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 I've never had a project car


DryCreekNurse
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Don is spot on with the books.  I have all the ones he listed and find myself looking at the assembly manuals most often.  If you disassemble the car take a lot of pictures and save them in multiple places.  I had a ton of pics on my encrypted work phone.  My youngest decided at about 5 years old that she was going to play games on my work phone.  After multiple wrong passcodes the phone wiped itself clean.  I lost my pics and learned a lesson. 

On the subject of shopping for paint / body folks.  It is tricky, 90% if shops want nothing to do with restoration work.  I suggest going to some car shows within 100 miles of you, and walking around looking for the nicest paint.  Strike up some conversations and find out who did the work, when they did it and if they would use them again.  In your case you will need some pretty serious metal replacement so finding someone skilled in that will be a must.  Be prepared to sell a kidney.

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1 hour ago, Don C said:

A set of Shop Manuals (5 volumes plus wiring diagrams) would be the first one I would get. Even if you don't plan on doing all of the work yourself it is a good reference to make sure whoever is doing the work isn't blowing smoke when they tell you what needs to be done.

While a set of Assembly Manuals are a great reference for reassembling your car, taking pictures of the tear-down are even better. The illustrations in them are a good reference as well as some of the detailed instructions on how some things go together.

The Parts Manuals are also a good reference, especially the illustrations, which show exploded views of the parts.

Hard copies of the manuals are available, repro from vendors, originals from eBay sometimes. Electronic (pdf) versions of all of them are also available from vendors.

SHOP MANUAL, PRINTED, 1971 FORD MERCURY CAR - #L-27A - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com)

SHOP MANUAL, 1971 - #L-SM-71C - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com)

The colorized version of the wiring is nice, but not necessary, the wiring diagrams are available on this forum in the Wiki section.

WIRE DIAGRAMS, 1971 - #L-WD-71A - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com)

CD, FACTORY ASSEMBLY MANUALS, 1971-1973, 6 VOLUME SET - #L-FAM-7173A - National Parts Depot (npdlink.com)

Ford eBook Downloads 3 (factoryrepairmanuals.com)

If you don't have one, the owners manual is also nice to have, also available from many of the vendors in hard copy.

By the way, welcome from Oregon.

Heck yeah, this is exactly what I want to know. I don’t want to spend $80 on a set of vintage service manuals online only to find out they’re not going to be helpful. My public library card went to an online format, I’m trying to get my card to work in the new system. 

I picked up a new 3-ring binder, it’s fabulous and I love it.

 F5AA28C3-1A50-4BDD-B32A-2938A613EDC1.thumb.jpeg.885aadcd421fd255e08cc8ffe28b6aa0.jpeg

My spouse is at drill today, so I’m watching Game of Thrones and working on an excel workbook for parts. 
 

Painting is probably the only part I’m not sweating over. I hauled it down to my uncle’s place, he’s a painter.
I didn’t ask him if he’d do it, I asked him if he’d teach me. I said, “You’re gonna croak someday, and I need you to pass your wisdom down.” He said I have to come over and help him with his roof tomorrow. I’d love to learn how to spray, I’d paint everything if I knew how. 
 

 

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Big welcome and nice project to have  :beer:

 

My first piece of advice is the base 3 ...

  1. Make a list of all the jobs 
  2. Try and list out all the things each job will require 
  3. Cost it out - and prepare a budget 

From these basic steps one can prioritise and plan :wrench: to take on the mountain of work one piece at a time. 

And in these forums - no question is a dumb question :help:- loads of people here with a wealth of experience ...don't be afraid to ask :thumb:

 

sig2.jpg

Enjoy's searching out 71-73 history

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One thing to remember/decide, not every car has to be a 100 point show quality restoration. There is much more interest these days in cars with 'patina'. There are two benefits to this, one is that you don't have to rob a bank and the other is that an imperfect driver is not as anxiety inducing as an expensive resto. A good mechanical restoration of the drivetrain, suspension, brakes and fixing any rust issues can be done in steps as time and money permit. Even the interior can be done. Body and paint, potentially the priciest part,  can be decided later, while you enjoy driving it.

