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On your starter solenoid you have a red and light blue wire that pulls the solenoid in to run the starter motor. On the solenoid there is a separate set of contacts which has a red and green wire on it - this supplies 12 volts to your coil during start up - leave this wiring alone. The second red and green wire that is on your coil is the one you use to bring in a relay to supply 12v to your HEI dist. It's the wire that drops to 9v when the key is in the run position. If you look at the attached pdf you will see how to wire in the relay. The wire going from your ignition switch to terminal 85 on the relay is the red and green wire that drops to 9v when your key is in the run position.

 

https://documents.holley.com/frm33565_ready_to_run_add.pdf

 

Hope this helps

 

Shane

The only problem with using that red/green wire for a HEI relay is that the tachometer will not register a signal.

True

 

But if his HEI needs a full 12 volts at run there is not much he can do without running an msd tach adapter or something similar is there?

Adelaide

 

73 Mach 1

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On your starter solenoid you have a red and light blue wire that pulls the solenoid in to run the starter motor. On the solenoid there is a separate set of contacts which has a red and green wire on it - this supplies 12 volts to your coil during start up - leave this wiring alone. The second red and green wire that is on your coil is the one you use to bring in a relay to supply 12v to your HEI dist. It's the wire that drops to 9v when the key is in the run position. If you look at the attached pdf you will see how to wire in the relay. The wire going from your ignition switch to terminal 85 on the relay is the red and green wire that drops to 9v when your key is in the run position.

 

https://documents.holley.com/frm33565_ready_to_run_add.pdf

 

Hope this helps

 

Shane

The only problem with using that red/green wire for a HEI relay is that the tachometer will not register a signal.

True

 

But if his HEI needs a full 12 volts at run there is not much he can do without running an msd tach adapter or something similar is there?

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That simple plug &play, all-in-one, distributor has gotten rather complicated.

 

There's two ways you can go

1) get the MSD tach adapter, bypass the resistor wire to get 12 volts from the ignition switch.

2) get Rocketman's tachometer conversion, bypass the resistor wire to get 12 volts from the ignition switch.

 

Either of these methods can use the auxiliary relay to provide 12 volts directly from the battery. Using the relay with the MSD adapter requires bypassing the resistor wire. The resistor wire does not require the bypass when using Rocketman's conversion, if the Pertronix relay is used.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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It looks like we're not going to be able to talk you out of using the HEI distributor, so here's a couple of diagrams using the MSD tachometer adapter, one wired directly to the ignition switch, the other using a relay.

MSD-adapter-to-HEI.jpg

 

MSD-adapter-to-HEI-w-relay.jpg

 

I've also attached Rocketman's wiring diagram, using his tach conversion on the OEM tach, in case you decide to use the conversion (recommended) instead of the adapter.

RocketmanOEMTach.pdf

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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It looks like we're not going to be able to talk you out of using the HEI distributor, so here's a couple of diagrams using the MSD tachometer adapter, one wired directly to the ignition switch, the other using a relay.

MSD-adapter-to-HEI.jpg

 

MSD-adapter-to-HEI-w-relay.jpg

 

I've also attached Rocketman's wiring diagram, using his tach conversion on the OEM tach, in case you decide to use the conversion (recommended) instead of the adapter.

 

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Oh boy... I can't to see how this goes.  "Ford" and "HEI" are not exactly congruent terms.  :whistling:

 Glad to see I have at least a couple of members who see it my way. No HEI in a Ford. Even MSD is pushing it, but!!

It's nearly as bad as guys putting a Chev motor in a Ford Hot-Rod. Sacrilege!   

It's owners choice I guess from previous comments posted. Some like 'em stock others like 'em gaudy!

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Oh boy... I can't to see how this goes.  "Ford" and "HEI" are not exactly congruent terms.  :whistling:

 Glad to see I have at least a couple of members who see it my way. No HEI in a Ford. Even MSD is pushing it, but!!

It's nearly as bad as guys putting a Chev motor in a Ford Hot-Rod. Sacrilege!   

It's owners choice I guess from previous comments posted. Some like 'em stock others like 'em gaudy!

 

 I will keep my gaudy thank you. You know people used to be able to post their cars and questions on here without being put down or hammered. But seems lately that's all that happens when someone actually doesn't know and asks for help. WOW  Guess this site is heading down the same path as a lot of other sites.

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Oh boy... I can't to see how this goes.  "Ford" and "HEI" are not exactly congruent terms.  :whistling:

 Glad to see I have at least a couple of members who see it my way. No HEI in a Ford. Even MSD is pushing it, but!!

It's nearly as bad as guys putting a Chev motor in a Ford Hot-Rod. Sacrilege!   

It's owners choice I guess from previous comments posted. Some like 'em stock others like 'em gaudy!

