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It’s just habit....


7173Vert
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Funny how you approach a new acquisition in the same manner every time.... I’ll just clean a few things up in the engine bay, I told myself... Ha, wound up removing most of it... This engine has never really been touched, definitely has never been apart to this extent before. I will clean the grime off everything and reassemble. Not going to paint anything, just leave it natural, but clean. The 73’s sure did get a lot of emission crap, and this one has the California Emission option also. I will keep it all intact. 
 

Interesting connection on the original alternator.... Why did Ford do this? It’s on their pretty secure. I’m not going to do try and remove this time, as I took the wire harness at the Alternator/ voltage regulator and starter solenoid off for cleaning. I’ll just leave it attached to the alternator.
 

The extent of top end part removal will allow me to clean the engine and bay nicely as well as all the small parts I removed. This car has become a major project, as I have all the interior out at the moment also. Glad, I finished everything under the car, but this will take some time to get back to the level of clean I seek.

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Edited by 7173Vert
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"Yes dear", has kept me in the hobby a long time...

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Looks like someone before you cleaned a little too much. The R.H. valve cover in 1973 has the code for how the engine was set up. If the valve covers had been swapped you would see the Calibration sticker which is on the L.H. valve cover. I have never found the right one to replace on my California 73 Vert. They have some but not the right one for mine.
On the pollution it was not that much just the EGR plate and valve. All the other temp operated vacuum changes were to try to eliminate pollution in start up does not really effect how it runs that much. The smaller intake valve and the cam timing and compression down is what kills the 73.
I did not paint my engine when I had it out just the oil pan it had sat 2" from the ground for 37 years so was very rusty outside. No rust inside the engine. Just pulled the pan and covers and looked to be sure.
Here is pic of the sticker on my Q code 4 speed not California spec but most will be similar on the sticker. When I took the alternator off there were several OK stamps with I guess employee initials. Some grease pencil marks on bell housing and intake A7 and some on valve covers. I did spray some satin clear on the bare metal places to slow up the rust. It is a survivor and never restored. Looks like that is the direction you are headed also. They are only original once and then just another restored Mustang.
Surprised that core plugs were not leaking but I did not change them.

 

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When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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As to why the push on connection, it's a matter of time is money, much faster to push on a connector than start a nut and then run it down on the threads and wrench it tight.

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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1 hour ago, Don C said:

As to why the push on connection, it's a matter of time is money, much faster to push on a connector than start a nut and then run it down on the threads and wrench it tight.

Was this a one time use? Ie. Remove it and you may not get it to connect as well again? That is why I chose not to remove it, didn’t want to take the chance... Looking at it, to try and resecure it after you pry it loose, would require a special round clamping plier of some kind. I get the cost savings aspect, yet, they used a nut and washer on two of the other connections on the alternator. Have to wonder about their thinking back in the day sometimes. Lol

"Yes dear", has kept me in the hobby a long time...

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs said:

Looks like someone before you cleaned a little too much. The R.H. valve cover in 1973 has the code for how the engine was set up. If the valve covers had been swapped you would see the Calibration sticker which is on the L.H. valve cover. I have never found the right one to replace on my California 73 Vert. They have some but not the right one for mine.
On the pollution it was not that much just the EGR plate and valve. All the other temp operated vacuum changes were to try to eliminate pollution in start up does not really effect how it runs that much. The smaller intake valve and the cam timing and compression down is what kills the 73.
I did not paint my engine when I had it out just the oil pan it had sat 2" from the ground for 37 years so was very rusty outside. No rust inside the engine. Just pulled the pan and covers and looked to be sure.
Here is pic of the sticker on my Q code 4 speed not California spec but most will be similar on the sticker. When I took the alternator off there were several OK stamps with I guess employee initials. Some grease pencil marks on bell housing and intake A7 and some on valve covers. I did spray some satin clear on the bare metal places to slow up the rust. It is a survivor and never restored. Looks like that is the direction you are headed also. They are only original once and then just another restored Mustang.
Surprised that core plugs were not leaking but I did not change them.

