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Thanks for the looping suggestion Hemikiller. That should work fine.

 

The reason I thought of removing the shocks/tower was because while at the bodyshop the engine bay will be stripped and painted. No other reason for removal, just thought with them out of the way it would be easier for paint.

Brett

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Holy Shamolee! It's a real Bobby-Dazzler!!!!!!!!!!!!!  

Just got word that this Friday the 16th is the planned delivery day!

Looks really great from the pics.  The price of the paint or clear does not have any thing to do with orange peel.  Some paint is more forgiving when spraying but even the cheapest of the lot can be s

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If the bodyshop is doing the engine compartment, I'd be inclined to strip everything off the front of the car and deliver it to them on a dolly or something like that.

 

 

Yes, that would be the best way. But the logistics of delivering the Mach 1 sans front suspension are complicated. I looked into buying a nice car trailer last month, but couldn't justify the expense. I don't own a welder and have only a rudimentary knowledge of welding (I suck). We planned on just renting a Uhaul car trailer to bring the Mustang to the bodyshop.

 

I do have a coworker/friend that is an excellent welder/fabricator that could fab a dolly setup if we have time. We could probably build some type of dolly that utilizes suspension bolting points and buy some solid wheelbarrow tires from Lowes/HD. Might still be a pain in the arse using a come-along to winch the Mustang body up on the uhaul trailer. Some random thoughts on the fact that having the engine compartment painted with the suspension intact has been bothering me.

Brett

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 The bellhousing had a mouse nest. Full of goat head seeds and mouse turds. Hope I don't get the hanta virus.

 

Must be a pretty common occurrence.

My Dad went to back out of my driveway a few years ago in his 96 F150, and the clutch wouldn't engage. Suspecting damaged clutch pressure plate, got it home, tore into it and found it was full of mice nesting. It was also full of dog food, from where the mice were raiding the dog dinner bowl from the garage. It was just about this time of year when the rodents are seeking somewhere warm to shelter. 

 

That small vent hole in the bottom of the bell housing is just perfect for them to climb in and out.

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aprons-002.jpgtail-panel-014.jpgIMG-1641.jpg 

 

 

I have suggestion. Pull the shocks and springs. Cut a 4x4 block of wood to fit in place of the spring to hold car up. Pre loosen all suspension bolts up.  The BS should be able to deal with R & I of the suspension easy enough at that point.

- Mike

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I have suggestion. Pull the shocks and springs. Cut a 4x4 block of wood to fit in place of the spring to hold car up. Pre loosen all suspension bolts up.  The BS should be able to deal with R & I of the suspension easy enough at that point.

 

 

Great idea on the 4x4 wood block, thanks! I do have a couple of 4x4 scrap pieces in the shop. 

 

You wouldn't happen to know the length that works on the 4x4?

 

Would the Mustang still be loadable onto a car trailer without worrying(too much) about the block of wood popping out?

 

Thanks!

Brett

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Put a lag screw or a construction screw and washer through one of the lower shock mount holes in the spring saddle. Knowing the length of the shock, you'd be around 12", but grab a tape measure to be certain.

 

 

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Put a lag screw or a construction screw and washer through one of the lower shock mount holes in the spring saddle.  Knowing the length of the shock, you'd be around 12", but grab a tape measure to be certain.

 

 

Thanks!

 

Started removing brake components today. I emptied the master cylinder as much as possible. Also looped the power steering lines together.

 

As a side note, I am somewhat anxious about removing the coil springs. I've done it before on my project car. But I was present when a friend of mine had a coil spring compressor tool break while removing springs from a Chevelle, many years ago. The spring cleared his head by a fraction of an inch as it flew across the shop. The echoes of it clanging and banging still can be heard in the back of my mind. That happened thirty years ago and I still vividly remember how "white" his face turned, which was followed by him dropping whatever tools he held and just walking out of the auto hobby shop at the base we were stationed together.

 

It also looks like I'll be temporarily dropping the steering column to remove the clutch/brake pedal assembly. Anything to be aware of, other than removing hardware?

Brett

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“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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That is the one that I used after trying the ones at the local auto parts stores. Very easy to use, still gives a pucker when the springs creak but very safe.  Good luck.

 

Tom

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That is the one that I used after trying the ones at the local auto parts stores. Very easy to use, still gives a pucker when the springs creak but very safe.  Good luck.

 

Tom

 

 

Very nice tool! Thanks!

Brett

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Here is my answer to suspension removal for rebuilding. Its a couple steering type Harbor Freight casters and some 3" steel channel iron.

Worked well for me and I even moved it on and off the trailer for sand blasting before and after. Also, I suggest the "DazeCars" spring compressor and built one myself.

Thanks, Jay

 

 

Mustang-031512-003.jpg

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IMG-1669.jpgIMG-1687.jpg 

 

I did run a screw down from the top down to hold the block in place so I could jack the car up and the block would stay in place.

 

I ran the car on and off the trailer 3 times.  The block was around a foot long.

- Mike

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Ordered the spring compressor from ebay. We have 13 days until our tentative scheduled date at the bodyshop. Hopefully by the time the tool arrives it is all that is left to do on my wife's Mach 1.

 

I perused our bodyshop's FB page yesterday and noticed all the photos of his projects started with either mostly assembled or completely assembled vehicles. The shop owner knows we are bringing in a rolling shell. But I hope and I say this with pride, it shocks the heck out of his employees when they see my wife's Mach 1 arrive on a uhaul car trailer completely stripped with just the essentials to make it roll. My wife wanted to learn how to do bodywork and paint, but with the 12 year pause and little kids now, that isn't realistic.

Brett

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Put some oil on the threads. Trust me on this!!!

