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Recommendations needed for a front drum to front disk conversion kit.


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Guys,

I have a H code (351 2v / FMX Auto) with factory drum front and rear brakes.

I'm looking to convert the front to disk brakes and looking for a complete conversion kit that includes a booster that looks as close as possible to the factory 9" booster.

I have found this kit from Master Power Brakes. - https://www.mpbrakes.com/front-brake-conversion-kit/1972-ford-mustang-legend-series-front.asp?catid=8BD4041A924D4A01B66208D7A8EADADA

Has any one use this kit? It looks to be complete and uses the drum spindles.

Any issues?

Any other recommendations for other kits? 

The alternative is a Scott Drake kit. https://www.cjponyparts.com/scott-drake-front-power-disc-brake-conversion-kit-automatic-transmission-v8-mustang-1971-1973/p/DBCA134A/

This one looks very much like the MP Brakes kit.

The car is a driver. Not a racer. So single piston callipers is all I need.

 

Thoughts?

Edited by bdennis
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See if Don at Ohio Mustang or Mike at Motor City Mustang have disk brake spindles. Then buy the calipers, hubs, and rotors. Get a new booster from CJ.

Master Power BM15224-1 Mustang Brake Booster Conversion Kit 1971-1973 (cjponyparts.com)

If you're planning on larger wheels you could get the conversion kit from Mustang Steve and use newer Mustang calipers

Front Disc Brake Conversion Brackets Archives - Mustang Steve

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“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

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Thanks guys.

Looks like the Booster kit from CJ Pony Parts is from MP Brakes. So same / same..

I plan on staying with either 14" or 15" wheels. So no big calipers or disks needed.

Its just a cruiser not a racer. So std calipers are going to be fine.

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+1 on Don at Ohio Mustang or Mike at Motorcity Mustang.  Both could probably hook you up with the spindles for disc conversion and the pedal assembly under the dash.  I used a 72 vert for parts for all my conversion. 

Kevin
1971 Mach 1

408C Stroker - C4 w/3,000 stall - 8.8" Rear w/3.73's - Disc brakes all way around.

 

 

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No it don’t have to change if you keep the same drum manual master cylinder. But if you want to go to power disc brakes then yes you need to swap out the pedal. I kept the under dash bracket and pedal from the 72 I took all the parts from. I haven’t swapped that in yet but hopefully this winter I will get to that. I have been running my drum master cylinder for probably 10 years with disc brakes and haven’t had any trouble.  It takes a little bit of pushing on the pedal to stop but no worse than drum. 

Kevin
1971 Mach 1

408C Stroker - C4 w/3,000 stall - 8.8" Rear w/3.73's - Disc brakes all way around.

 

 

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Kevin,
Thanks for the update. Its interesting that none of the kits that are sold either from CJ Pony, Scott Drake or MPBrakes have a replacement pedal.

Given they don't come with one, I did not think a replacement was needed.

Thoughts?

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I believe those ones have you drill a hole in your existing pedal at a higher point up and mount a new pin. I’m not 100% sure but that’s what I remember reading. 

Kevin
1971 Mach 1

408C Stroker - C4 w/3,000 stall - 8.8" Rear w/3.73's - Disc brakes all way around.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Progress update on my drum to disk conversion.

I have now replaced the upper and lower control arms.

Rebuilt some local falcon Aluminium Girlock single piston callipers and installed them with new disks.

20211112_191139.thumb.jpg.42596221745127827c58fd24c108e1f3.jpg20211112_191206.thumb.jpg.3f118424ef0ff64f78572c2ef02a570f.jpg

20211113_134823.thumb.jpg.1cd03cc063853cfb6ed8acc799a6f175.jpg

I am now up to installing the new booster and master cylinder that a local mustang parts supplier sources from Leedbrakes in the US.. (Im in Australia).

Booster.jpg.d75c42a789d45d502d8c2b7e4de8f2a8.jpg

I now have an issue with the booster as the connecting rod does not connect to the old brake pedal (Factory drum brake car with no booster).

20211114_170625.thumb.jpg.dd0a1afa314921d6deac0f92853ee2fb.jpg

 

it was suggested that I did not need to replace the pedal.

I now know I need to..

The question is.. Is the 67 to 70 pedal the same as a 71 to 73 as scott drake dont have a power brake pedal replacement for a 71 to 73.??

 

 

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Pedals are different between the generations. 

A simple solution is to have a new pin welded into your existing pedal. I should have a power pedal I can measure if you decide to go that route. 

 

 

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If you aren't hung up on going power, you can use a 74 Maverick master Cylinder set up for a front disc/rear drum setup,keep, your existing distribution block, and splice a small residual valve into the rear brake line. The maverick setup was designed to provide good braking capability for a manual disc/drum car. Plus - you don't have to mess with relocating the MC, pulling the brake pedal, and it minimizes the "plumbing" work required.

