Any way to close ram air flappers

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I have looked at many posts on the ram air flappers/operation, etc.   Needless to say I, like many, have non working flappers that now remain open due to the vacuum controlled actuators.   I would like to keep them closed if I have to drive in the rain, any way to do that without using the block off plates I see for sale?  If not I am thinking of making some sort of insert that would block opening but be removable very easily, has anyone done that?

 

danoreilly

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I have looked at many posts on the ram air flappers/operation, etc.   Needless to say I, like many, have non working flappers that now remain open due to the vacuum controlled actuators.   I would like to keep them closed if I have to drive in the rain, any way to do that without using the block off plates I see for sale?  If not I am thinking of making some sort of insert that would block opening but be removable very easily, has anyone done that?
The block off plates were actually more for aesthetics than functionality (not leaving a big ugly hole).  Even a functional ram air system (I have one) will allow water in under normal conditions, but not in sufficient quantity to cause a problem.

 
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so I should not be worried about driving in rain? I would normally not drive in rain but I am bringing my car to a shop an hour away to have the front and back glass replaced and it looks like it will be raining when I do.

 
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For the rain to get in enough to cause damage someone might have to run though deep water and make a wave come over your hood. It does only take about a teaspoon of water to make enough steam to blow an engine. There were some corvettes that had issue because their inlets were so close to the front that would be splashed in and cause damage. There are drain holes in the base of the ram air cleaner. The water will be stopped by the air filter also.

The plastic inserts do seal it off really tight there is a groove in the cap that fits over the end of the cast insert in the NASA vent.

 
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You could probably go to a fabric/craft/hardware store and buy a piece of closed cell foam. Cut the foam down so it fits nicely into the openings so that if the need arises, for piece of mind, you can insert the foam to block any water.

 

Tnfastbk

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so I should not be worried about driving in rain?  I would normally not drive in rain but I am bringing my car to a shop an hour away to have the front and back glass replaced and it looks like it will be raining when I do.
The worry is totally up to you. Whatever you feel comfortable with. BUT with that being said I have driven my car somewhere around ten years now with NO blockoff plates and open ram air holes. I have been caught in heavy rains, tropical storms, and unfortunately the tail end of a hurricane with zero mechanical issues, besides the clean up (wipe down) of the engine bay. If you are caught out in the rain usually you are cleaning your car back up anyways.

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Mister 4x4

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Mine are also frozen open - which is just fine by me since it never gets cold enough to worry about needing the engine choked up too much when starting.  I also don't ever plan on driving in the rain, but if I must I'm not going to worry about it.  As Roy, Jeff, and David have mentioned, it would take a LOT of water getting sucked in to be enough of a threat for engine damage.  Aside from the drain holes doing their job, the air filter will saturate and cause performance issues long before there's any danger of the engine seizing up.

It would also probably take more than a teaspoon to really FUBAR an engine, but David's right that it doesn't take much to do so.  I watched a Chevy Beretta suck in its fill at a low water crossing after a storm one day, and we were able to get it running again a few minutes later after pulling the plugs and evacuating the water (shot it out the plug holes about 15 feet when we cranked the engine).  After drying out the air filter and replacing the plugs, the car reluctantly fired up and smoothed out after a few minutes... back to normal. 

Oddly enough, there are actually water injection systems out there that shoot a mist of cool water straight down the throat, the theory being it will cool the air and effectively condense it for more power (with more fuel, of course).

 

donkost

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Just piling on here.  Beginning in 1980 and for a few years, I drove a '68 GTO 400 4 speed daily where I had opened the hood scoops.  The inserts were metal so I carefully cut out the opening in metal shop.  Didn't even flake off any of the paint around the opening.  Drove that car in rain and snow without a problem.  I did not have a Ram Air-style air cleaner, so whatever water got in there was accessing the engine compartment.  18 year old me just thought it would be "cool" to have open hood scoops. 😉

 
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