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73' H-code Convertible named Sheila


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Got the engine pulled this past weekend with a lot of help from my dad. Had to make about 5 trips back and forth to different stores to get different tools and equipment. We ended up pulling it with the headers and trans attached with a 2-ton hoist. We took all the pulleys and brackets off, starter, A/C all removed. That A/C is heavy! We probably could have left some of it on, because we had some room to move. Had to cut a power steering tube and a trans tube that I stripped a fitting nut on trying to get it off. Anyways, it’s mounted on a stand and ready to be taken apart. Most of the components are waiting to be degreased. I’ve labeled anything that I can’t keep on the part. I also only took pictures of the brackets, so hopefully that’s enough to know how they go back on.

Engine-3.jpg

Engine-4.jpg

Engine-2-2.jpg

Engine-1.jpg

Mustang-parts.jpg

Right now the plan is to get the engine apart, put it back together with upgrades, and paint it. Then I’ll look at the body and other components while the engine is out and see what actually needs done there.

See this link for info on what’s already been done to the car:

 

 

And I’ve changed some things on the list of work that I want to do on it:

-Engine/components: New intake, carb, camshaft (already have headers). Have the heads done at a local machine shop that was recommended to me. I’d like to get at least 250hp after these upgrades, but not sure if I’ll need to do more to get there. Also needs a new radiator and replacement fan (thing makes so much noise you can’t hear the engine idle over it).  New air filter, A/C delete, replacing some tubes and wires, etc.

-Transmission: Rebuild the FMX trans. Depending on how that goes I might just look around for a cheap AOD, but I’m going to give it a shot.

-Body: There is a concerning amount of rust under the body and possibly on structural areas (floor pans), so likely some repair work to be done there. Once I’m confident it’s structurally sound and the rust is under control, I’ll have it painted.

-Suspension, Brakes, etc.: Need power steering hoses (maybe all new power steering).  Brakes aren’t great or at least I don’t know what good brakes for this car should feel like.  Rear brakes are still drum brakes.  Will be getting a new master cylinder at the least and I’ll look into the better options to get better braking power.

-Wheels:  I’ve had vibration at 60-70mph for as long as I can remember and I’m almost positive it’s from one of the stock wheels.  So I’m thinking replacement rims that can still fit the hubcaps, which are in great condition.

-Interior: Drivers seat is getting pretty torn up and I really want to keep these original. The rear quarter panels paint is peeling and those need refinished. Door window crank mechanism on passenger side has always felt gummed up or something. Probably need to clean out those areas and freshen up the crank mechanisms.

 

Any suggestions on the route that I should go are welcome. I’m still undecided on a few things, but I’ll change things as I go. I’m also trying to get parts ordered well in advance to account for the current state of the supply chain…

73' H-code Convertible

351C 2V

FMX automatic

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Glad to see you get started on the build.
I would make a couple of suggestions. I am 72 and am an original owner of a 1973 Mach 1. I also have several convertibles. On mistake I see too many make is to work on the engine first. That is exciting and goes really fast compared to the chassis / body. I have bought several failed builds in the past. One is a 1972 Q code vert and the other a 1973 Grande H code. The original owner built the engine and transmission for the Q code vert first. Engine has been on stand for over 10 years and will be torn down and built again. The transmission might be ok. The Grande he had torn engine down sent to be bored and had all of the parts to rebuild. He had also pulled the seats and had new foam and seat covers installed.
The owner of the Q vert then started on the body had it dip striped and needed floor and trunk and both quarters. He got it back to rolling chassis in epoxy primer and went through a divorce and sold it to me. He had $16,000 in receipts and I got everything for $5,500. I got the totally rust free grande with the new seats and car is loaded with great options for $1,000
I would suggest you send the engine out and have it cleaned and checked for cracks and once you determine everything is good oil up and put in plastic bags and let it set.

