Jump to content

Slowest resto ever - Project AmsterFoose / Current subject: Cowl.


Recommended Posts

Your hood looks brand new. It's even smooth inside. I think that aside the rust removal, the fact that the treatment removes all the paint for you makes it already worth it. Mine had layers and layers of different types of paint, some resistant to paint removers... Had to use lots of bad words before get to the bare metal!

 

I know, it saves a hell of a lot of time and it's OK for many decades to come. I'm more convinced than ever that I want my whole car to be dipped now. It's the only way to get a 100% rust free body and it comes back wearing a base coat ready to start building the car again. I'm very happy with the way this experiment went :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting... did the dipping process remove the factory applied deadener that separates the top and bottom of the hood? I debated sending my hood in when I did my restoration, but i did not want to chance losing the factory application as noted. There is no way to reinstall back to factory after the fact... looks good though.

"Yes dear", has kept me in the hobby a long time...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m not sure what you mean by deadener, a piece of fabric or glue or something sprayed on? I think either way the answer is: it’s gone. The hood appears to have been separated before coz the spot welds at the front have been drilled out. All the glue and anything sprayed on is gone and there is no fabric left except for a few small bits that came out when I cleaned it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, forwards is the idea, just very slow. Next up is removing stuff from the back and replacing my taillight panel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The deadener I believe 7173 is referring to is the sprayed in foam/adhesive that is applied to the under hood panel prior to it being bonded to the top hood panel. This is done to keep the panels separated and avoid metal on metal contact and the rattling sound from that. If this bonding material is gone, you will know it driving down the road and the hood top skin will flex up and down and you will probably hear some metal rattling sounds when you close it. You may need to look into this a little deeper and find out from your dipper if his process removes that (I would think so) and if there is a way to reapply some solution for it being gone.

BKDunha

72 Mach 1 H-Code (Concourse driven restoration)

67 S-Code Factory GT with 4-Spd

68 Mercury Cyclone (Pro-Street project)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The deadener I believe  7173 is referring to is the sprayed in foam/adhesive that is applied to the under hood panel prior to it being bonded to the top hood panel.  This is done to keep the panels separated and avoid metal on metal contact and the rattling sound from that.  If this bonding material is gone, you will know it driving down the road and the hood top skin will flex up and down and you will probably hear some metal rattling sounds when you close it.  You may need to look into this a little deeper and find out from your dipper if his process removes that (I would think so) and if there is a way to reapply some solution for it being gone.

 

For the body, are there many "isolation spots" done this way?

On the hood from what I saw, I don't think there would be much efforts involved to re-isolate it, easy access too. I guess same could apply for doors and deck lid.

but for the body, I have no idea.

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can buy a expanding foam from a builders merchant. You would need to purchase a longer piece of tubing to get right into the end. Its not a motor industry solution but worth consideration. Theres also a Canadian breathable expanding foam used to insulate roof spaces but that will be tougher to get hold of. If you do use the expanding foam be careful as it expands massively.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FIX-FILL-EXPANDING-FOAM-FILLER-500ml-EVERBUILD-QUICK-SETTING-FILLS-GAPS-NEW/181297396687?epid=10011036322&hash=item2a362abbcf:g:ZHkAAMXQVERSzElS:rk:10:pf:0

Steve

1971 Grande

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can buy a expanding foam from a builders merchant. You would need to purchase a longer piece of tubing to get right into the end. Its not a motor industry solution but worth consideration. Theres also a Canadian breathable expanding foam used to insulate roof spaces but that will be tougher to get hold of. If you do use the expanding foam be careful as it expands massively.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FIX-FILL-EXPANDING-FOAM-FILLER-500ml-EVERBUILD-QUICK-SETTING-FILLS-GAPS-NEW/181297396687?epid=10011036322&hash=item2a362abbcf:g:ZHkAAMXQVERSzElS:rk:10:pf:0

 

Isn't that Poly URethane foam (PUR)? It isolates, is real sticky and becomes solid in little time?

