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Engine help in San Antonio, TX


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Hey everybody,

It's been awhile since I have posted anything.   A year ago I pulled the engine (351C v2) out of my 72 hardtop as the car went off to get painted.  It was a running engine at the time so I was just planning on cleaning it up and getting a fresh coat of paint on it,  However, (there always seems to be a "however")  as I was cleaning it I noticed gaskets coming apart and other worrisome signs so I started breaking things down.  In the long run the block, pistons, and heads all went to the machine shop.  I have it all back now and all of the new parts I and throwing at it ready and waiting.    However, I'm a noobe and have never built and engine before.  I have a step by step book and other info but I'm a bit nervous.  Is there anyone in the area willing to give me a day of their time to help a guy out.

My garage is air conditioned if that helps.  :biggrin:  I live on the northwest side of town near the medical center.

 

Just got the car back from paint also.  Here are a couple pics.

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Blessed are those who can laugh at themselves, for they shall never cease to be amused.

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If no qualified volunteer comes forward I suggest you find an engine builder, familiar with 351Cs, to build the short block. If that isn't possible, use the Ford shop manuals and check everything 2 or 3 times. Replace the rod bolt nuts with ARP, or equivalent, and torque them to 2/3 spec 3 times to burnish the threads so you get accurate torque readings at final torque, using a good assembly lube. Pre-lube the engine, get distributor in right, set rocker arms right, have the carb filled before trying to start it. Cooling system full. Use oil with high ZDDP in it, preferably a break in oil. The goal is to have the engine start quickly, without several attempted starts, to minimize the risk of damaging a cam lobe(s). Have timing light available to set timing after it starts. Run it for 20 minutes or so at 2000 RPM, occasionally easy revs to 4000 to seat the rings (have a good fan in front of the car). Hopefully someone local can help you. Chuck

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In addition to what is mentioned above, do you have the tools for the engine build?  Besides the basic hand tools you need an engine stand, torque wrench, and ring compressor.  Are the cam bearings installed?  Are you going to degree the cam?  Do you have a ring filer to gap the piston rings?  Assembling an engine isn't difficult if you have a good manual, take your time, pay attention to detail, and seek help here on the forum if you have questions.  Messing up a build is easy, too, if you don't do these things.

Edited by Sheriff41
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13 hours ago, c9zx said:

If no qualified volunteer comes forward I suggest you find an engine builder, familiar with 351Cs, to build the short block. If that isn't possible, use the Ford shop manuals and check everything 2 or 3 times. Replace the rod bolt nuts with ARP, or equivalent, and torque them to 2/3 spec 3 times to burnish the threads so you get accurate torque readings at final torque, using a good assembly lube. Pre-lube the engine, get distributor in right, set rocker arms right, have the carb filled before trying to start it. Cooling system full. Use oil with high ZDDP in it, preferably a break in oil. The goal is to have the engine start quickly, without several attempted starts, to minimize the risk of damaging a cam lobe(s). Have timing light available to set timing after it starts. Run it for 20 minutes or so at 2000 RPM, occasionally easy revs to 4000 to seat the rings (have a good fan in front of the car). Hopefully someone local can help you. Chuck

Great advice as always Chuck!  

Just one thing to add, if you replace the rod bolts you MUST have the big ends of the rods resized to maintain proper bearing clearance and crush. The bolts help to align the rod caps. 

[align=left]Jeff T.

 

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passengers. [/align]

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I suggested changing the rod bolt nuts, not the bolts. The OEM nuts are a known failure item. Chuck

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If you have the "How to Rebuild Ford V8 engines" by Tom Monroe, that's really all you need. If you follow the step by step process, you really can't go wrong. I rebuilt my first engine in the parking lot of my college apartment with nothing more than basic hand tools and that book. 

 

 

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