73 Grande H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

 

- Jason

 

 

082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg

 

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Old gasoline....STINKS...BAD!

 

Got that out of the way. Hard to believe there would be anything left in the lines after almost 30 years of being off the road and no gas tank for at least half that. Probably mostly additives. Smelled like rotten varnish. Had to open all the windows and doors to the shop to ventilate. It was a comfortable 60 degrees in the shop and 34 outside.

 

Almost done with teardown for the bodyshop. Removed fuel and brake lines on Saturday. The fuel vent line and brake lines were well documented for position and routing, but fuel line was not documented at all, it just got removed and tossed outside. Removed calipers, sway bar, motor mounts and coil springs today.

 

I still have to fab up some wood blocks to replace springs and remove clutch/brake pedal assembly. There still is some window sealant that needs to be scraped. I'd just use acetone, but it's cold outside and I must be getting older, because I like the heaters in my shop.

 

The Dazesprings tool worked great. A milk crate was used for support until I was ready to pull the upper A-arm.

 

 

 

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Original color; Ivy Glow...

 

 

 

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Brett

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On the use of the DazeCars spring compressor tool;

 

I used Rem Oil to keep the threaded rod lubed to prevent galling. The big nut is 1 1/4" and the two nuts on the welded bolts are 9/16".

 

When installing the nuts at the lower shock mount holes I had to use a wrench to tighten the nut on the outboard welded bolt/stud. The tolerances were too tight to use a socket. When flipping it 180 degrees on the drivers side the nut would not install on the welded bolt as it was too close to the spring perch. I had flipped it 180 because the threaded rod was touching the upper shock tower mount bracket. So I flipped it back and did not have any interference with the threaded rod and the upper shock support bracket. It might be a stack up of tolerances or the drivers side of the cars suspension is crooked (there is evidence of accident damage on this side of the car). Although the threaded rod never really is centered on either side.

 

Also I supported the rotor/spindle with a milk crate when unbolting the spring perch from the A-arm to keep the suspension from dropping before I unbolted the A-arm. The directions noted that the spring only needs to be compressed 3-4 inches. I did an eyeball measurement until I felt it was compressed enough, then I measured from the center of the bearing hub to the floor. At 21 inches that was just right. The bottom of the frame to the floor measurement with the car on jackstands was 21.75 inches.

 

After the spring and perch were removed from the upper a-arm I was concerned, that while the directions stated to loosen the nut to remove compressed spring tension I thought that the whole assembly would just spin. It did not and worked great.

 

I highly recommend this tool. Having never removed coil springs from a Ford before and never using a spring tool like this one it was easy and safe.

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Brett

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Great! I have a set of the external compressors that have this little j-hook that's supposed to keep the compressor bolts from moving. I used it once on struts and was nervous the whole time. That was many years ago, don't know why I still have them. Maybe my wife is right, I'm a tool hoarder :)

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Great! I have a set of the external compressors that have this little j-hook that's supposed to keep the compressor bolts from moving. I used it once on struts and was nervous the whole time. That was many years ago, don't know why I still have them. Maybe my wife is right, I'm a tool hoarder :)

 

 

It's a great tool! Get one you won't be disappointed. 

 

I too have a thing for tools and also maintenance manuals.

Brett

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I finished fabbing wooden coil spring replacements. The 4x4 blocks ended up being 11" in length. I installed two 5/16X2" lag screws through the lower shock mount holes. I used a piece of scrap aluminum across the top of the shock tower with another 5/16X2 lag screw to attach the top of the block of wood.

 

With the help of a neighbor we rolled the camaro out of the shop and used some HF wheel dollies to move the Mach 1 so it too could go out the door. Between picking up the uhaul car trailer, installing wooden coil spring replacements, moving "stuff" out of the way, assembling HF wheel dollies, moving two cars out of the shop and using a come-along to winch the Camaro back in the shop it took about 6 hours. We ran out of daylight and have to load the Mach 1 onto the trailer this morning.

 

Today is the day! The Mach 1 is taking a huge leap toward the ultimate goal of being streetable again. It may have antiquated steering, suspension, brakes and drivetrain. But it will not be mistaken for anything else on the road. My wife's 1972 Ford Mustang Mach 1 will boast of its American pedigree with its unique body style. Its contours, curves and steel muscle car bulk will speak to the heart of yesteryear that resides within those of us that remember what it was like to not have to seek out emblems to identify make, model and brand.

 

As we lie awake in bed last night my wife spoke of how she felt like it was Christmas eve. Such as it felt when she was a little girl.

 

I only wish I had the knowledge and skills that many posess on this forum to truly restore the entire Mustang ourselves. I do not, I am only a fair wrench turner. Therefore we must contract out the bodywork and paint. It won't go any faster as this is a huge financial undertaking. The time to reassemble will be dictated by how much we can afford to buy parts. Fortunately we will be able to refurbish many parts ourselves.

 

 

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Brett

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ontrailer12-16-19.jpg

 

 

A pic of the Mustang on the trailer from the other day.

 

The bodyshop called and said the Mustang is done being "blasted" down to bare steel and we are planning a trip to the bodyshop tomorrow to have a look. I hope there is enough metal left after the primer/bondo and rust are gone. Will post pics tomorrow.

Brett

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Visited the bodyshop today. Good news and bad news. But it's all fixable....by a professional. It got a bit more expensive, which will add an unknown time to completion.

 

The previously replaced passenger quarter panel that was discovered during teardown is good to go. But the drivers quarter is toast, it's all wrinkly, its gotta go. Passenger rocker is also getting replaced, its bent.

 

 

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The missing seams have reappeared.

 

 

 

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Brett

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