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Need help determining value


slowpoke17
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I have a 73 coupe that I bought a few years ago. Slowly been rebuilding it but I'm at a point where I can't spend the time I need to to finish it. The car is solid with no rust, only 57k on the clock. I have a complete new interior ready to install, front drum brake to be replaced with new disc brake conversion, new power booster, all new lines etc. New complete fuel system minus the gas cap. Rebuilt 302 with 0 miles ready for install. New Cooper Cobra tires with new American racing wheels. Just wondering what I could possibly get for this, more info to follow when I can get home.

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That is really a tough question.

 

Not sure how much value the 57k miles brings when you have torn everything down and rebuilt the engine.

 

So coupes don't bring as much as convertibles, Fastbacks and Mach 1's, and you have the base power train.  In addition you have it in pieces, so it is not running, or driveable and you don't have a complete interior in it.

 

Is the body painted?(The yellow in your signature pic?)  +1

Nice wheels and tires   +1

Brakes have not been completed.  -1 (If the old brakes are still on and function this is a neutral.)

Interior not installed   -1

 

If you have any bandwidth to do anything, I would suggest installing the interior if the body is painted.  A pretty, yellow car that rolls and just needs the new engine put in looks like a better opportunity than one that needs both interior and mechanical.  If the car looks clean and has a clean interior, a box of parts to upgrade the brakes IF I WANT, and a fresh, proper date code engine, ready to go in might get you more traffic for sale.

 

Price, I wish I could help, but its whatever the person hands you when you are ready to let it go.  So my opinion.  As you described it I would say $2000-$2500, if you have good paint, the interior in and the new wheels and tires on it so it looks good, maybe up to $4000.  But I can be way off either way as I am not a buyer or seller right now.

 

Hope my opinion gives food for thought.

 

kcmash

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Without being able to show that it runs the engine is just a boat anchor, unless it has a transferable warranty. I agree with kc's assessment, a car that is in parts, even though all of the parts are there, is worth much less than a drivable car. The have been several forum members that have bought cars like that, that were supposedly complete, and had a tough time getting them back together. Missing small parts, and not knowing where the small parts go, how the wiring harnesses are run, etc. makes it hard to buy a car that is in pieces, let alone reassembling them.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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That is really a tough question.

 

Not sure how much value the 57k miles brings when you have torn everything down and rebuilt the engine.

 

So coupes don't bring as much as convertibles, Fastbacks and Mach 1's, and you have the base power train.  In addition you have it in pieces, so it is not running, or driveable and you don't have a complete interior in it.

 

Is the body painted?(The yellow in your signature pic?)  +1

Nice wheels and tires   +1

Brakes have not been completed.  -1 (If the old brakes are still on and function this is a neutral.)

Interior not installed   -1

 

If you have any bandwidth to do anything, I would suggest installing the interior if the body is painted.  A pretty, yellow car that rolls and just needs the new engine put in looks like a better opportunity than one that needs both interior and mechanical.  If the car looks clean and has a clean interior, a box of parts to upgrade the brakes IF I WANT, and a fresh, proper date code engine, ready to go in might get you more traffic for sale.

 

Price, I wish I could help, but its whatever the person hands you when you are ready to let it go.  So my opinion.  As you described it I would say $2000-$2500, if you have good paint, the interior in and the new wheels and tires on it so it looks good, maybe up to $4000.  But I can be way off either way as I am not a buyer or seller right now.

 

Hope my opinion gives food for thought.

 

kcmash

 

 

Hmmm, not sure I concur with your valuation of coupes in comparison to the other models. For me, it comes down to the condition of the car, doesn't matter the model when they are near 50 year's old IMO. I just bought a Coupe, first one in 40 year's and paid what you might consider fastback or convertible money... But, the condition was near excellent, so...

"Yes dear", has kept me in the hobby a long time...

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A car in parts is worth 1/3 what a running, driving car is worth. If a '73 302 coupe in very good condition is worth $8k, then you're looking at $3k, maybe $4k to the right buyer. Your best option would be to get a crew together and get the engine in and running.

 

Sell the new parts off piecemeal, as you'll get very little return on them in a package deal.

 

 

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Thanks for all the input, some food for thought right now. When I consider all the money I've spent on parts and now have everything pretty much ready to go the hard part is being physically able to complete it. I've contemplated having it completed and running through a shop but the added expense only added to the amount of loss when sold. I always knew they weren't that valuable so my being able to do most of the work made it feasible. With the car purchase and all the new parts I've invested about $6 grand. I guess we didn't get into this hobby to get rich!

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If you make a list of all the parts and the price you paid for them, it may help some. However, you have to realize the parts were just new when you bought them. Sitting around allows dings and rust to start showing up on body panels, and rust on parts that have not been stored in a climate controlled facility.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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If you make a list of all the parts and the price you paid for them, it may help some. However, you have to realize the parts were just new when you bought them. Sitting around allows dings and rust to start showing up on body panels, and rust on parts that have not been stored in a climate controlled facility.

I know what your saying, normally that's an issue. I have everything inside in a spare room off the garage that is climate controlled and away from possible damage. Here are some of the parts waiting for install. 

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