Take the chassis to a frame shop before you tear it down. Let them hang gauges and put the chassis back to zero. A  Mustang can get the chassis bent by jacking wrong or driving across a twist in the driving surface. The frame shop I use has highway patrol cars all the time due to them crossing the median and twisting the chassis. Those are much stronger than a Mustang full of rust. Then get you a chassis JIG to put the chassis when you are removing and replacing panels. Some of the failed projects I looked at were put together so out of alignment they were junk or parts car at best.
If you have rusty front floors you have a bad cowl. Rusty rear floors in rear are roof rail leaks or convertible top leaks. Trunk rust is usually tail light leaks.
You see the TV shows and they do a 7 day wonder build you cannot believe all they show. In a talented trained shop a fully ground up restoration will pass 2,000 hours easily.
Back to the engine. If you build it and it sits very long the break in lube dries up or if you turn it by hand to keep the valve springs from sitting you will wipe the break in lube off and engine will eat the cam and lifters as soon as you   crank it.
Great to see you jump in and we have several members in deep ground up builds right now. One even attended the local technical school and took welding course. Doing a car is not rocket science but if you do not do it right nothing fit and you will have all kinds of issues and give up like so many do.

Food for thought.

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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I wouldn't start replacing your wheels before verifying it is a wheel. It easy to check the lateral and radial runout. You may have a bent rear axle. If you do have runout on a rear wheel, swap it for one from the front that has already passed the test, to see if the runout goes away. Then verify by measuring the runout on the axle flange, this will require a dial indicator.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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18 hours ago, Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs said:

Glad to see you get started on the build.
I would make a couple of suggestions. I am 72 and am an original owner of a 1973 Mach 1. I also have several convertibles. On mistake I see too many make is to work on the engine first. That is exciting and goes really fast compared to the chassis / body. I have bought several failed builds in the past. One is a 1972 Q code vert and the other a 1973 Grande H code. The original owner built the engine and transmission for the Q code vert first. Engine has been on stand for over 10 years and will be torn down and built again. The transmission might be ok. The Grande he had torn engine down sent to be bored and had all of the parts to rebuild. He had also pulled the seats and had new foam and seat covers installed.
The owner of the Q vert then started on the body had it dip striped and needed floor and trunk and both quarters. He got it back to rolling chassis in epoxy primer and went through a divorce and sold it to me. He had $16,000 in receipts and I got everything for $5,500. I got the totally rust free grande with the new seats and car is loaded with great options for $1,000
I would suggest you send the engine out and have it cleaned and checked for cracks and once you determine everything is good oil up and put in plastic bags and let it set.

Take the chassis to a frame shop before you tear it down. Let them hang gauges and put the chassis back to zero. A  Mustang can get the chassis bent by jacking wrong or driving across a twist in the driving surface. The frame shop I use has highway patrol cars all the time due to them crossing the median and twisting the chassis. Those are much stronger than a Mustang full of rust. Then get you a chassis JIG to put the chassis when you are removing and replacing panels. Some of the failed projects I looked at were put together so out of alignment they were junk or parts car at best.
If you have rusty front floors you have a bad cowl. Rusty rear floors in rear are roof rail leaks or convertible top leaks. Trunk rust is usually tail light leaks.
You see the TV shows and they do a 7 day wonder build you cannot believe all they show. In a talented trained shop a fully ground up restoration will pass 2,000 hours easily.
Back to the engine. If you build it and it sits very long the break in lube dries up or if you turn it by hand to keep the valve springs from sitting you will wipe the break in lube off and engine will eat the cam and lifters as soon as you   crank it.
Great to see you jump in and we have several members in deep ground up builds right now. One even attended the local technical school and took welding course. Doing a car is not rocket science but if you do not do it right nothing fit and you will have all kinds of issues and give up like so many do.

Food for thought.

Glad I know this now about the engine. I think now I'll be getting it all cleaned then waiting in oil until it's ready to be put back together. I don't think I'll be doing a ground up resto though. I definitely do not have any capability to do that equipment wise.

 

17 hours ago, Don C said:

I wouldn't start replacing your wheels before verifying it is a wheel. It easy to check the lateral and radial runout. You may have a bent rear axle. If you do have runout on a rear wheel, swap it for one from the front that has already passed the test, to see if the runout goes away. Then verify by measuring the runout on the axle flange, this will require a dial indicator.

Great info! I don't know much about runout but I'll definitely be looking into it.

73' H-code Convertible

351C 2V

FMX automatic

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I do not have the Ford manual in my hand. You can get a printed copy or a CD copy of the Ford shop manual that gives you all the specs for everything on the car. You can get from mustang supply houses, on ebay or amazon.

 

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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