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Fuel line routing underhood


RC92234
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This was a very early "gotta fix that" thing, but now that I've pulled the p/s pump and sent off for rebuild, it's easier to see the fuel line where the metal line from the tank emerges underhood to transition to a rubber hose leading to the fuel pump is wrong.  Of course, can't see it now, but it was completely wrapped around the p/s pump hoses.

 

Can't be right to also loop the stabilizer bar and hang down an extra 3"-4"...

 

It appears to me to be about a foot too long, but, I'm not sure where and how the rubber hose attached to the metal line from the gas tank routes to the fuel pump intake.

 

 

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Another view:

 

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WTF!!! Either somebody did not have a knife or other cutter, or they were too damn lazy to do it right.

On mine, I use a steel fuel filter with two short pieces of ethanol resistant rubber hose, about 4", each side of the inline filter. I NEVER use plastic or worse still, glass filters.

I don't have a picture right now and the car is not home either for me to take one. I also NEVER use friggin gear clamps on stuff like that, only fuel line approved spring clamps, pinch type or the one's seen in pic. 

I've been criticized for using a filter before the pump, but I have found no problems by doing that. I made up a new 3/8" steel line to the carb with a short piece of rubber hose to take up vibration. Not a good picture, but you can see what I mean. The engine is a 351C 4V with a Holley 670 SA carb.

Another mod I did was to replace my tank and added SS 3/8" fuel lines with Ethanol resistant fuel injector hose where needed. I found the old steel lines were full of rust, hence the SS replacement.

Geoff.

 

 

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Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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wow what a mess.. it may not be a bad idea to replace all of it. i don't think there is a problem using copper for it's very easy to bend. filter before pump if fine too.

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Tips on clamps and filter duly noted!  But yes... this photo.  How the hose gets from the metal outlet at the fender to the fuel pump is what I need to know.  Do you have power steering and it's just not in this photo?  That open area is right where my p/s pump goes.

 

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As straight as possible, just not stretched tight. Yes, he has power steering, you can see the bracket. There is plenty of room under the PS pump to run the fuel hose straight, right under the pump.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Tips on clamps and filter duly noted!  But yes... this photo.  How the hose gets from the metal outlet at the fender to the fuel pump is what I need to know.  Do you have power steering and it's just not in this photo?  That open area is right where my p/s pump goes.

 

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Don beat me to it as I was logging in! 

Yes I do have PS. I took the pump off when I was replacing ALL my fuel system. The line to the carb is copper lined steel tube, easy to bend. I bought it with flares and nuts, then adapted to what I needed. The pump only has 5/16 outlet, so I had to come up with an adaptor and a short piece of 3/8" rubber tube as you can see.

I'm bringing the car home today now the new garage floor paint has cured and then I'll take a picture and post it. 

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My "new" floor.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Nice floor! Seriously, thanks for your help. And to Don C for the explanation; as short and straight running under the p/s pump without stressing the hose. Got it!

 

Looking forward to the follow-up photo; it's no problem... I'm not in a hurry because it doesn't have to be done until the p/s pump comes back from a rebuild.

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Here are some pics of factory original on my 73 mach 1 I took apart to clean. Has 12,301 miles probably original lines. Like someone stated use what are referred to as fuel injection line clamps. They are smooth and go all the way around the hose.

Your hoses look very old probably not ethanol resistant. I would change them all. Piece back at tank, section under the master cylinder where metal line comes through inner fender, piece going to fuel pump and short piece on the carb.

Someone suggested using copper line. That is not a good idea. Vibrations over time tend to harden the copper line and it will crack. Steel line much better they do repo them if you need new. The steel factory lines have the bulge that also helps the hose to seal.

There is another section of hose on top of the fuel tank that take the vapors to the charcoal canister. I would not worry about changing that unless you have the tank off. While you have the line loose at tank I would put piece of hose on it and stick in coke bottle and blow air through the line. You can also pour denatured alcohol in the line and let it sit that will dissolve any varnish build up in the metal line. Blow out and repeat until nothing comes out.

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When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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Nice floor!  Seriously, thanks for your help.  And to Don C for the explanation; as short and straight running under the p/s pump without stressing the hose.  Got it!

 

Looking forward to the follow-up photo; it's no problem... I'm not in a hurry because it doesn't have to be done until the p/s pump comes back from a rebuild.

Thanks for the cudo's. Just wish it were a two car garage, but then the wife would want to park her car in there as well, not happening!

David has posted some good info (as per usual) that shows exactly what that short line looks like. I just chose to put a steel filter in there as well. You could just as easily place one up by the carb, but I think that looks crappy. The original carb had a filter directly on the carb. If you still have the Autolite 4300 or 4300D (spread bore), it will have a filter. The Holley does not, only small sintered bronze mini filters in the inlet ports. 

If you chose to place a filter anywhere, PLEASE do not ever use those dangerous glass filters...……. unless you plan on burning your car up!!

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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When you updated/refreshed, did you add the in-line filter? (shown in my first photo)

 

In any case, I’m going to need to wait until the p/s pump returns to measure correctly.

 

Yes, all the rubber fuel lines are being replaced. They’re either ancient or incorrect.

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A fuel filter before the fuel pump is not necessary, but is required between the fuel pump and carburetor. The fuel filter before the fuel pump may contribute to vapor lock by adding some restriction to the fuel flow.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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A fuel filter before the fuel pump is not necessary, but is required between the fuel pump and carburetor. The fuel filter before the fuel pump may contribute to vapor lock by adding some restriction to the fuel flow.

 Don, not disagreeing with you or anybody about the possibility of vapor lock or other issues with a filter before the pump. Funny thing is my 72 had one fitted when I bought it in 1980, and so did my current 71 when I bought it in 2008. I guess I just followed along with it. On the plus side of the 'discussion', when I replaced all the fuel system a couple of years ago, that inline steel filter was plugged with rust from the old tank line. That rust would likely have taken out the pump and possible got through the sintered bronze things. 

So in hind sight, I probably could install one directly after the pump if there's room for it or just before the carb plumbing. Like I have said many times, I'll never use plastic or glass filter. Where it is is out of sight, out of mind and never been a problem with fuel flow. I guess it's up to owners to decide what's best for their ride.

To save space, here is a pic I just took. Unfortunately very hard to get with a reg. camera, it's a bit skewed,  but I think it shows what it intended.

Geoff.

PS Forgot to mention, I change that filter every Spring and it only gets about 2K miles of driving through it.

 

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Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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