Edited by detritusmaximus
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First, sorry for your loss but it is special that you have such regard for your friend after all these years.

Second...welcome from MO!

Last.....listen to the folks here. Restoring a car is painstaking and, at times, frustrating. Set your expectations for what you want it to be when you are done. My restoration started 26 yrs ago and languished for a good portion of it. I hope u can keep your car inside or at least under a roof with concrete or a vapor barrier underneath it. Ask questions here. It looks like some members are sorta close by. Go to some local car shows and find similar cars. Strike up a conversation with those owners. Look for a local or regional Mustang or Ford club. In a year or two you will have a few local folks. I have a few around me that are on this forum. More pics are always welcome and there are no stupid questions (only arrogant answers)

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Wisdom, knowledge and intelligence are three very different things.

1971 convertible, H-code, Ram Air

1971 Mach I, M-code, Ram Air

1972 Mexican GT-351

1988 Bronco II

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I’ve been carefully pulling up carpet and looking inside the dash with sniper mirrors hoping to find a secret hidden build sheet. 
Like Nicolas Cage on some kind of motor city treasure hunt. 

Then today Marti museum sent me an email about my VIN matching the Lois Eminger records. 

What in Great Odin’s beard, they just have boxes of old paperwork that a plant worker pulled out a dumpster 50 years ago? I’ve been trying to wrap my head around the idea that someone had the foresight to save this paperwork. 

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On 9/11/2021 at 7:25 PM, detritusmaximus said:

One thing to remember/decide, not every car has to be a 100 point show quality restoration. There is much more interest these days in cars with 'patina'. There are two benefits to this, one is that you don't have to rob a bank and the other is that an imperfect driver is not as anxiety inducing as an expensive resto. A good mechanical restoration of the drivetrain, suspension, brakes and fixing any rust issues can be done in steps as time and money permit. Even the interior can be done. Body and paint, potentially the priciest part,  can be decided later, while you enjoy driving it.

In my experience, 99% of them are less then a 100 point restoration. These are one of the toughest car’s to restore back to factory, so the majority choose not too. Hat’s off to those who take on this difficult challenge to try and preserve the original history of some these car’s…

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"Yes dear", has kept me in the hobby a long time...

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Welcome and my sincere condolences for the loss of a friend. 

 

This site has been incredibly helpful in our restoration. I could not be where we are without this site and all the great wisdom that is shared. All the vendors here are top notch.

A big help before our Mach 1 was started was reading through many of the builds. Tips were stored away for later, ideas for planning out the stages really popped out and frustrations put my mind at ease, knowing I'm not the only one that can have a bad day in the garage.

Don't get locked into a timeline for completion (stuff happens). Remember the good times with your friend and the Mustang. Hang onto the vision you dream about no matter how tough some days are with your restoration. Yes, pictures, lots of them. Ziploc bags and a sharpee are a must for parts that come off.

Good luck and wrench well.....

Brett

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Welcome from west Michigan! Before you go wild buying parts, what do you really want to do with the car? There's no sense in building a 500 horse engine to drive to the Whippy Dip on Saturday nights. These can be great road cars (mine is) and handle real well with just a few inexpensive mods. 

[align=left]Jeff T.

 

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passengers. [/align]

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2 hours ago, droptop73 said:

Welcome from west Michigan! Before you go wild buying parts, what do you really want to do with the car? There's no sense in building a 500 horse engine to drive to the Whippy Dip on Saturday nights. These can be great road cars (mine is) and handle real well with just a few inexpensive mods. 

Hey there’s  nothing wrong with 500+ hp to go get ice cream!! Lol. 
Thats  where my car gets drove most. 

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Kevin
1971 Mach 1

408C Stroker - C4 w/3,000 stall - 8.8" Rear w/3.73's - Disc brakes all way around.

 

 

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Sorry to here about the passing of your friend.

What started out as a front end rebuild, heater core, quick paint job turned into ten years 25k and it's still not done. Project cars snowball.

IMG_2829.JPG

- Mike

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