 

 I will keep my gaudy thank you. You know people used to be able to post their cars and questions on here without being put down or hammered. But seems lately that's all that happens when someone actually doesn't know and asks for help. WOW  Guess this site is heading down the same path as a lot of other sites.

+1

73 Grande H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

 

- Jason

 

 

082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg

 

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Oh boy... I can't to see how this goes.  "Ford" and "HEI" are not exactly congruent terms.  :whistling:

 Glad to see I have at least a couple of members who see it my way. No HEI in a Ford. Even MSD is pushing it, but!!

It's nearly as bad as guys putting a Chev motor in a Ford Hot-Rod. Sacrilege!   

It's owners choice I guess from previous comments posted. Some like 'em stock others like 'em gaudy!

 

 I will keep my gaudy thank you. You know people used to be able to post their cars and questions on here without being put down or hammered. But seems lately that's all that happens when someone actually doesn't know and asks for help. WOW  Guess this site is heading down the same path as a lot of other sites.

 You know, you're right. I stand corrected and I do apologise if my comments offended anyone. That's NOT what I am about. I ought to have thought about it before adding my comments about HEI. Our new friend asked for help I was unable to give or even offer constructive criticism.

That doesn't change my opinion on adding none Ford parts, but everyone has a choice and like it or not, needs to be respected.

I for one, will try to be more respectful and choose my words appropriately for the good of our Forum.

:@

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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I'll add my apologies to Geoff's, I've always liked mentoring. But I also agree with him, if you want GM parts on a car, buy a Chevy. At least the next Mustang owner that wants to put an HEI in his car will have a wiring diagram for the tachometer.

 

It didn't bother me much in the fifties for someone building a hot rod to put a Chevy, Buick, Oldsmobile, or Chrysler engine into a Ford, or vice-versa. I helped a guy put a hemi into his '39 Chevy coupe in the early 60s. A lot of cross breeding back then, Cadillacs and Lincoln's went into a lot of other brand cars. But, it was different then, the supply of strong running engines was limited and the supply of hot rod bodies was plentiful.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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I'll add my apologies to Geoff's, I've always liked mentoring. But I also agree with him, if you want GM parts on a car, buy a Chevy. At least the next Mustang owner that wants to put an HEI in his car will have a wiring diagram for the tachometer.

 

It didn't bother me much in the fifties for someone building a hot rod to put a Chevy, Buick, Oldsmobile, or Chrysler engine into a Ford, or vice-versa. I helped a guy put a hemi into his '39 Chevy coupe in the early 60s. A lot of cross breeding back then, Cadillacs and Lincoln's went into a lot of other brand cars. But, it was different then, the supply of strong running engines was limited and the supply of hot rod bodies was plentiful.

Thank you Don.

I did get a bit carried away I'll admit. 

 

I have a friend with a plastic bodied 31 Ford with a Chev 350 in it. He bought it from the estate of a friend of ours who passed away last year. I rib him about the Chev engine every time it gives him troubles. I will reluctantly admit though, the Chev motor with the distributor at the back, does "package" nicer, keeping the dist. wires neat and tidy in an open motor hot-rod.

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Not only that, the rear sump oil pan works better with a straight front axle. Y blocks work well with rear sump needs, but they were never that popular, a 312 with 3 deuces could haul. I personally like the Y blocks, stout engine.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Not only that, the rear sump oil pan works better with a straight front axle. Y blocks work well with rear sump needs, but they were never that popular, a 312 with 3 deuces could haul. I personally like the Y blocks, stout engine.

Out of my wheelhouse I'm afraid. Best engine we had in England was a Lotus-Ford in the mid 60'...…. or maybe a jag 4.2. Me I still was riding motor cycles at 20, couldn't afford a car and when I did get one, it only had three wheels!!! You guys in the US were spoiled rotten, having cars at 16, I was still riding a pedal bike to school, well college actually.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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I started earning money when I was 12, by mowing lawns, then worked on a ranch during the summer and weekends, and then worked in a service station, and yes, I had a car when I was 16, that I bought with my own money. And, I'm still working part time 60+ years later. Spoiled???

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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I started earning money when I was 12, by mowing lawns, then worked on a ranch during the summer and weekends, and then worked in a service station, and yes, I had a car when I was 16, that I bought with my own money. And, I'm still working part time 60+ years later. Spoiled???

 Well Don, we're waaayy off base here now, but having some fun. 

"Spoiled" might have been pushing it a bit too far. You and a great many others worked hard for their rides, but for me in Britain going to college till I was 20, then starting work, all I could afford was a Norton 500cc motorcycle. At that time not many of my friends had cars either, so when we saw movies from the US where ALL the young kids had cars going to school in the 60's, you can understand that we thought US kids were "spoiled".

