Jump to content

3rd member install recommendations


Recommended Posts

I dropped off my 3rd member today for its rebuild, so now it's time to prep for its return.

Are there any step by step tutorials?  I mean I know the process,  but I would like details like gasket or sealant, what parts can or should not be reused, stuff like that. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Step-by-step installation instructions can be found in volume one of the shop manual, section 4 of Chapter 15-10.

You can use The Right Stuff gasket maker in lieu of a regular gasket:

Permatex® the Right Stuff® Gasket Maker – BLACK – Permatex

 

 

“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

--Albert Einstein

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's pretty straight forward.  Clean the housing out as best you can.  If you have welding skills you could weld in a drain bung.  You'll probably want to change the gear oil after 500 to 1,000 miles and the drain will make the job easier.  The gasket maker Don mentioned is used on all the newer cars, just be sure to follow the directions closely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I did my 66, it leaked like an SOB despite the proper gasket and crust washers.  Turned out the housing was very warped, and I needed a very thick gasket indeed.  While your 3rd member is out, check for trueness across the housing opening.  And clean, clean, clean the housing!

  • Like 1

Let me check your shorts!

http://midlifeharness.com

cactus.jpg.92e5d9d8700abc0ed60c8ccb3426248e.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You should include a supply of new copper washers for the stud nuts.   Also, get a friend to help lift the unit into position.

 

Permatex Gear Oil RTV Sealant (3 oz.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In regards to lifting back into place, I'll be solo.   Has anyone every tried using a "cradle" to lift?  I was thinking to build something out of wood to support the front and back, set that on a jack to get it up into position.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used a floor jack to lift the chunk up while I steady it. Kinda tricky using one leg to operate the jack, though!  Once in position you'll need to get it straight on the studs to slide it home. 

Edited by Sheriff41
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Funny enough I'm actually doing the same job today and am wondering the same. Didn't wanna hassle with dropping the housing, so I'll have to find a way to lift it up solo as well

PSX_20211008_135156.jpg

Plain Jane | 1971 F Code Coupe 302/C4 Automatic

Goin' to Town Rig | 1971 F100 Ranger XLT LWB 390FE/C6 Automatic

Commuter | 2018 Tesla Model 3 Midrange RWD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe if you have a welder (which I don't).  I'll have to go the wood way. Maybe I can rigged some tie-downs to keep it balanced.  If and when I figure it out, I'll post some pics.    Won't be till sometime next week though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Sheriff41 said:

I've used a floor jack to lift the chunk up while I steady it. Kinda tricky using one leg to operate the jack, though!  Once in position you'll need to get it straight on the studs to slide it home. 

Exactly. I have done it with a floor jack and leg operation a few times. I have always placed wood blocks around the floor jack and keep my face away in case it slides out. However, if you have a jack with a big flat base, or just make one, and the use of your hands to steady it, it should work.

Edited by tony-muscle

20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg

 

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump

Strange center section with Truetrac, 3.5 gear and 31 spline axles, 4-wheel disc brakes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ended up affixing an old flex plate on the floor jack, and the setting the chunk on top of it to lift it into position. Worked pretty good.

Plain Jane | 1971 F Code Coupe 302/C4 Automatic

Goin' to Town Rig | 1971 F100 Ranger XLT LWB 390FE/C6 Automatic

Commuter | 2018 Tesla Model 3 Midrange RWD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got my 3rd member back from the gear shop today.   New Strange 3.25 gearset, trackloc clutch plates, bearing.  Suggest non-synthetic and change at 500 miles.  Also suggested RTV (no gasket).  He also said that with the RTV there was no need for the copper washers (only needed when using a gasket).  He also suggested to drill and tap a drain plug.

So, now I need to confirm my yoke size and order new u joints.   

Also need axle bearing and seals (should have done that earlier).   Or could/should I hold off until the 500 mi change?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, MooseStang said:

Got my 3rd member back from the gear shop today.   New Strange 3.25 gearset, trackloc clutch plates, bearing.  Suggest non-synthetic and change at 500 miles.  Also suggested RTV (no gasket).  He also said that with the RTV there was no need for the copper washers (only needed when using a gasket).  He also suggested to drill and tap a drain plug.

So, now I need to confirm my yoke size and order new u joints.   

Also need axle bearing and seals (should have done that earlier).   Or could/should I hold off until the 500 mi change?

Congrats!  Did your builder say anything about adding friction modifier to the gear oil?  The clutches need that.

I'd recommend changing the bearings and seals now.  Swab out the axle tubes to get any old debris out of them so it doesn't contaminate your new parts.  I buy several cans of brake clean and spray the axle tubes.  An old bed sheet you can tear into swabs, and a broom handle to push them through the housing works well.  Spray, swab, spray and swab usually does the job.

If you drill and tap, use a 1/4" NPT or 3/8" NPT plug.  Use a thread sealer (Permatex No. 2 non-hardening) or thread tape on the plug's threads.  A weld-on bung would be better, though.

Edited by Sheriff41
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He suggested first to run a magnet through the tubes, then use a piece of pvc pipe with rags and brake cleaner.  Yes, he did remind me about the additive.  I'll probably go back there and get my bearings pressed on, unless I can find someplace closer and maybe cheaper.  He quoted me $30 per axle,  not sure if that covers parts,  probably not. 

I may have just found another issue though.  There's a chip out of the outer edge of my front slip.  How bad does this look?

 

20211015_213117.jpg

20211015_213208.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it were mine I would replace it.  You don't know if there is more damage than what you can see plus the damage it could cause if it was to fail. You can pick up a  new one for around $100.  I think the money would be well spent.  It's what I call one of those "Insurance Policies" pieces.  

Kilgon

 

 

"The only dumb question is the one not asked"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd replace that yoke as well. 

FWIW, take a trip to Harbor Freight, or check various for sale listings and get your own shop press to do the bearings yourself. $60 is almost halfway to a new 12 ton unit, which is more than enough for home use. 

https://www.harborfreight.com/12-ton-shop-press-33497.html

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decided to let the shop that did my 3rd also do my rear bearings.  Supposed to pick them up tomorrow.  Also getting new Spicer ujoints from OReilly's tomorrow.   Hopefully, I'll put everything back together this weekend.   I still need to order a new slip yoke when I figure out a source.  I asked the gear shop guy about the slip yoke, which he referred me to a driveshaft guy way on the other side of town.  Apparently, he's also the only one around that does balancing.   He also said there should be a plug in the end of the slip yoke to prevent oil seepage.  I don't remember there being one when I remove it.   Is there supposed to be one?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, the u-joint end of the yoke should be plugged.  I didn't notice that in the photos until you mentioned it.  I use Denny's for my drive line parts. https://www.dennysdriveshaft.com/c121_transmission_slip_yokes.html  There are many others but I've had good service from Denny's.

Looks like those yokes are in high demand!  If you can find a drive shaft out of a 5-speed Fox Mustang, it looks like they use the same yoke as the 28-spline top loader.

Edited by Sheriff41
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...