 

I only found black adhesive patches of about an inch in diameter. I removed the ones I could get to before I started my vinegar adventure because there was rust underneath. The ones I removed shouldn't be too hard to replace. That said, I think the first of the three baths in this dipping process also dissolves those adhesive patches.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can buy a expanding foam from a builders merchant. You would need to purchase a longer piece of tubing to get right into the end. Its not a motor industry solution but worth consideration. Theres also a Canadian breathable expanding foam used to insulate roof spaces but that will be tougher to get hold of. If you do use the expanding foam be careful as it expands massively.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FIX-FILL-EXPANDING-FOAM-FILLER-500ml-EVERBUILD-QUICK-SETTING-FILLS-GAPS-NEW/181297396687?epid=10011036322&hash=item2a362abbcf:g:ZHkAAMXQVERSzElS:rk:10:pf:0

 

Isn't that Poly URethane foam (PUR)? It isolates, is real sticky and becomes solid in little time?

 

I only found black adhesive patches of about an inch in diameter. I removed the ones I could get to before I started my vinegar adventure because there was rust underneath. The ones I removed shouldn't be too hard to replace. That said, I think the first of the three baths in this dipping process also dissolves those adhesive patches.

 

Yes Vinnie it comes out the can sticky and expands massively and sets hard. Once hard it can be cut with a knife to remove any excess

Steve

1971 Grande

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Well my Mustang is doing this topic proud by not allowing me to unscrew the rear bumper...

 

Start:

 

1adb30ad1c3eec31be042d3960c4420d.jpg

 

Removing the lights was fun coz the rubber is glued to the rusty metal...

 

cb9c3fd6dd3c95aca63c128e15638c8b.jpg

 

240246d3c0628ca2559c46dd8d426c7d.jpg

 

But when removing the bumper, the very last screw became a pita. The nut is kept from spinning by a rectangular plate that it’s stuck into. That plate broke though and the nut popped loose. Also the nut is totally stuck on the screw. I thought I’d try to use my angle grinder to cut it only to find out that my angle grinder which I have only used once about 6 years ago is completely dead. Yay! Another excuse to buy a new tool.

 

058c0b87d0be3ce241cecbb6ae1551e9.jpg

 

So I gave up for now and get me a new grinder. Oh and a big 11/16 wrench. That will fit the nut too. In my collection of non metric tools it’s one of the few missing ones...

 

5c62ce74865f1fb177fef84eed62ae2e.jpg

 

Too be continued...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The beauty of having SAE and metric is sometimes a socket or wrench from the other set can get a grip on hardware that is slightly rounded or even rusted. Might need a hammer...

 

Any chance your old grinder has a reset switch it circuit breaker? I have a cutoff tool that quit the first time and it had the reset button hidden under the cord on the back end, really kind of hard to see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A nut splitter can be very handy, especially when there's not much room to get a grinder to it.

https://www.amazon.com/Steelgrip-2265015-Nut-Splitter-Piece/dp/B003MQIVZA/ref=sr_1_4?crid=3JCQH7L2LY0GL&keywords=nut+splitter+tool&qid=1552858474&s=hi&sprefix=nut+splitt%2Cgarden%2C720&sr=1-4

 

I wouldn't throw your angle grinder away. I assume it's electric. I would guess it's got a brush stuck and not contacting the commutator. Most electric tools have access for removing the brushes without having to dismantle it.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mmh, I’d have to have another look but I don’t think there is a reset anything. Thanks for the idea though!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh! Missed the nut splitter idea while I was replying, great idea and looks real easy. And I have the feeling I’ll be getting quite some milage out of it while disassembling ;-)

That’s gonna be interesting! Thanks Don!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd let penetrating oil do the talking for a while. The nut isn't is a nut, its a massive retainer, I don't think it would break as a regular nut would, but I think if you use a similar tool just to prevent it turns a full rotation while you turn in the inside, You could also try to hammer a flat screwdriver in between this retainer plate and the bracket.

As it's not a problem to damage the tail panel as you're going to replace it, you could also cut the sheetmetal from the inside where the bracket bolt is.

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I left it dripping with penetrating oil for one last attempt. You are right about it not being a regular nut. It's a square nut squeezed in a retainer plate. That plate broke though so the nut is now loose from the plate but totally stuck on the bolt. I'll think about cutting up the panel, that could very well be a viable option, too. Thanks! :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I’m on my way to victory:

 

9c7b3517059bc798fc9f67e4697f0776.jpg

 

The bumper is off. Only because I found out the brackets are not stuck to the bumper. I expected them to be welded on, thinking the bolts were only there to mount the bumper guards. Why make holes in the bumper if you do not have the guards eh...

