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7 hours ago, Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs said:

Your are right on the Oxford but when they mixed it I watched them add black and other tints also. Was not just white. 

That is normal—paint manufacturers make toners with pigments.   The toners are mixed together to make a color.  Each paint manufacturer has different standards for their pigments and toners, so they don’t intermix.  So to match a factory color, there may be 950 units of white, but then the last 50 units are varied quantities yellow, black, orange, blue and purple. Some of those are the tiniest of bits of the mix, like 5 units.  

Back in the ‘70’s and into the 80’s you could buy what was called a factory pack, which was a color mixed by the paint company in the exact color you wanted.  The distributor pulled the can off the shelf and handed it to you.  Those days are over, now everything is toners, formulas, scales, spectrophotometry cameras, and variant decks.  Colors mixed at the shop or the paint store to the exact color you are asking for.  

My concern was pigment shift.  Over time colors change because raw materials drift from the standard over time and that creates variants to colors. I was (and still am) concerned that Wimbledon White was a grayer, whiter color originally.  However, as paint technology shifted, the paint companies had to match to something.  Their sample they chose had shifted, was poorly mixed/matched, or they “calculated the match” using an algorithm.  Having looked through the PPG formula references, the formula is the same for Envirobase for all years of Wimbledon White (I checked about 10 years of span).  But the outpouring of comments and photos here and that I have researched on my own has convinced me that it is typically ‘creamy’, although I have seen some that weren’t, camera and lighting can show a different story.  So who knows what’s right—I’m going to live with it until someone wants this car more than I do.

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1931 Ford Model A Station Wagon
1969 Mach 1 - 351C, TKO-600, 4WDB, R&P, A/C, Shaker, Fold Down, etc.
1972 Mach 1 - 351C, FMX, PDB, PS, A/C, Fold Down, Console
1996 Mustang Cobra Convertible - 10psi Procharger, 436rwhp

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I just painted my 73..now time to put her back together  

The blackout was sprayed on the rear underside of the hood on all 71-73 Mustangs. Ford felt that the open area created by the new cowl parking wipers was distracting and was treated to the blackout pa

Wimbledon White is an off white. Hard to tell from pics, but it looks about right to me. 

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David, I sure appreciate the "Use" of your hood. :o) I've had that one in my picture file for a while but could not remember where I found it. It's an excellent example of how the underhood blackout should look.

The different shades of white used by Ford (And the other manufactures) can be confusing to people not used to "Fifty Shades of White". I had never really paid much attention to it since very few of the Ford products my Dad owned were white. The first one, which was also our first Mustang, was a '66 Wimbledon white coupe which just looked....white! In 1974 he bought an LTD Brougham in Wimbledon that looked the same color as the Mustang. One day my uncle dropped by in a new F-150 that was "C" Pure White. All of a sudden the LTD now looked like a creamy pale light yellow.

It's sorta strange how the Big Three had drifted away from plain white to the "Designer" colors. I remember colors such as White Platinum Tri-coat Metallic, White Suede, Cream Brulee, to name a few. When the Crown Victoria replacing Taurus and Explorer Interceptor were released in 2012, there was no plain white in use on those vehicle lines. Ford had to release Oxford white back into those product lines since no fleet buyer wanted to pay $395.00 for designer colors!

I realize no matter what level of camera and equipment you possess when trying to show color samples here, they are only going to be close to the actual color. I just wanted to illustrate how Wimbledon white can take on a yellow hue when next to other white colors. The 9D, 9A, and M were common '60 and 70s colors. The 9L Oxford made an appearance in the '80s and shows how the other colors pick up their off white appearance.

 

paintx3.JPG

Steve

 

No Officer...I really don't know how fast I was going, my speedometer stopped at 140!

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I've had 2 vehicles that were Wimbledon White, a '64-1/2 Mustang coupe and a '64 F100, both were creamy., not grayish.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Hi, Here is a couple of things to consider. Higher priced clears use more expensive u/v screener that is crystal clear. The u/v screener in some clear has a yellow cast which is an issue in collision repair of white and light colored cars. Wimbledon white is creamy if you think what you have is too much so, maybe pick up a pint of another brand to compare.

