Jump to content

Back seat panel alignment convertible.


Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

I am restoring a 1973 convertible. I noticed a big alignment issue of the backseat panel. It looks like it was welded in like this in the factory. 

The question is , would you leave it this way or would it be better to correct the panel? I am not sure if you would notice it when everything is installed again, so hopefully some convertible owners can advise...

20200908_123212.thumb.jpg.ea647295033e54d9e73bc800db935842.jpg

20200908_123716~2.jpg

20200908_123731~2.jpg

20200908_123229~2.jpg

20200908_123245.jpg

20200908_123240.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have several verts. I do not think I would worry about that. Lots of things are not even on these cars. My rear spoiler is way crooked but never noticed it until I measured it. Same with the hood black not straight but never noticed until I was measuring for another member. 

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine is the same. Not quite level, and left to right is off a good bit as shown in photo. I thought it was bad repair work but the more I look at it the more it looks like it was made that way. Longer on the passenger side.

2272E70C-924B-4D4A-ACCC-058D15934C58.JPG

Edited by Froggy
Link to post
Share on other sites

Plus or minus a half inch was pretty normal back then. If it fits... send it! 

[align=left]Jeff T.

 

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passengers. [/align]

Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL, 1/2" would be difficult to make anything out that much. On most stamping check fixtures you set the panel on nets that are located the same place on the check fixture and the weld assembly fixture. The nets are 3.0 mm tall and then around the edges of the part for trim line or form you also have a gap check that is 3.0 mm nominal. The part would never fit on the fixture if it was off over 3.0 mm or about 1/8". 
On some mating weld surface you would only have = / - .25mm or about .010". Some would be = / - .5 mm. Each panel has an elongated hole and a round hole that are used to locate the stamping in the check fixture and weld fixture.

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

Link to post
Share on other sites

I completely understand, I built dies, gages and fixtures for over 25 years. Typically I agree on 1 part but with stack up things can go quite a ways. If the parts in question are not off by more than 1/4" i'd be surprised. Back then net surfaces were 1/8"... LOL!  We also scaled mylars for most "fresh air fit" dimensions. Back in the 70s hand drawn parts were a quite bit more loosey - goosey than in more recent cad designed part days. Today a designer thinks if he can design it to 5 or 6 decimal places the part can be built that tight. I started my diemaking apprenticeship well before cad and CNC. It's good to see another toolmaker around. 

[align=left]Jeff T.

 

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passengers. [/align]

Link to post
Share on other sites

In my car, although not a vert, around the rear seat back is where I have seen the worst welding and alignment

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, droptop73 said:

Plus or minus a half inch was pretty normal back then. If it fits... send it! 

It is about half inch on my car so it must have been good enough  ;-)

Link to post
Share on other sites

After I retired several shops I had worked with on tooling wanted to hire me. I ended up going to China with two suit cases and lived there for a year that time. I was engineering manager at a good sized shop several hundred die makers. Rows of CNC equipment, I think we had over 50 wire EDM machines. We could go tools way faster than in the U.S. and I have seen first hit parts in the 90% to print range. We used what ever components the customer wanted and flew leader pins and bushing, nitrogen systems from the U.S. to China built the tool and shipped by boat and would beat any quotes in U.S.. The unions have killed the U.S.. No way can we compete. We did work around the world got to Germany a couple times while with them. They did not want me to leave but they paid for my home and shop so good for me. 

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...