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Fabrice's 429CJ 71 project


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@73pony, I don't know if its art, but I know for sure its freakin lots of work if you want something nice out of a 50 year old sheetmetal!

 

Not in the mood to do some body work,

 

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Started the day by trying another candy I bought for the intake. As I will never use a carburator again, I know from my cleveland with a similar hoffy intake that a little open spacer does very good with an EFI.

 

protection.jpg

Blinded by so much bling bling I was in the mood again :) So went back to the deck lid and injected the color inside on the now dry epoxy. Once the paint was dry, injected the wax. This german wax comes with a very handy long thin tube with a nozzle with 4 holes, it literaly goes everywhere. All places treated on my 73 never ever showed rust again after this treatment.

Meanwhile redid the corner as I wasn't pleased with a curve after tested with the extension.

 

finesanding.jpg

And then it was once more the water game. It was sunny and light was ideal to spot every detail on the surface.

The surface was now as smooth and silky as a lady's bottom!

 

water_surface.jpg

May be hard to see on the top picts, but there were 2 little cavities I could see while moving bits. So continued water sanding grid 600 in the regions. Water and sun do not lie. A few moments later, white round spots left overs confirmed the flaws.

 

reprimer.jpg

On the 4 or 5 details I've fixed like this, one was just too deep, tho, we speak may 0.05 mm here. But I would not like see anything on the final paint, so primed again. The inside is paint ready. Next week, i'll water sand it again, its 1/2 hour work.

 

extensions.jpg

The deck lid now practically ready for paint, the next logical candidates were the extensions that i've used while busy checking the alignments on the deck lid. They were out of the car waiting in their box and they went first in a detergent bath. Got a first clue on the car history. Once cleaned up in the inside, one was green inside while the other greyish had some green, but more of an overspray.

Brought on both a layer of that nasty paint remover and let it work for 15 minutes...

 

extensions2.jpg

I was able to remove a bunch of the paint on the first pass, so continued focus on that one while the other received a second layer.

 

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At some point got one totally paint free, and I wish there was only one extension! One down, one to go!

 

extensionsclean.jpg

Sun went meanwhile dark red but continued till I would get that thing totally cleared.

 

Unlike the other, this one was having some bondo and once under a good light, it's clear there is a story behind. As I've seen some bondo on the rusty tailpanel near the light, its clear the car got a kiss at some point. I'll probably know more once I'll replace the floor and tailpanel...

 

Another productive weekend passed. Glad that deck lid is done.

To be continued...

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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You been busy again! Did you inject the color inside using the tube with nozzle as well? Or did you just spray as far as you could?

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You been busy again! Did you inject the color inside using the tube with nozzle as well? Or did you just spray as far as you could?

 

I need be busy again and again if I ever want to see this car put back together...

 

The wax that is important was sprayed with the nozzle.

For the color base coat I've borrowed a spray I have from my 73. The 71 will get a slightly different dark green. As the epoxy primer I've poured inside is yellowish/orange, I wanted to spray as far as I could inside. The overspray with the right color will later on correct the color and blend with this layer. The paint on itself as no protection value, its purely for my eyes. As once back on the car, unless you'd twist your neck to look up, nobody would ever see it. Totally overkill :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Weekend again!

Today, weather was a record. Never ever was the temperature that high for this time of the year over here: 26c.

 

menu-du-jour.jpg

As its expected that all returns to normal (cold) within 3 or 4 days, I've decided go "cook" the hood today, as it's not the kind of work you want to do when it's cold.

Thought about all kinds of constructions to rock it, so the liquid goes everywhere and remembered our old picknic table, in a not brilliant state, it could not get worse and turned out to be the perfect help.

So started by removing the hood and label/pack every parts/bolts for later..

 

Bit of bad luck, one bolt of the latch "bar/retainer" broke. No time to loose on that one for now. Todo++.

 

taping.jpg

First had to degrease a lot. Tape doesn't stick on grease. Partly because I've oiled in the past so it would not rust further and also because beneath the ram-air plenum was a bunch of greasy dirt had accumulated over the years.. As it's a ram air hood, the scoops leave massive holes that need be closed, so mixed duct tape and plastic to ensure all would be water tight. First on the top, then same story repeated on the inside. So many big holes to close, it turned out it was actually much more efficient and less leak prone to keep it on that side.