 

DSC_0944.JPG

DSC_0946.JPG

DSC_0949.JPG

DSC_0955.JPG

DSC_0956.JPG

DSC_0957.JPG

DSC_0968.JPG

DSC_0969.JPG

I don’t think it was cleaning it, more, just age and heat fried it over time. This was and Oakland CA car. Yes, just a plate and egr valve, but with added AC and California emissions.... This car probably has as much emission stuff, hoses, etc as you could get on one of our car’s. I’ve labelled everything, so it will go back together. I also noticed this metal tag attached below the Engine calibration label on the right valve cover. I haven’t checked the 73 Service Manual yet, but a quick check online shows another engine with the same tag (it is the one in the picture without the intake manifold). That engine is similar to mine, a California 73 Q Code version. I also noted that on the passenger side door jamb, behind the inner front plastic shield where the antenna is; there is an ambient sensor installed. My research shows this as part of the emission system (California?) and was connected to the distributor to control vacuum at low speeds or upon initial startup. Anyway, I revert back to all the emission stuff noted on this particular engine...I will clean up the original alternator, see what is on it. The starter was original also, but the engaging drive teeth are showing wear, so I will have to get it rebuilt. As far as I can tell, the flywheel teeth are still ok. I broke off two of the vacuum tee ports on the vacuum unit installed in the water pump... Damn it. I’ll have to search out a replacement. No real surprises so far, so, we’ll take it 48 years later...

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Edited by 7173Vert

"Yes dear", has kept me in the hobby a long time...

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13 hours ago, 7173Vert said:

Funny how you approach a new acquisition in the same manner every time.... I’ll just clean a few things up in the engine bay, I told myself... Ha, wound up removing most of it... This engine has never really been touched, definitely has never been apart to this extent before. I will clean the grime off everything and reassemble. Not going to paint anything, just leave it natural, but clean. The 73’s sure did get a lot of emission crap, and this one has the California Emission option also. I will keep it all intact. 
 

Interesting connection on the original alternator.... Why did Ford do this? It’s on their pretty secure. I’m not going to do try and remove this time, as I took the wire harness at the Alternator/ voltage regulator and starter solenoid off for cleaning. I’ll just leave it attached to the alternator.
 

The extent of top end part removal will allow me to clean the engine and bay nicely as well as all the small parts I removed. This car has become a major project, as I have all the interior out at the moment also. Glad, I finished everything under the car, but this will take some time to get back to the level of clean I seek.

879A359F-9F25-40EA-8063-612B9F6CBA71.jpeg

7D227542-BB41-45A7-90CE-2D9C6268AA24.jpeg

3F67F0C4-DD60-4FA9-A971-8078B94E4FDF.jpeg

Ken, 

very interesting! Do you also have a 70 Amp Alternator? I have the original one still on my car, it is an 70 Amp one because of my rear defrost. But I cannot remind such a connection - my wire harness attaches on the top of the alternator. 

Which engine/transmission-combination do you have? I cannot recall at the moment... 

I had the same problem with the ported vacuum switch. Since yours is a three way I assume you have a dual distributor as well ? Years ago I bought a new one on ebay, as I remind it was this one 

https://www.ebay.de/itm/Ported-Vacuum-Switch-Standard-Motor-Products-PVS14/124638265878?epid=115079394&hash=item1d05050216:g:9KwAAOSwURheQ0LP

But I do not know for sure anymore - please measure the thread to be sure. There are others as well if you search for "ported vacuum switch". Many are not labeled for a 73 Mustang but they are of the same fit and funcionality. Maybe the typical 1973 Mustang thing with all it's year-special accesoires... 

 

 

Tim

 

Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly :runninpony:

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3 minutes ago, timachone said:

Ken, 

very interesting! Do you also have a 70 Amp Alternator? I have the original one still on my car, it is an 70 Amp one because of my rear defrost. But I cannot remind such a connection - my wire harness attaches on the top of the alternator. 

Which engine/transmission-combination do you have? I cannot recall at the moment... 

I had the same problem with the ported vacuum switch. Since yours is a three way I assume you have a dual distributor as well ? Years ago I bought a new one on ebay, as I remind it was this one 

https://www.ebay.de/itm/Ported-Vacuum-Switch-Standard-Motor-Products-PVS14/124638265878?epid=115079394&hash=item1d05050216:g:9KwAAOSwURheQ0LP

But I do not know for sure anymore - please measure the thread to be sure. There are others as well if you search for "ported vacuum switch". Many are not labeled for a 73 Mustang but they are of the same fit and funcionality. Maybe the typical 1973 Mustang thing with all it's year-special accesoires... 

 

 

Tim. Mine is a 55 amp Motorcraft alternator.  It is a 73 Q Code 4-spd car. Yes, a dual point and dual diaphragm distributor. Thanks for the tips on the vacuum switch. I have a couple spares. so I will check those first once I remove it from the engine. I could have avoided breaking it, just a little to rough on the first hose. The second break was on purpose lol... 

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"Yes dear", has kept me in the hobby a long time...

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