 OK, back to the subject on hand,

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Wow.  I did NOT see all of that coming.

 

My original comment was to merely point out that HEI is to GM, what Duraspark is to Ford.  When the Original Poster used the term "Ford HEI," it just struck me funny, as those are not terms typically used together.

 

There's no discounting the performance factor for MSD ignition systems, either.  Sure, they're HEI-derived but are really more of an HEI/Duraspark blend, having an externally mounted ignition control module (6AL, et al).  The Pertronix is kind of the opposite, putting the control module inside the distributor (to replace the points), but still using the external coil.  Most of the others are similar as well, taking this or that from these or those.  It's all about your preference for your car.  The bottom line for those products, however, is that they're a sum of all their parts.  MSD is MSD, and not really "HEI" anymore.  DUI, Pertronix, et al, are no different, being aftermarket performance parts and all.

 

For my own purposes, I never intentionally cross-pollinate pieces and parts from one to the other.  I prefer my cars to stay true to their heritage and still with factory parts/options whenever I can.  Have you ever gone to a parts store looking for a particular item, and the guy at the counter asks what car it's for?  PITA.  Of course, they're usually really interested when you tell them your HEI system is for a Mustang, but I know quite a few that are brand loyal and will talk a little smack for mix-matching various things.  For instance, yesterday I had to explain why I needed a distributor cap and rotor from a '79 F-150 I-6 for my '80 Jeep CJ-7 when he had parts aplenty for the Jeep (I upgraded the ignition from the stock AMC coil and dizzy to a Ford TFI Super Coil set-up - while still using the factory Duraspark system that came from AMC).  The guy got my parts and even made the comment, "Well, at least these will get you some Ford Blue under that hood."  Whatever, Dude - it's a Jeep... it's a GM engine, running a Ford ignition system, with a GM carb (Carter BBD), a Tremec transmission, and Dana transfer case and axles.  AMC Jeep literally used everybody else's stuff from the factory.

 

As far as being "gaudy," I'm thinking mine could fall into that category.  Pop the hood and you're greeted by lots of Edelbrock chrome bolt-ons and performance parts, but that's what everybody did back in the day - mine is/was intended all along to celebrate that era.

Eric

mach1sig2.gif

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Alright guys, I sent all the Gm stuff back. I got a SB Ford 351C 351M 400M Small Cap HEI Electronic Distributor Ready To Run 1970-79 with a 45000v coil. The distributor has a red and a black wire. Can you tell me how to wire this setup? Dist to the coil, power supply and anything else that I need to know.    Thanks

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Alright guys, I sent all the Gm stuff back. I got a SB Ford 351C 351M 400M Small Cap HEI Electronic Distributor Ready To Run 1970-79 with a 45000v coil. The distributor has a red and a black wire. Can you tell me how to wire this setup? Dist to the coil, power supply and anything else that I need to know.    Thanks

 

 Polite question; What brand did you buy? 

I would think different brands (or makes) might possibly be different in the way they hook up. Just trying to help, not offend as I might have unintentionally before. My sincere apologies if I did,

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Alright guys, I sent all the Gm stuff back. I got a SB Ford 351C 351M 400M Small Cap HEI Electronic Distributor Ready To Run 1970-79 with a 45000v coil. The distributor has a red and a black wire. Can you tell me how to wire this setup? Dist to the coil, power supply and anything else that I need to know.    Thanks

 

Did it not come with some sort of directions or manual?

 

 Polite question; What brand did you buy? 

 

If it's the one I'm thinking it is, send it back now.

 

https://swperformanceparts.com/R2R6706BL/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwivbsBRDsARIsADyISJ_ijKWgiJ5uMuuXliVfFtm1hg9IAywzoc4EytGrok6fYJpKJ1nvB2gaAg92EALw_wcB

 

I bought one of this type off Amazon, just to see how bad it was. Not only did it arrive damaged, it was one of the biggest POSes I've ever held in my hands.

 

 

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cuedog10, may I ask why you simply did not just ask what distributor would be best for YOUR application. Without going back and reading the whole post, can you remind me/us exactly what motor, cam, carb, vacuum in inches of mercury (Hg) you have. Is it stock or modified.

A properly built and curved Motorcraft/Autolite distributor with a Pertronix Ignitor II and matching coil is all you need in a stock motor imo. However, the DuraSpark would be my choice if I had to do it again. They are not that expensive, but if you want something built for your engine specs, Performance Distributors can do that for you, but you're looking at 265 plus dollars. Google them. Pertronix also make drop in distributors for the 351C, but I've heard good and bad about them. I do know form my own experience that the Pertronix Ignitor III is not a good option if installed in a stock factory distributor, that's why I mentioned the P II.

Geoff.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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