 

So filled it with 4 liters of cleaning vinegar, a big glass of concentrated rust dissover, few liter of water and the shaking/rocking started. The table turned out be super handy, not to high or too low. Up down, left , right, front back... repeat. repeat.

After a while, every muscles in me started complain...

 

scoops-paintremove.jpg

In between sessions, handled the scoops with paint remover, and let the chemicals do the job for me. Somehow the top coats reacted on only one. So removed the now soft top coat with a scrapper, and reaplied a second time. 2 hours or so later, the old paint was finally reacting everywhere. I know now thx to this test, that I will sand a bit the top coat on the top side of the hood first before applying the chemicals. The inside, just like the deck lid, was painted like a pig. They simply open the hood and sprayed black. No sanding, no primer, no masking. On multiple places the original Ivy green paint is visible where parts were removed. Its big strange, as for such an expensive "art work" at the time, you'd expect the paint job was done with great care. But no, the scoops were on when they sprayed and underneath they are bare zamac. Probably NOS replaced when this paint job was done.

The good news is that I should not have lots of work to remove the paint on the inside later on.

 

notenuffmess.jpg

Because there wasn't enough mess already, i've also cleaned up the plenum that was really dirty, full of greasy dirt. It doesn't look much, but it took lots of efforts to get it clean.

 

cooking.jpg

On top, when I started, down left, after 1 hour, the rust started get loose and there was already lots of deposits accumulating. The solution was still clear.

Down right, a pict taken just 1/2 hour ago, the fluid has been busy more than 8 hours, and the solution is now saturated.

 

I've just shaken/rocked it a few times again and leaved it to cook for the night.

 

Pretty sure I will not have any problems to fall asleep tonite. :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Fabrice, great to see a Master Chef at work once again! Vinnie, are you paying attention?

Wish shipping expenses weren’t so insane. The hood on my red 71 Mach1 is in such bad shape it needs to be cooked by a professional such as yourself for at least a couple of weeks. It needs a lot of special sauces!! [emoji3]

Unseasonably warm weather seems to be going on everywhere. As I told you earlier I was headed to New Orleans to take some antiques to my daughter that she had found in SC. Ended up going to a vintage plane and air show put on by the WW II Museum and it was so hot we finally had to leave. (Is it really October)?

Getting to be an old monkey Fabrice, can’t take the heat like I used to!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Steve

 

No Officer...I really don't know how fast I was going, my speedometer stopped at 140!

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I could smell your cooking all the way overhere in amsterdam!

 

And most certainly am I paying attention but I’m not ready yet as I couldn’t find my picnic table in my garage ;-) also I have not settled on the method I wanna use. I’m still leaning towards a full dip but that could require between 150-250 litres of vinegar (or watered down rustyco). But also the inside had been sprayed and I may have to sand that first, somehow...

 

Anyway, with only 4 litres, are you sure every bit of inside surface is now cleaned of rust?

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Totally rusty (me and my muscles) from yesterday

As the fluid stayed the whole night and morning more on the front,

started today with a liquid refresh, a final moving session and let it work +-2 hours on the back while I took a breakfast and prep for another messy dirty day...

 

breakfast.jpg

The bright orange rust was gone! Yeah!

On the left, its the liquid over staturated that drips deep orange colored saturated juice, on the left, from one of the holes of the bracket, rust is gone too, the black are deposits.

 

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After breakfast, time for "purée de rust". Everywhere underneath the tape there was a thick layer of dissolved muddy rust and tons of rust debris.

 

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Time to make even more mess and use high presssure water inside with kicken soap to balance the ph. Man, the sh...t that came out of it. On the right, the rag I used on the table to prevent dents on the front side and ease the manip. Cleaned it up each pressure session, and when it was full, lifted the hood to empty it. Each time a massive amount of debris came out.

 

dryandextra.jpg

Eventually, the yellow brownish water that kept coming out turned clear and when there was no more debris to be found on the rag. Next step was the drying session to prevent flash rust.

First with air, then with heat gun. Once dry, injected/sprayed pure rustico from the top. Let it rest 15, and heat gunned dry.

 

rust.jpg

Somehow the pict are rose/orange colored, as I've tried make them in full sun, but the rust inside is gone. On the left, the rust left over is on top, it was under the tape, and did not get or very little exposure to the liquid, on the right, somehow burned image, due to high contrast, thats the inside at the bracket hole. the pink is an optic issue, it's grey metal color.

