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Jayro

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Honestly feel like all I do is post dumb questions but here goes.

What is this blue can item? I could be wrong but seems to be a type of catch can but seems the fuel line to it is vaping from the fuel tank?
 

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Charcoal cannister. Very early form of emissions control. The fuel vapors from your fuel tank come into this can and are passed throough some charcoal that is inside it before they are sucked back into your engine through a hose that goes to the air cleaner.
 

Jayro

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Charcoal cannister. Very early form of emissions control. The fuel vapors from your fuel tank come into this can and are passed throough some charcoal that is inside it before they are sucked back into your engine through a hose that goes to the air cleaner.
Can I just remove it? Mine just has that “foil” hose off the top that just vaps to atmosphere
 

Fredensborg

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Can I just remove it? Mine just has that “foil” hose off the top that just vaps to atmosphere
No dumb questions on here, take a look at all the simple things I have asked about! :) I'll let others on here advise you if that is ok or not... but if you do remove it don't throw it away! Even if you don't want it, you can always sell it. I would be interested for sure, I've got a black one that looks like an old coffee can on mine, not sure why yours and Stanglover's are blue?
 

Ron Tanzi

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1972 Ford Mustang Mach 1 bright red, standard black interior,pb,ps
gauge package.rim blow steering wheel,15" magnum 500s,351 C 2bbl running a 4bbl Holley 600,MSD 6a with stock distributor and Pertronix,Comp cam mild grind, The Engine(rebuilt by me in 2002 for the second time the first rebuild I did was stock in 1995) made 305hp and 358 lb ft on the dyno. 9" 2.75 rear end,Global west sub frame connectors,620 front coils.Rear defroster. My parents bought my car brand new the year before I was born. I cherish it like my child.
I suggest that you keep it installed. The fuel vapors from your tank are stored in it. The vapor line that goes to the cannister from the tank should not be plugged either. It is important that the tank can vent fuel vapors especially in hot ambient temperatures.

Ron
 
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No dumb questions on here, take a look at all the simple things I have asked about! :) I'll let others on here advise you if that is ok or not... but if you do remove it don't throw it away! Even if you don't want it, you can always sell it. I would be interested for sure, I've got a black one that looks like an old coffee can on mine, not sure why yours and Stanglover's are blue?
Hey Jason, I think the black can is for the AC vacuum. At least that is how I hooked mine up. Good luck.

Tom
 
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Hello Jayro,
Ford called the blue canister a fuel vapor storage canister and has a charcoal-type material inside. The rubber line from it attaches to a metal line that goes to the fuel tank and a fuel vapor valve on the top of the tank. The corrugated hose connects to a stub on the side of the air cleaner. The canister stores fuel vapor from the tank, and when the engine is started, the vapor is pulled through the air cleaner into the combustion chamber, where it is burnt.
The '71-72 canister is shorter, making the '73 version a one-year-only part. Ford installed it on full-size Ford, Gran Torino, Mustang, Maverick, Thunderbird, Bronco, E, and F100-350 series trucks. The '74 emissions and vapor recovery requirements had changed, so the vapor recovery canister was changed to comply with the new regs.
I know these many years later, many of our '71-3s have non-stock intakes, carburetors, air cleaners, etc. If your '73 is still running the original production installed configuration, I would leave the vapor recovery system intact. Since that is how these tanks vent on our vehicles, there is the possibility of raw gas fumes being emitted into an enclosed area such as a garage. There are some members here who have experienced just that. But, your car, your decision, just my opinion.
The black canister is an AC vacuum reservoir. It ensures that all the blend doors and vacuum-operated valves continue to operate correctly when the engine is in a low vacuum range, such as when experiencing moderate or heavy acceleration. If there was no reservoir, the air would default to the defroster ducts every time you accelerated.
The picture below is the vapor recovery canister and the AC vacuum reservoir on a '73 Mach 1. :)
 

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Fredensborg

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Hello Jayro,
Ford called the blue canister a fuel vapor storage canister and has a charcoal-type material inside. The rubber line from it attaches to a metal line that goes to the fuel tank and a fuel vapor valve on the top of the tank. The corrugated hose connects to a stub on the side of the air cleaner. The canister stores fuel vapor from the tank, and when the engine is started, the vapor is pulled through the air cleaner into the combustion chamber, where it is burnt.
The '71-72 canister is shorter, making the '73 version a one-year-only part. Ford installed it on full-size Ford, Gran Torino, Mustang, Maverick, Thunderbird, Bronco, E, and F100-350 series trucks. The '74 emissions and vapor recovery requirements had changed, so the vapor recovery canister was changed to comply with the new regs.
I know these many years later, many of our '71-3s have non-stock intakes, carburetors, air cleaners, etc. If your '73 is still running the original production installed configuration, I would leave the vapor recovery system intact. Since that is how these tanks vent on our vehicles, there is the possibility of raw gas fumes being emitted into an enclosed area such as a garage. There are some members here who have experienced just that. But, your car, your decision, just my opinion.
The black canister is an AC vacuum reservoir. It ensures that all the blend doors and vacuum-operated valves continue to operate correctly when the engine is in a low vacuum range, such as when experiencing moderate or heavy acceleration. If there was no reservoir, the air would default to the defroster ducts every time you accelerated.
The picture below is the vapor recovery canister and the AC vacuum reservoir on a '73 Mach 1. :)
Thanks for that well written explanation. I'll have to check all my vacuum lines as my heater seems to put out heat even when its not called for.
 

Bruce H

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Regarding the vacuum canister, years ago mine rusted out around the edge of the end, sounded like an air horn at high vacuum, heckuva time figuring that out when going deaf from the noise. After I disconnected it the heater went to defrost under acceleration and braking
 
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I am out of town and do not have access to my various PDF files. The one canister is indeed to Fuel Evaporative Control, and you definitely do not want to remove it. It is one of those emission control devices that like the PCV valve, does a lot of good and does no harm. The other canister is a vacuum reserve tank, and it helps provide vacuum to the HVAC/Heater system when the engine vacuum is ow (climbing a hill, heavy acceleration, etc.). If that reserve tank leaks, or its on way check valve begins to leak, it will cause all kinds or problem with the HVAC/Heater system.

Once back home I will send you some files via attachment to this thread. I think you will find them useful. We get back home by this coming Wednesday afternoon (7/6/2022)
 
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We are finally back home. I have attached some files relating to the Fuel Evaporative Control System (PDF file pages 19-21), which includes the one blue canister behind the R/F wheel well area of the engine compartment. I will next see if I can find more into the the vacuum canister for the HVAC system as well.
 

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I did dig up some info on the HVAC system and its vacuum control system, which includes info on the vacuum reserve tank and its check valve assembly (beginning on pdf file page 10). If you have any questions or concerns just sing out and "someone" in this forum will no doubt (also) be more than happy to help.
 

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