 

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Secluff, thanks for posting the color chips.  My other point of reference is I used a white epoxy primer, which is bright white.  So spraying Wimbledon White on next to/over that makes the Wimbledon White look yellow in comparison.  

Keiths71–I opened up a fresh gallon of PPG EC520 clear, not cheap clear by any standard.  And no, it hasn’t been sitting on a shelf, I picked it up a few weeks ago.  It certainly didn’t change the appearance as I was surprised from the first coat of base.  It doesn’t even need to be a low end clear to be yellow though—I used to work for a “different” paint company a few years back and we constantly got complaints about the high end European brand’s clear being yellow.  If you re-read this you will figure out who my employer is now... ;-)

Thanks all for your input!!!

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1931 Ford Model A Station Wagon
1969 Mach 1 - 351C, TKO-600, 4WDB, R&P, A/C, Shaker, Fold Down, etc.
1972 Mach 1 - 351C, FMX, PDB, PS, A/C, Fold Down, Console
1996 Mustang Cobra Convertible - 10psi Procharger, 436rwhp

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I'm sorry I wasn't trying to imply anything. I was just putting out a contributing factor. Another one could be the person at the scale. I hope you get it to where you are happy with it.

 

 

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The more I work on it the more it is growing on me.  You all have convinced me that it is creamy.  I love the pictures people posted of cars, color chips and other things as that helped put my mind at ease.  That and the SWMBO said paint it...

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1931 Ford Model A Station Wagon
1969 Mach 1 - 351C, TKO-600, 4WDB, R&P, A/C, Shaker, Fold Down, etc.
1972 Mach 1 - 351C, FMX, PDB, PS, A/C, Fold Down, Console
1996 Mustang Cobra Convertible - 10psi Procharger, 436rwhp

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On 1/17/2021 at 3:08 PM, secluff said:

David, I sure appreciate the "Use" of your hood. :o) I've had that one in my picture file for a while but could not remember where I found it. It's an excellent example of how the underhood blackout should look.

The different shades of white used by Ford (And the other manufactures) can be confusing to people not used to "Fifty Shades of White". I had never really paid much attention to it since very few of the Ford products my Dad owned were white. The first one, which was also our first Mustang, was a '66 Wimbledon white coupe which just looked....white! In 1974 he bought an LTD Brougham in Wimbledon that looked the same color as the Mustang. One day my uncle dropped by in a new F-150 that was "C" Pure White. All of a sudden the LTD now looked like a creamy pale light yellow.

It's sorta strange how the Big Three had drifted away from plain white to the "Designer" colors. I remember colors such as White Platinum Tri-coat Metallic, White Suede, Cream Brulee, to name a few. When the Crown Victoria replacing Taurus and Explorer Interceptor were released in 2012, there was no plain white in use on those vehicle lines. Ford had to release Oxford white back into those product lines since no fleet buyer wanted to pay $395.00 for designer colors!

I realize no matter what level of camera and equipment you possess when trying to show color samples here, they are only going to be close to the actual color. I just wanted to illustrate how Wimbledon white can take on a yellow hue when next to other white colors. The 9D, 9A, and M were common '60 and 70s colors. The 9L Oxford made an appearance in the '80s and shows how the other colors pick up their off white appearance.

 

paintx3.JPG

I always did like the Wimbledon White for the very reason that it looks warmer compared to what most consider 'pure' white. Pure white reminds me of a refrigerator...appliance white that looks 'cheap' to me and usually looks like it has a blue tint when outside.  My 08 GT is Performance White and it seems to be right in the middle. Sometimes it looks a little warmer, sometimes a little cooler.

Also, keep in mind that if you are outside, reflected light will give a color cast. A yellow house or lots of green trees/grass with make any white look yellower.

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12 hours ago, Mustangdude said:

I just painted my 73..now time to put her back together

 

5E8D72E3-0B6B-45CB-A374-46DE8BCAF164.jpeg

B3B5D095-5887-48E4-A11E-B2EA5D17DCC3.jpeg

I would say, it looks very good - I like it :thumb:

Tim

 

Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly :runninpony:

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