 

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Once all was dry, started work on the outside, exposing the rust holes that I will be handling next week.

On this pict, you can see the inside at the latch with more real colours, there too, no more rust.

 

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In between, it was time for a "scoop pudding", on top, the paint remover that stayed 24 hours applied. With zero force, the paint was peeling off the scoops.

 

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I think it took 20 minutes to get them both bare shiny. I've sanded not to be bling bling, but to provide a good base for the soon to be sprayed epoxy primer.

 

 

@Vinnie

4 liter + more than 1/2 the rustico concentrate bottle is more than agressive enough and done it twice. It could be done more but I wasn't planning to get up at nite to change fluid in the dark :)

Keep in mind, filling the hood is one, but then lifting/rocking it to get a wave inside that cleans up is heavy (at least for a small guy like me). I was having like 10 liters of fluid inside, it was alreally hard on my muscles, the hood is after all not the lightest.

A full dip would surely be better, but you still need to rince it, and trust me, that's really messy.

 

Found out (too late grrr) what I should have done, may I derust another one one day...

I should have placed the hood in huge plastic bags. Like they use for beds. tape them tight, heat gunned the plastic to fit the hood tight and only leave one hole at the latch. Say a mix of what I did and your full dip plan. I regretted not have this idea before... I would then have been able to fill it up to the neck...

Ah well, from what I saw, the most important, the side under the top of the hood is rust free, and only the most top part of the inside where I was filling could have used bit more. I need to weld there, so depending on what I will cut (and see inside), I may rebath it on that part after welding (using heat gunned plastic), but as of now, from what i saw, I don't think I will need to do it. Once protected (injection of epoxy and wax), rust will take many years before come back.

 

[and I may have to sand that first, somehow...]

You can forget it. No way to access anything. The spray they did, will wash off with the solution as it was likely sprayed on rust and is only near of big holes where the gun nozzle could go.

 

All with all, it was a very messy weekend and spend last 2 hours cleaning up everything, but glad its done now.

I will probably have to build some kind of platform for it, to move it in and out of the garage safely and without too much efforts, as placing it back in the garage alone was not that easy...

 

My "to be primed & painted box" has grown a lot in past weeks. So unless its raining or too cold, I might let the paint gun speak next weekend unless I return to the 73 for a change...

 

To be continued

 

@secluff

[Wish shipping expenses weren’t so insane.]

Yeah, well I have found a floor pan in Belgium, at least 800 euros cheaper than via regular USA shops, but even so 60 or 100 euros were added to let it come here. Mine is totally gone, nothing to be saved. They also import hoods, but all with all, it still would be here for 700/750 dollars. Its still lots of money vs a messy weekend. Once rust is gone, you still need to prime and paint, new or old. Plus the original hood, is made of 1mm thick metal, not the repops I saw.

 

[The hood on my red 71 Mach1 is in such bad shape it needs to be cooked]

Well, I bet at least 50% of the 7173 hoods have same prob. As its either considered too expensive for a repro or too messy to "cook". Most will simply close it and forget about it :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Found out (too late grrr) what I should have done, may I derust another one one day...

I should have placed the hood in huge plastic bags. Like they use for beds. tape them tight, heat gunned the plastic to fit the hood tight and only leave one hole at the latch. Say a mix of what I did and your full dip plan. I regretted not have this idea before... I would then have been able to fill it up to the neck...

Ah well, from what I saw, the most important, the side under the top of the hood is rust free, and only the most top part of the inside where I was filling could have used bit more. I need to weld there, so depending on what I will cut (and see inside), I may rebath it on that part after welding (using heat gunned plastic), but as of now, from what i saw, I don't think I will need to do it. Once protected (injection of epoxy and wax), rust will take many years before come back.

 

You did well! Looks like hard work for sure. The idea of a huge plastic bag is interesting but a quick search for them only got me wraps for pallet cargo which is a bit too small and too big at the same time... What about kling wrap? (dutch: huishoud folie)

 

The back of the top sheet metal is most important and definitely doable like you did. I'm still trying to think of ways to also treat the back/inside of the inner sheet of my hood. However, cleaning it in a dip of cheap stuff could be done but I'm starting to doubt if there is any way of getting primer everywhere. Maybe I shouldn't worry about the inner sheet to much and get it over with...

