Custom 71 coupe for sale

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Mister 4x4

Too Big to Sneak
Staff member
Administrator
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Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
8,179
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Location
San Angelo, Texas
My Car
1971 Mustang Mach 1
You want a quality build, you pay... other then the rear spoiler and the honk'in exhaust hanging out the back, I like the car. Try and build one from ground up and see how much it costs. $85K? I would have been happy with this bill...
I don't disagree - having actually built one from the ground up. ;)

I know I've got more than $45K wrapped-up in mine, but that's just for parts, paint, glass installation, and a scant few media-blasting jobs that I farmed out to some local businesses (that also doesn't include shipping costs or tax for the parts, or labor of any kind since I did just about everything myself).  Some loose, fuzzy math says I have almost 2000 hours involved (most weekends-only over the span of 4+ years) - what would be a fair price to factor in for labor if I were to pay myself as a non-professional?  I actually came up with the number of $50/hr, since most professional restoration shops are charging north of $90/hr (and up).  I figured that was fair, since I do have [most of] the necessary skills... just not professionally recognized.

Add it all up, and we're talking about a price tag of $150K+, just to break even.  On paper, it makes perfect sense when you can see where all of the money went.  In reality though... not so much.  There's no way in Hell mine would be valued over 6-figures.

Reality for me has mine valued in the $22-28K range, depending on the buyer.  Why so low?  It's an H-Code "Day Two restomod," which means it's basically a restored-to-mostly-stock car with some old-school cosmetic modifications.  Slap on a different set of wheels, and I also might be able to pass it off as a Pro-Touring Restomod, since there are plenty of modern non-cosmetic performance upgrades included.

Based on that mindset, and the going market-rate for vehicles of our vintage models/years, that's why I have difficulties with the $43K price for a restomodded originally non-descript hardtop.  I don't disagree with the sentiment of 'you get what you pay for' in the least... it's just a hard pill to swallow, all things considered.

 

rolandmhall

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2011
Messages
283
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Location
St. Louis, MO
My Car
72 Mustang Coupe - Restomod
I get it. But for me it sure seems like a sign that our mustangs are finally being recognized in the classic car market and the prices are beginning to reflect the trend. I say to everyone hold on to your cars because the values are definitely rising. Everywhere I go i get compliments and people saying how much they love the big mustangs.

In a few years that 43k is going to be a steal.

 
Joined
Jul 6, 2015
Messages
4,241
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Location
Iowa
My Car
1973 Mustang Grande 351C 2v
I get it. But for me it sure seems like a sign that our mustangs are finally being recognized in the classic car market  and the prices are beginning to reflect the trend.  I say to everyone hold on to your cars because the values are definitely rising.  Everywhere I go i get compliments and people saying how much they love the big mustangs.

In a few years that 43k is going to be a steal.
I agree 100% here.

 
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