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Inner & outer tie rod premature wear


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I'm having some kind of strange issue with my suspension.

I replaced the complete front suspension to brand new parts last September. I put around (or slightly less than) 3k miles since.

I was about to set the alignment because the car is pulling to the left and having uneven tire wear.

The alignment shop told me they couldn't set the alignment because I need front wheel bearings first (it wasn't changed then so probably it's time to do it...just natural wear) but the inner & outer tie rods are kind of strange to me. I almost never drive in bumpy roads and they shouldn't fail around 3k miles.

They are Moog so I'd except reliability from them. Is there anybody who had issues with Moog? Is there any chance that I got faulty parts?

I want to make sure to check everything before taking it apart and ordering replacements...

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Take care of the wheel bearings first, then see if you still have the problem. Loose wheel bearings increases negative camber and can also allow the tires to toe out when driving.

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“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Take care of the wheel bearings first, then see if you still have the problem. Loose wheel bearings increases negative camber and can also allow the tires to toe out when driving.

 

Thanks,

Yes, that's what I'll do first. My main concern about the tie rod ends is that the alignment guy showed that they also have a play in them. 

But I hop I'll be lucky enough to solve it only with the bearings.

 

If it'll be the tie rod ends too Is there any method to check faulty parts before installing them?

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On any ball and socket joint (tie rod ends, ball joints, etc) a new joint will feel fairly stiff and not easy to move. On joints that are in good condition there should be "slip but no slop" meaning you should not feel freeplay in the joint. If you feel any slop the joint is worn out. What grease did you use in the joints you installed last September?

[align=left]Jeff T.

 

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passengers. [/align]

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On any ball and socket joint (tie rod ends, ball joints, etc) a new joint will feel fairly stiff and not easy to move. On joints that are in good condition there should be "slip but no slop" meaning you should not feel freeplay in the joint. If you feel any slop the joint is worn out.  What grease did you use in the joints you installed last September?

 

I don't know because I took it to a shop to replace the whole front suspension.

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Moog products carry either a Lifetime warranty or a 36 month on the R-series parts. If the tie-rods have play, bring it back to the repair shop that did the work for replacement *and* a front end alignment. They can file a claim with their supplier for reimbursement of parts and labor.

 

I would replace your wheel bearings beforehand though...

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Moog products carry either a Lifetime warranty or a 36 month on the R-series parts. If the tie-rods have play, bring it back to the repair shop that did the work for replacement *and* a front end alignment. They can file a claim with their supplier for reimbursement of parts and labor.

 

I would replace your wheel bearings beforehand though...

 

Well I supplied the parts for them from Summit so I can blow the labor... I think the parts still under warranty so I'll contact them if it'll be the same after the bearings.

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One thing that can kill your front suspension in a short time is a driving habit most people have. Back when there was no power steering you could not sit still and turn the front wheels unless you were a weight lifter, lol. They had huge dia. steering wheels to give you leverage and you also had to have the car moving slightly to allow the tires to do their sideways and front to back movement.

So out comes Power Steering. People tend to sit still and turn the wheels. As you turn the steering wheel the tires have to slide sideways and forward and back. If you look under the car while someone else is turning the wheels with tires on grass you will see what is taking place. This increases the forces on your suspension components multiple times normal forces. This will wear the suspension way faster. If you are barely moving while turning the force is normal and not trying to pull the joints apart. Kills ball joints, tie rods upper and lower control arm bushings all get punished. With the tires turning there is very little force. 

You will also notice that front end alignment will last much longer. Also bumping a parking curb is really tough on front end. 

If you have a go pro camera mount under the car and go on curvy road the suspension is very weak on all Mustangs. 

My current driver F-150 super crew I bought new in 2002. It turned over 304,000 miles last week and has never had a front end alignment and nothing under it ever replaced. 

I drove a Ford Econoline 1969 vand 467,000 miles with no alignment and nothing replaced. They were king pin and twin I beam and super tough. I also drove a 1985 Ford van 275,000 miles and never aligned and nothing replaced. 

My son not so. We had to replace his ball joints and suspension on his Ranger pickup in like 100,000 miles and also his F-150 ball joints failed way early.

Our yearly inspection includes ball joints and front end wear. The nailed him on both of his vehicles. 

I have always let the wheels roll when turning and it makes huge difference in wear. 

Weird that garage said wheel bearing bad? Were they loose, making noise or what? Most people do not tighten the spindle nut to Ford spec.

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When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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They checked the wheels and the bearings lose or have play in them. I don't know when it was replaced before me. The shop didn't replaced last year. After checking them they said they're ok. It was September and there weren't any issues until now.

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They checked the wheels and the bearings loss or have play in them. I don't know when it was replaced before me. The shop didn't replaced last year. After checking them they said they're ok. It was September and there weren't any issues until now.

Those are tapered roller bearings they must not have put them in correct before. You have to torque the spindle nut to spec. or they will be loose.

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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