 

Need to buy a pump first now coz I can't let water run everywhere :-/ Saving for the  engine rebuild is taking long this way grrrrrr

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Weekend!

Temperature went down a lot past week, garden full of brown leaves.

but today was dry and in the sun not that cold. A typical autumn shiny day.

 

newcomers.jpg

Received my floor pan and a replacement for my brake booster. As both are beyond repair, I needed them new.

Very happy to have the floor pan at an almost US price, thanks to a guy in Belgium importing sheet metal and parts in large quantities per container.

So after a short inspection of these goodies, I got to work and started with the hood welding...

 

cutand-Patch.jpg

The rust did her eating work near the latch lock area, lots of small holes where at spot welds.

Underneath the regular metal, there is a second much stronger piece of metal.

So started by drilling the spotwelds out, better said, what was left of them and defined a larger region that I could cut and redo without creating a too chalenging repair regarding metal forming...

 

Took another pizza box (I save these now:) ) and replicated the shape onto a new piece of metal. To mimic the spotwelds, I've drilled holes before start give the wanted shape. It doesn't look complex, but there are angles at play and I was happy to have the old piece to guide me to be as near as possible.

I didn't do too bad I think, as all went in place without much hamerring.

 

unfinished.jpg

Bits unlucky, while busy my torch nozzle started to slow down the wire feed, and had to stop many times to fix the same issue.

I was mad at me for not having replacements in house. And of course all the pro shops where i can buy these are closed tomorrow grrr...

The welding on itself, was going slow because of that and the difference in metal thickness that did not help much. It was on some places, just like on the deck lid very hard to not go thru, which I did in several cases. For one inch all goes ok and the next bath, poof you go thru.

 

The sun went down early and there was not enough light to see, I'll have to finish this patch tomorrow.

I've located 3 places where a patch is required and will need to spot weld at the very end. The patches should be more easy comparied to this one, as they have no structural function unlike this one that really needs to be strong.

I hope I'll be able to do this tomorrow as I really want to inject protection in there and start prime before temp is too low...

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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wontmove.jpg

Back on the hood, lost 2 hours on that broken lock latch bolt.. Got some equivalent of w40 penetrating oil whole week on it, heat, hammering, pliers from the inside, welded bolts, nuts and as last resort went to drilling and finally got the hole free again. Gotcha you [insert bad word] thing!

Seriously, do not use non-Ford bolts unless they are of good/similar quality and use grease no matter what on these bolts, there is serious water condensing issue in that area and when its stuck, man its really stuck..

Will need to redo the threads this week..

 

welding-grinding.jpg

Rest of the afternoon was about making patches, grinding, welding, grinding, extra weld points here and there....

Done? Nope, that would be nice, but discovered same prob on the other side of the latch after a good brush wheel pass. And I still have to patch on the other side where the hood molding rests on the right side... Then a final grinding with a new disc which I also forgot to buy last week too.

In short: do protect your hoods in the inside! Don't let them get to that point! Its a real pita to fix as that thing isn't a small item that you can move around just like that.

 

All with all, done not half what I was planning to do... grrr

 

To be continued

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Usually happy when its mustang time, but was so busy at work this week, ordered what I needed way too late and the slim chance of receiving my shopping list this morning disappeared. (no weld torche nozzle, grinding discs, weld zinc etc... checkmate!)

Not to mention it was cold and rainy..

 

cut.jpg

But hey its weekend, no way I'm gonna let some precious mustang time go away doing zip, I need do at least something! So as I got this nice surprise to discover more rust holes on the other side of the latch. I've let my cutting tool speak, even Mr Chisel helped as well.

There was this thread this week about rotary tools and Dremel being a toy. Well, for the 2 small cuts I've used the toy kuz the big bad boy I use normally would have added 1 inch of extra welding fun on by being too big. Toy or not, it did the job, tho took two tiny discs to get it done. Looking at strong and small alternatives atm... air or electric. Tips welcome.

 

pathandbolt.jpg

Lost 2 hours last weekend to remove the broken bolt, so redid the thread as M8 metric and used a hood lock bolt from my long gone T-bird 91 that were metrics too. Stays Ford and I know its made for the job. Meanwhile the pizzabox was back to take a print of the hole and helped cut my patch out of a 1mm plate.

