Its not like it is built as a current racing motor that wants super high octane. Like my engine block guy told me, don't bother with all this new stuff, high grade synthetic, super clean additive crap, this engine needs the old school treatment ( in my case he meant a simple 30 weight oil with high phosphorus and that's it, no syn, no cleaning agents, no purple power break in, just simple, it works).

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just out of curiosity what gas and or additives are you running? A 600 cfm carb on a 351 should be lean not rich............I ran a 600 on a 289 and it was lean.

 

Exxon 93 and Lead additive per tank since it was done back in the day.   I  don't know if it had hardened seats, but the last owner only put about 1000-2000 miles on it since the 83 rebuild when it was parked in  84.  He would start it from time to time, but never really drove it between 1984 to 1998 except in and out of his garage to move it.  

 

So it then sat hard from 1998 to 2016 when it went into storage and I bought it in early 2016, and got it running a year ago.   The owner had the intake/covers a loose and he told that he would spray WD-40 in the heads and down the chambers every six months or so for almost 20 years.   I  followed the Marvel Mystery Oil on the valves and let it seep in and let it sit for a few days (or something like that, its been two years) and turned it by hand to make sure that it hadn't seized. 

 

So when I  got it back together,  I  drained the oil/etc out and it  took a few  5qt pans to catch everything that came out.   Lots came out!  I've  since  changed the oil  twice, but I am wondering it just  needs to  blow out  all  of the  crud  from 20-30  years  of sitting.

if it sat with the carb on it for 20+ years then I would lean towards the carb being whacky, if it were mine, I'd run it dry and try a couple of gallons of regular and the lead additive and see if the fumes are better. Gas in 73 wasn't the highest of octanes lol and with a lil dirty burn you might clear it out, if it still smells a quick carb rebuild from a really good carb guy would probably fix you right up and not really cost that much. Its not like it is built as a current racing motor that wants super high octane. Like my engine block guy told me, don't bother with all this new stuff, high grade synthetic, super clean additive crap, this engine needs the old school treatment ( in my case he meant a simple 30 weight oil with high phosphorus and that's it, no syn, no cleaning agents, no purple power break in, just simple, it works).

 

Fair enough.   I've  been  wondering about that!   So I re-read the info on the car and the motor came out of a 73 Torino 351C CJ  car.   If my  memory serves me, didn't the  73 Clevelands  take regular fuel?  Hmm.   I appreciate the help and ideas!

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if you were running high compression, cnc heads, a really aggressive cam and had all the bells and whistles with a big carb i'd say 93 all day, if it was just a standard engine with no super engineering give regular a go, worst case it seems a little laggy or you run a bit rough but I doubt it. Fuel smell could be the fact that your fuel is TOO clean and the motor cant burn it all off efficiently.

 

the hoover dam can power 7 states, but if all you need is to mill some flour the river could have done that before.

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Fair enough.   I've  been  wondering about that!   So I re-read the info on the car and the motor came out of a 73 Torino 351C CJ  car.   If my  memory serves me, didn't the  73 Clevelands  take regular fuel?  Hmm.   I appreciate the help and ideas!

 

If that's the case it probably has a 4-bolt block, anyway. If it has the original heads they will be open chamber and probably have the smaller valves. And yes, the '73s used regular gas.

 

As for the compression ratio, you can get a good estimate by using the spreadsheet in this thread

https://www.7173mustangs.com/thread-compression-altitude-calculations?pid=115411#pid115411

 

It will require you to check the compression on it, which isn't a bad idea anyway, on an engine that has been sitting for a while.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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