I did this with my 71 Mach (it was factory manual drums) and it works great. Stopping fast doesn't require a lot of leg strength - I was surprised at how effective this setup is.

 

Black 1971 Mach 1

351C/FMX/TrickFlow Heads/Lunati Retro Roller Conversion

Classic Auto AC, Manual Front Discs, Upgraded Springs/Shocks/Close-Ratio Steering

 

IMG-2977.jpg

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When I did my disc conversion, I bought a "kit" from Mustang Steve. The new pin is set 2" lower. Here's a pic of my converted pedal arm. You will need to remove the lower bolts as seen in the 2nd pic. I also removed the column as it make the booster installation much easier. Beside a great time to clean it up and add a new firewall seal. At this time I removed the pedal bracket and added Mustang Steve's clutch bearing kit along with bronze bushings at the linkage points. (I have a 4 speed of course!!)

The back brakes have a variable control valve, arrowed. Originally, I ran my car for several years with manual disc/drums before I got around to adding the booster, and to be honest, there was not a lot of difference.

IMG_0608.1.JPG

IMG_0603.1.JPG

IMG_0605_LI.1.jpg

Edited by Stanglover
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Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Guys, Thanks for the update. I will probably go down the route of adding the extra pin to the pedal.

I installed the new booster with the pedal installed and marked with a sharpie there the pedal intersects and it is around 2 inches. 

I don't have a welder, but have a engineering place near me so will go and see them this morning.

I assume then that the 67-70 pedal is different so wont go down that path.

In terms of install, the original pedal box had captive nuts on the mount on the inside of the car that could not be removed. So I drilled out the holes to enable the bolts on the booster to pass through and then add the nuts on the inside of the car to hold it in place.

At this point, I don't plan on adding a proportioning valve, but will see how it goes and if the back end locks up will add later. Thats a simple addition.

Thanks for your help.

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I should add to my post, that I did not change the proportioning valve either. The SSBC disc brake kit I chose to use came with the adjustable valve, so in effect, the block is just a connection for the front lines. The rears are plugged off and the M/C rear brake line goes directly to the valve seen in the pic (arrowed). Downside is there is no warning light working on my dash. Oh well, after having 2 total brake failures in my life, the little red light would be the last thing to worry about.

Edit; I might also mention I fabricated a (compound angled) bracket to mount the adj. valve. The kit did not have any sort of fixing, just had the valve "hanging" in the lines.

Edited by Stanglover
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Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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When I installed my front disc brake kit and brake booster, I used the original non-power brake pedal and drilled a hole at the 2 inch mark below and used a stud that came with the kit. Drilling the hole was not that hard, just use good drill bits. You may be able to find the new stud online at Leeds or another reputable parts store.  Good luck.

Tom

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Thanks for the updates guys.

 

Tom. Thanks for the update. Yes if I could get the stud from Leeds that would be ideal. I have messaged them.

 

I'm checking locally to see if anyone has a pedal that will work.

Does anyone have a pedal they could measure the total length and spacing between the top  and the pin and the total length.

I know the 67-70 one is not correct and is longer and wont work.

 

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I just took a re-look at my front disc brakes and they are the Wilwood brand, they went on very easy and instructions were great. For the booster, I bought the combo kit with the master cylinder, no surprises there as well, quality looked great and the instructions were well laid out and informative. My kit had the "stud" for moving the pivot point if reusing the non-power brake pedal. 

Tom

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Thanks Tom.

Im doing a mixed install. A booster and master cylinder from Leedbrakes and local (Australian 1986 Falcon) front spindles and Girlock aluminium callipers. Mainly to enable getting new pads much easier than having to get them from the US when they wear out.

 

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About the "pin" Do you have a local machine shop or know someone with a lathe? It would be very simple to make one. Just copy the original for size/length. The hard part is cross drilling the split pin hole, but that doesn't have to be dead on the center line. Material only needs to be CRS. It could either be weld in or made with a (3/8") thread, nut and lock washer.

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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Geoff, Yep, I have a local engineering company that can do the work for me. Just need to wait a week or so for them to clear other work before mine. It would take them no more than 30 min to do I would expect.

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13 hours ago, bdennis said:

Geoff, Yep, I have a local engineering company that can do the work for me. Just need to wait a week or so for them to clear other work before mine. It would take them no more than 30 min to do I would expect.

Great, still quicker than shipping from the US. 

Geoff.

 I learn something new every day!

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On 11/14/2021 at 7:12 PM, vintageman said:

When I installed my front disc brake kit and brake booster, I used the original non-power brake pedal and drilled a hole at the 2 inch mark below and used a stud that came with the kit. Drilling the hole was not that hard, just use good drill bits. You may be able to find the new stud online at Leeds or another reputable parts store.  Good luck.

Tom

I installed a Leed Brakes conversion kit a couple of years ago. Had to drill the hole in the original pedal and use the supplied stud. I've had no issues at all.  I don't see the stud on their website but they may sell one separately. Give them, a call: 1-716-852-2139. 

Mike

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