 

shape.jpg

The patch at this location turned out to be more tricky to make than it looked. Some twist in the shape, tiny fold of few degrees, a good looking cut for the bolt location, prep the holes to mimic spot welds, took longer than expected to get the patch "flush". (not overlapping or going under, with just a tiny space in between)

 

Then it was really cold, so called it a day. Glad I did that one today after all.

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Blocked by the lack of welding supplies, went looking at the other known misery place on the front driver side of the hood.

 

misery.jpg

Looking bits better once blank, I knew some massage needed be done. The lip at the end displaying 2 long holes.

Just like the deck lid, this ancient paint job done by I bet the same pig had massive lack of preparation, painted over original paint with zero sanding somewhere and primed a few inches further. On this corner of the hood, this brave man, fixed a dent and applied Bondo on bare metal and used that as primer. Knowing now the care used for the entire car paint, its clear why there are bubbles under the black paint. Unfortunately at this location, the water found its way thru the porous Bondo and did its damage.

 

filingdown.jpg

Mad to not be able to weld, looking at these holes made my blood boil! :)

So I've drilled my torch head with the smallest bit I had and managed to free the guide enough to fix the prob causing my wire to get either too slow or stuck. Big smile on my face, I was back in business and welded the corner. I did not have any abrasive discs in house, but got a brand new metal file!

In fact, In the end, as the challenge here is to get the lip with new metal aligned to the rest, working with it was actually much better! More a sculpture thingy than the usual grinding.

 

nogrinddisc.jpg

Took some elbow oil to file everything. But eventually using only hand tools, managed to get that corner done!

I should have my abrasive disks by tomorrow, so one light pass should be enough to prep the metal.

With a layer of epoxy + filler primer, it should be just fine.

 

I'll finish the welding of my patch on the other side next week and I should finally be able to begin to make that hood look better vs make it more ugly every time I touch it! :)

Amazing the time that goes into these things!

 

To be continued...

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Using a file to create a 100% cube... First task in precision engineering tech. school. I remember it well :-)

 

Your hood is starting to come along nicely, glad you managed to fix your welder!

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A one pict post for once...

 

smelly.jpg

Welded the patch inside, injected some epoxy/rust converter and applied a thick layer of paint remover that will work while I'm sleeping.

 

With both the drying rust eater/epoxy inside and the paint remover on the outside being busy doing their things, the air in the garage became of the kind I started feel very funky.

This stuff is so friendly I could see some smoky vapours on the surface. So decided it might be wise to go do something somewhere else :)

 

 

@Vinnie

Indeed, the file did just fine. Everything can be done by hand, glad it was just the hood corner and not a cube tho :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Day started a bit disappointed by what the paint remover left me with... no peeled off paint :(

Just like the deck lid, looked like the paint used long ago on top did not let the chemicals go thru as I hoped.

 

notasexpected.jpg

Tho, overall, the paint was very soft. So scrapped all I could roughly and moved the hood outside and placed it flat to work better. (easy to say, bit less in practice)

Then applied a new layer of remover and as observed with the decklid, a simple metal handbrush while still wet was working fine. The paint was rolling itself and was relatively easy to be removed.

 

startedlookok.jpg

The minutes became hours, but at some point I was able to get the entire underside of the hood paint free and see the bare metal.

Found some light rust here and there too, but no bad news this time. There will be no more welding required on this side! Yeah!

 

eventually.jpg

Eventually got a nice clean surface and started work on the details. Small bites of light rust here and there, probably caused at some point in time by small dents that went thru the paint.

 

rustico.jpg

Pretty happy with the results so far, It went on to next step, which was to apply rust dissolver on the entire surface. Did some extra brushing on the rust spots, helping the liquid as much as possible to penetrate. The one I use treats the rust and leaves a phosphate like layer behind once dry. The kind I need, as it was too late and too cold to start spray something on the blank metal.

 

protected.jpg

Back into the garage with bright light, all brown spots and regions where gone. Still wet, all was greyish. It will probably be yellowish by tomorrow.

Weather is expected to be dry and relativly soft coming days, so this layer should be enough to protect it till next weekend.

Next is to finish the other side, and begin to spray the epoxy primer. For that I'll have to magically transform a corner of my overfilled garage into some cabine. Even if soft for the time of the year, its way too cold for epoxy.