 

So I removed the bolts holding the bumper on the bracket. Now it is just the bracket left:

 

4f0ac50f096dc805de67da6e0ed214f5.jpg

 

This is how these retainer plates fail, the other bolt appears to have been removed by a previous owner:

 

3f833ca7910e178447b25b0dcac0faad.jpg

 

So now I’m curious: if you do not have bumper guards, do you see uglyness sticking out?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

This weekend I got the rear deconstructed. The bumper is off and also the rear valance. All the rusted bolts, nuts and bumper brackets are enjoying a vinegar bath:

 

b24d76be25b0d8890449e3298965a41a.jpg

 

Then I did a little Foosin’ around:

 

a4093444bc0d69f989bc34ac22558768.jpg

 

I reckon this would look great :-)

 

Couple of questions I still have to figure out

 

1) That bracket behind the filler neck, is that attached to the trunk floor or just to the tail light panel?

 

2) Below picture is the inside of the trunk drop off, outer skin just under the side marker. It’s got a thick layer of crap on it. I’d think that it is plaster but there might be original paint (bronze) on it?

 

ffb3b2b3529b61db331d940b725e643c.jpg

 

Next up is removing the trim etc. and then looking for spotwelds, oh the joy! :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've been busy I see :)

 

1/ If you mean the bracket that holds the latch lock, I think I remember its welded top and bottom on the tail panel.

Will look for you.

2/ I think the only bronze coloured thing you'll find there is rust.

 

The bumper placed this way, would be similar as on 71 & 72. Indeed nicer than on 73 models.

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Wow, where did that weekend go? All I managed to do (in a few hours that I had) was remove the trim which was super easy and look at the panel:

 

6ed4ce0492a5687d1b76157fb84bdf49.jpg

 

I studied the edges of the tail light panel and discovered that it is put in crooked. Looking at the edge on the back of the panel, on one side it’s flush with the trunk floor:

 

7185dd640d79442a08169029eb65abf9.jpg

 

On the other side it’s 8mm (1/3”) off:

 

511439f19c1dd0dbab8f4f36b97efea9.jpg

 

Also it’s not horizontally centered, it is too far to the drivers side. And it looks to be the original panel...

 

Is this how our cars were put together?

 

I never noticed this but it makes me wonder about welding a new one in place....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These two reinforcements are weird things in the first place. They were I think welded in a hurry. Not really sure what they could even mean during a rear kiss, they'd prolly help to make more damage than prevent it as they are welded on top of the frame U's.

Once you'll have the metal free of all the "protection", you'll know for sure if there was indeed a construction mistake or if it's some hidden surprise instead.

 

[Wow, where did that weekend go?]

thats a good question, was asking myself the exact same thing :)

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

In true form I did very little again, wouldn’t want things to go to fast right.

 

I only had a few hours this weekend which I used to remove paint and seam sealer in suspicious places:

 

76d47637667d72bc57d074e745b732fc.jpg

 

Hardly any serious rust on top.

 

Different story below:

 

8176d5b4bddf5ff6b150143dd6d9b5a6.jpg

 

When replacing the tail light panel I’m also going to replace the lower trunk drop off, inside and outside, only LH side as the other side seems to be OK.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[wouldn’t want things to go to fast right.]

Learned over the years that no matter how hard you try, doing it right rarely goes fast.

 

Did you find anything (ancient repairs) on the top explaining the faulty curve with the deck lid side that you posted about last week?

73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did you find anything (ancient repairs) on the top explaining the faulty curve with the deck lid side that you posted about last week?

 

 

That was one of the things I looked for, couldn’t find anything concrete. It looks like the “ridge” on top of the quarter is a liiittle bit flatter than it should which can push the inside inwards a bit. I don’t see anything indicating the quarter is not original but I find it hard to believe it’s been like this from the factory...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Vinnie changed the title to Slowest resto ever - Project AmsterFoose / Current subject: Cowl.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...