Console Clock restoration / repair

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I just picked up a console clock that works, but about every minute, it makes a sound like it is skipping gears. I just sold a full length console that I restored, but minus the clock (and ash tray if anybody has one for sale) and I can sell the clock on to that person, but first I need to get it working properly. I don't want to rip into it without prior knowledge.  Looking on E-Pay, the dreamers want up to a 100 bucks US for non working ones claiming a quartz clock can be installed.

My question to my most knowledgeable friends is this, is there a quartz clock mechanism that will fit and work, and if so what and where can it be found.

If not, does anyone have knowledge of how to repair the original.

Thanks,

Geoff.

 

73pony

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Not sure how to repair it. but if you don't want to mess with it and are interested in just selling it as is I would be interested in buying it.

 

c9zx

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The sound may be the clock spring rewinding (normal). The quartz conversion may actually keep time correctly. I'd leave it alone if it is working. Chuck

http://www.clockwks.com/Quartzx.html

 
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Not sure how to repair it. but if you don't want to mess with it and are interested in just selling it as is I would be interested in buying it.
 Thanks, but the guy who bought the console has first dibs. I'll PM you if he decides not to buy it, but it could be awhile.

 
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The sound may be the clock spring rewinding (normal). The quartz conversion may actually keep time correctly. I'd leave it alone if it is working. Chuck

http://www.clockwks.com/Quartzx.html
A spring!! didn't know it had one, but that would account for it still running after the power is disconnected. It may just need a good cleaning then.

Thanks,

Geoff.

 
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73pony

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Not sure how to repair it. but if you don't want to mess with it and are interested in just selling it as is I would be interested in buying it.
 Thanks, but the guy who bought the console has first dibs. I'll PM you if he decides not to buy it, but it could be awhile.
Cool. Thanks. I have been looking for a clock, working or not for quite some time.

 

NG8264723

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Purchased in 1997 or so
I had mine repaired

Click to enlarge

Clock Servicing - Ford, Lincoln, Mercury OEM movement 1964-1973

Don't want to lose the classic movement of your factory clock by converting to quartz? Let me repair, clean and adjust the original movement. I can perform minor repairs to the movement for less than half of a conversion. If your original movement is not repairable I have a stock of repaired OEM units so I can replace the entire movement if necessary.

•If I can't fix your clock I only charge $10.00 for diagnosis and refund the rest of the service charge.

•Price includes a NEW set of contacts. The contacts are the most failure prone part of these clocks.

•If any other parts are needed you will be contacted before any work is done.

•Clock repair requires the core clock be complete and have a working set mechanism (used to set the time).

•Purchase a new lens from me and I will install it free of charge.

•Repaired clocks have a 2 year repair or refund warranty.

Available? I need your clock. Estimated Turn-around is 10 business days between receipt of your clock and return shipping.

Clock Service

$50.00

 

NG8264723

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Rocketman cougar was the name of the clock guy

 
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Not sure how to repair it. but if you don't want to mess with it and are interested in just selling it as is I would be interested in buying it.
 Thanks, but the guy who bought the console has first dibs. I'll PM you if he decides not to buy it, but it could be awhile.
Cool. Thanks. I have been looking for a clock, working or not for quite some time.
  There are a few on E-pay, but not cheap, but worth a look.

 
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The loud click/thunk is a good thing - it means that the clock is winding.

Your clock is electro-mechanical; It is a basic clock mechanism with springs, cogs, gears and all the cool things that make a clock work, but it had an electric 'winder' mechanism.

There is a set of points that close as the clock runs. When the points contact each other a solenoid fires and yanks a stationary arm with one of the points down toward the other side of the points on the moving (unwinding) arm. This happens so fast that the moving arm is flung away and winds the clock. As the clock runs the points slowly close until they touch and the clock gets wound again. Over and over and over - until it doesn't.

The main killer of the clocks is low voltage - the points close but there's not enough umph to fire the solenoid so the points stay closed and the solenoid windings burn up. Since they are mounted on a plastic plate the heat warps or melts the plate and the winder assembly is junk.

Another killer is that the points wear out after years of arcing. Normally this makes the clock wind more often, thus burning out the winder.

Occasionally I get a clock that the mechanical portion has worn out - normally the winder shaft has worn it's brass mounting hole into a slot.

I do see a lot of clocks with broken timer springs - always caused by someone trying to 'fix the clock.

The bad news is that these clocks were made by General Time (there's a GT stamped on the back of the case) and they are not as common as the BORG clocks used by Ford for almost 25 years. Parts are not available, you have to make them or salvage them from another movement. Many are pressed together so internal repairs are not worth the time & trouble - even if you can find the parts.

ISI (Instrument Services Inc) is the only place doing the quartz conversion. They have to rework the (overly complicated) set mechanism on the mounting plate to accept a Borg type quartz movement. Last I knew they were charging $155 for the conversion and it has a 2 year warranty.

https://www.clocksandgauges.com/contact-us.html

Personally, I prefer the original thunking, ticking movements. This is odd since all my other stuff is modern guts in OEM cases.

 
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The loud click/thunk is a good thing - it means that the clock is winding.

Your clock is electro-mechanical; It is a basic clock mechanism with springs, cogs, gears and all the cool things that make a clock work, but it had an electric 'winder' mechanism.

There is a set of points that close as the clock runs. When the points contact each other a solenoid fires and yanks a stationary arm with one of the points down toward the other side of the points on the moving (unwinding) arm. This happens so fast that the moving arm is flung away and winds the clock. As the clock runs the points slowly close until they touch and the clock gets wound again. Over and over and over - until it doesn't.