 

If you pay for gym, let me tell you, save your money and get yourself a rusty hood to restore! Discovered again this weekend new muscles I didn't know I even had :)

 

To be continued...

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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menu-du-jour.jpg

I hope you are keeping the hood image!

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Why? You want to replicate it? :)

 

If you mean a few picts of it, yes I did. If you mean keep it on the hood, mmm, I'm gonna have to disappoint you. This 80's piece of art will peel off next weekend! I promise I will sand it with respect!

 

Tho, even if its not my taste, this handmade graphic made this car unique. Back in late 80's in Paris, I recall people knew the car because of it. Even if I'm not planning to have something similar again. I'm starting to think about what I would like on the car in the end. I'd like something personal, in the era style, prolly highly inspired by the original deco, but would like to do something else than the classic hockey stick/hood treatment. I would like this car to have that little something that makes it unique just like this thing did. Don't know what yet tho :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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Why? You want to replicate it? :)

 

If you mean a few picts of it, yes I did. If you mean keep it on the hood, mmm, I'm gonna have to disappoint you. This 80's piece of art will peel off next weekend! I promise I will sand it with respect!

 

Tho, even if its not my taste, this handmade graphic made this car unique. Back in late 80's in Paris, I recall people knew the car because of it. Even if I'm not planning to have something similar again. I'm starting to think about what I would like on the car in the end. I'd like something personal, in the era style, prolly highly inspired by the original deco, but would like to do something else than the classic hockey stick/hood treatment. I would like this car to have that little something that makes it unique just like this thing did. Don't know what yet tho :)

 

 

Go to the Sacre Coeur hill in Paris and I am sure some of those artist will love to paint a caricature in that hood.

lollerz rofl rofl

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

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Today was "7173HoodDay" in the Netherlands!

250km south west of me, @Vinnie started "cook" his flat hood. From some of his messages, I know he was having serious water fun :)

and on my side I finally came to the point where mine was about to start to look better than before!

 

Weather was really miserable today, so first I needed to magically transform my garage in a spray booth somehow.

 

hinges.jpg

In between moving boxes and tons of stuffs, protecting... placed the hinges under a layer of paint remover for later.

 

cabine.jpg

Once enough space was finally created and all I could protect protected, it was time to spray the inner side with epoxy primer after a good final cleaning session. I have more to do on the other side, but as the weather is really wet and expected to stay like this for a few days, I really wanted to have that side protected no matter what.

 

primer.jpg

Probably the most satisfying moment on any part you restore: the moment you have cleaned up the spray gun, tools back to their places. Light a cig and watch the clean surface slowly drying, totally aware of what it takes to get to that point...

 

 

@NOT A T5

No way! This is something a mustang lover must do once in his lifetime alone. Experience the pain!

A bit like these initiation rituals seen in some tribes. :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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bondo.jpg

As the plan was to filler prime today started by quickly applying bits of bondo to have a nicer finish where i've welded,. Nobody looks there, but after so much work, I'm not gonna do difficult for a few minutes of sanding.

 

hinges.jpg

While the bondo was hardening went back to the hinges, They stayed the night in the paint remover. Turns out they were having 2 layers of paint. one dark blue, one Ford blue. I'll clean them further later on. Still not sure what I'm gonna do with these. may be sandblast them and have them coated or let them plated with white chrome as my 73.

 

goodbye.jpg

Turned the hood to the art side and it was time to say goodbye to this 80's piece of art.

 

layers.jpg

I thought I'd be quickly done with the paint removal.... I was so wrong!

 

How many layers of paint/coating can you have on a 45 year old hood?

well you can have a LOT.

 

From what I saw, there is first a layer of red primer from Ford, a primer, then the original green and in the middle the grey. then the top clear coat. Then for some reason, there is on the entire left side primer and again green and grey and top coat, and then there is the "herts" layer, black and gold, and a thick top coat and then there is the art work, with primer first, the art paint and likely a very thick layer of clear coat.

 

Simply too much "and thens" to be dissolved in one go. reapplied 2 times and scrapped tons.

The art layer, the black, most green and gold are gone.

 

As I can't make dust in the garage to sand these layers or go outside because its raining and can't use heat that could burn the applied epoxy.

Applied another thick layer and called it a day.

 

Looks like priming is for next weekend. ..

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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