Jump to content

Brake Discrotor upgrade worth it ?


Recommended Posts

Pads can make a big difference on stock rotors. Slotting and drilling reduces the surface area, but improves cooling if you do a lot of hard braking.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm no expert, but did alot of reading on this subject, and from what I've gathered, the slotting actually decreases stopping power in general type driving. The slots are used to dissipate heat during constant braking E.g. during racing.

 

I also read that slotted disks wear out pads faster because of the way the pad is constantly going over the edges formed by the slots instead of a nice flat surface.

 

I am interested what others have to say about this.

73 ragtop, 1999 Mustang Bright Atlantic Blue Paint, Phoenix Engine 302-335HP,  Edelbrock Carb & Performer manifold; c4 with 2000 stall and shiftkit; 3:55 auburn limited slip differential, Hedman shorties; Car Chemistry Exhaust

 

Classic Air; Tilt Steering Wheel; 1999 Chrysler Sebring bucket Seats ; power windows;

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pads can make a big difference on stock rotors. Slotting and drilling reduces the surface area, but improves cooling if you do a lot of hard braking.

 

Not really that hard braking, its a Daily driver.

For knowing your limit you have to pass it ::thumb::

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A good surface on your rotors and good quality pads will noticeably improve your braking. Any run-out or deviations in the rotor surface reduces braking performance.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But they sure do look cool!!!

 

 

 

22162645_7244_4_B7_B_8215_0142324_B8355.jpg

 

upload images

 

^^    :yeahthat:

73 ragtop, 1999 Mustang Bright Atlantic Blue Paint, Phoenix Engine 302-335HP,  Edelbrock Carb & Performer manifold; c4 with 2000 stall and shiftkit; 3:55 auburn limited slip differential, Hedman shorties; Car Chemistry Exhaust

 

Classic Air; Tilt Steering Wheel; 1999 Chrysler Sebring bucket Seats ; power windows;

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With today's brake compounds the slot are not needed for a street car and I think drilled rotors are just asking for hairline cracks everywhere. A good set of aggressive, yet streetable, pads will help with initial bite and feel. If you want to significantly improve braking get better tires, delay lock-up. I've used Performance Friction and Hawk pads with good results on the street, they will dust more than a "ceramic" pad. Chuck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

good pads and nice flat rotors are great for most, slotted and or drilled are really for more of a racing need to cool better and faster. That being said your driving style kind of dictates what would be better for you. I don't go full throttle on acceleration unless I need to or am having fun, I try to give lots of extra room on braking and only slam them on when something happens in front of me I wasn't expecting so good pads and standard rotors work for me. My grandfather on the other hand accelerates like a drag race, and stops a 3000 lb sedan like its a friggin lotus elise and it weighs as much as a carbon fiber motorcycle. He warps slotted and drilled rotors with great pads in less than a year. When you put them on they will ALL stop you faster, its how long they will stop you well that's the real question based on an honest answer to how you drive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems to me that the better they brake , the faster they wear , and the more dust they make.

73 ragtop, 1999 Mustang Bright Atlantic Blue Paint, Phoenix Engine 302-335HP,  Edelbrock Carb & Performer manifold; c4 with 2000 stall and shiftkit; 3:55 auburn limited slip differential, Hedman shorties; Car Chemistry Exhaust

 

Classic Air; Tilt Steering Wheel; 1999 Chrysler Sebring bucket Seats ; power windows;

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want to improve braking beyond what a simple performance pad and tire upgrade will give you then would would need to go with a larger diameter rotor and a caliper upgrade but this will likely require a wheel size change as well.

73 conv. 460, D0VE large valve heads, Performer RPM manifold, Voodoo 227/233 cam, Holley 950 HP carb, C6 trans, 3.25 trak-loc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I installed mine in 2011. I only put a couple thousand miles a year on the car, not a daily driver but I drive it at least 1 time a week to work and weekends. I probably have 10-15,000 miles on those rotors and pads and they are still like new. But like stated above, I give a lot of room to the car in front of me and brake accordingly. After all, mine are non-powered brakes but I do have disc at all 4 corners.

 

These are very similar to the ones I installed.

 

https://m.ebay.com/itm/FRONT-KIT-2-Platinum-Hart-DRILLED-SLOTTED-Front-Disc-Brake-Rotors-1668/132464763247?fits=Year%3A1971%7CModel%3AMustang&hash=item1ed783e16f:g:JzQAAOSwJH5aVgNU

Kevin
1971 Mach 1

408C Stroker - C4 w/3,000 stall - 8.8" Rear w/3.73's - Disc brakes all way around.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had good luck with Centric metallic pads recently. I also had good luck with Raybestos pro pads in the past. Centric also makes good quality rotors, but I don't believe they make them for our cars.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Robsweden,

 

I agree with Don C. Make sure the rotors are slotted and have a good surface. Street Performance pads for the front and rear will do the trick.

 

Take a look here @ opentracker Racing. They can provide some good information of pads.

 

http://opentrackerracing.com/product/porterfield-r4-s-disc-brake-pads-1968-1973-mustang-cougar/

Thanks,

mustang7173 🇺🇸

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Robsweden,

 

I agree with Don C. Make sure the rotors are slotted and have a good surface. Street Performance pads for the front and rear will do the trick.

 

Take a look here @ opentracker Racing. They can provide some good information of pads.

 

http://opentrackerracing.com/product/porterfield-r4-s-disc-brake-pads-1968-1973-mustang-cougar/

 

Thanks for the info, I still have drums in the back but I leave them for now.

 

Regards Rob

For knowing your limit you have to pass it ::thumb::

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had EBC Yellow Stuff on my 72 for a year. They work really well, don't fade on repeated application & don't seem to produce much dust relatively speaking. I have pulled the car down from nearly 100mph numerous times with them - my local strip has an early turn off otherwise you go to the end & turn around. I always take the early turn which means braking quite hard. I was thinking of a Wilwood kit previously but I'm now happy with what I have got.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have just slotted rotors with performance ceramic pads, and they seem to work well and very little dusting. I believe I got them from CJPP, and they weren't that much more than regular rotors. The braking difference is not very noticeable however, I would also say to get stainless braided lines for the front calipers, that stiffened my pedal up nicely. Next time around I am going to go back to standard rotors as the performance difference just doesn't seem to be there. Good luck!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My two cents. As long as the drum or disc has the ability to slide the tire going to a bigger one does nothing except up the un sprung weight and hurt performance. If you are road racking and need them to last longer yes maybe. The slots are there to let the gas escape that is produced during repeated heavy hard braking. Like when you see the rotors on a race car glowing red. The holes will allow air to flow out I guess but if the turbine webbing in the center of the disc is open to the center I do not really see how that benefits. The holes do lighten the disc so less un sprung weight which is a benefit. You will actually get better gas mileage with drum brakes due to the springs keeping the shoes off the drum. Disc brakes drag all the time even with brakes off. We all know disc fade less in hard multiple braking but how many of us do that?

If I were drag racking I would use drum brakes for sure and the smallest I could get by with to get the weight off.

In NASCAR they jack the pads back from the rotor and the driver does not hit the brakes when qualifying until time to come in. You will always hear the spotter tell them to pump the brakes when they come in to push the pads back out. That can give him a few tenths better lap time due to brake pads not dragging.

One of the better choices to improve your discs is to send them to have cryogenic treatment. Will improve stopping, fade and wear. All racers use it that want to win.

David

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...