The main killer of the clocks is low voltage - the points close but there's not enough umph to fire the solenoid so the points stay closed and the solenoid windings burn up. Since they are mounted on a plastic plate the heat warps or melts the plate and the winder assembly is junk.

Another killer is that the points wear out after years of arcing. Normally this makes the clock wind more often, thus burning out the winder.

Occasionally I get a clock that the mechanical portion has worn out - normally the winder shaft has worn it's brass mounting hole into a slot.

I do see a lot of clocks with broken timer springs - always caused by someone trying to 'fix the clock.

The bad news is that these clocks were made by General Time (there's a GT stamped on the back of the case) and they are not as common as the BORG clocks used by Ford for almost 25 years. Parts are not available, you have to make them or salvage them from another movement. Many are pressed together so internal repairs are not worth the time & trouble - even if you can find the parts.

ISI (Instrument Services Inc) is the only place doing the quartz conversion. They have to rework the (overly complicated) set mechanism on the mounting plate to accept a Borg type quartz movement. Last I knew they were charging $155 for the conversion and it has a 2 year warranty.

https://www.clocksandgauges.com/contact-us.html

Personally, I prefer the original thunking, ticking movements. This is odd since all my other stuff is modern guts in OEM cases.
 Bob, thanks for the very interesting response to my question. Perhaps it is good and no need to do anything. I think many will appreciate your comments as clocks seem to be very few and far between. Most consoles I have seen are missing the clock, likely for the reasons you give.

As for mine, perhaps I should put it on test for a few days and see what happens. It will either run as it should or not.

 As for converting to quartz, to pay that much in US dollars is out of the question right now. However, being the "I can fix it" type of guy, I wouldn't be afraid to make whatever parts I need to fit a quartz movement. BUT only if all I really had was just a case and clock face. My whole working career was about building prototypes and finding ways to make stuff work.

Thanks,

 Geoff.

PS, my tach conversion that was sticking on start up seems to be better now, rarely sticks anymore. I love it too, a great conversion from idiot lights and a great conversation piece as well!

 

goodnigh

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The loud click/thunk is a good thing - it means that the clock is winding.

Your clock is electro-mechanical; It is a basic clock mechanism with springs, cogs, gears and all the cool things that make a clock work, but it had an electric 'winder' mechanism.

There is a set of points that close as the clock runs. When the points contact each other a solenoid fires and yanks a stationary arm with one of the points down toward the other side of the points on the moving (unwinding) arm. This happens so fast that the moving arm is flung away and winds the clock. As the clock runs the points slowly close until they touch and the clock gets wound again. Over and over and over - until it doesn't.

The main killer of the clocks is low voltage - the points close but there's not enough umph to fire the solenoid so the points stay closed and the solenoid windings burn up. Since they are mounted on a plastic plate the heat warps or melts the plate and the winder assembly is junk.

Another killer is that the points wear out after years of arcing. Normally this makes the clock wind more often, thus burning out the winder.

Occasionally I get a clock that the mechanical portion has worn out - normally the winder shaft has worn it's brass mounting hole into a slot.

I do see a lot of clocks with broken timer springs - always caused by someone trying to 'fix the clock.

The bad news is that these clocks were made by General Time (there's a GT stamped on the back of the case) and they are not as common as the BORG clocks used by Ford for almost 25 years. Parts are not available, you have to make them or salvage them from another movement. Many are pressed together so internal repairs are not worth the time & trouble - even if you can find the parts.

ISI (Instrument Services Inc) is the only place doing the quartz conversion. They have to rework the (overly complicated) set mechanism on the mounting plate to accept a Borg type quartz movement. Last I knew they were charging $155 for the conversion and it has a 2 year warranty.

https://www.clocksandgauges.com/contact-us.html

Personally, I prefer the original thunking, ticking movements. This is odd since all my other stuff is modern guts in OEM cases.
Somwhere on this forum there is a post about using a capacitor bank to fire the coils and rewind

the spring.  There is no direct connection to the battery so the points/coils cannot be "fried" as mentioned.

Sam Goldwasser designed and built this for my clock,  works perfect and keeps good time.  Tic,tic,tic sound

and jerky hand movement.

mike

Addendum: Found the schematic. This has been running in my car for several years.

This is in the public domain, feel free to build one.

https://www.repairfaq.org/sam/sgmccsch.pdf

mike

 
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Bob,

Since you are the clock expert here I have a question. I want to remove the clear face of the clock to polish. How do I get the setting stem out so I can remove face and clean inside and polish outside? I have 6 to do.

Thanks,

David

 

goodnigh

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Bob,

Since you are the clock expert here I have a question. I want to remove the clear face of the clock to polish. How do I get the setting stem out so I can remove face and clean inside and polish outside? I have 6 to do.

Thanks,

David
It unscrews counter clockwise, may need to apply a little heat.

Pull out stem and grab with pliers then unscrew knob.

mike

 
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Bob,

Since you are the clock expert here I have a question. I want to remove the clear face of the clock to polish. How do I get the setting stem out so I can remove face and clean inside and polish outside? I have 6 to do.

Thanks,

David
It unscrews counter clockwise, may need to apply a little heat.

Pull out stem and grab with pliers then unscrew knob.

mike
I was trying that but afraid I would break something. Did not want to move. Will heat gun it a little. Thanks

 
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