Wilwood Dynalite Disc Brakes

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cheezsnake

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Considering upgrading my stock front disc brakes to the Wilwood Dynalite kit. I understand this requires drilling out and tapping holes in the spindle. I searched the forum, but couldn’t find examples of this being done without removing the spindles. Would like to avoid that. Has anyone successfully done this, or are there reasons you have to machine them off the car? Thanks!
 
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I have done it, but I removed the spindle. I used a drill press for the task and a good tap. I don't see a way how can you do it with the spindle in place. Coincidentally, about a month ago I replaced my spindles with new ones since the old ones allowed some bearing end play. My old spindles are about to go to the dumpster if you are interested. They have the holes taped but again, the outer bearing didn't seat well on it and allowed some end play, which is why they are eventually destined to the dumpster. I used them for a few years, but since I have been tracking the car, I feel safer with newer spindles. Removing the spindles is relatively easy but it will largely depend on how tight the ball joints are in there. In my case, one was so tight that I broke three tools. Eventually, a tool that could put a lot of pressure on the ball joint bolt in combination with a lot of heat worked. Use a separator tool such as the one you can rent from Autozone (OEMTOOLS 27308) to not damage the ball joints. You may have to combine this tool with heat applied on the spindle, not the bolt. Place the nut half way at the end of the bolt to protect it from damaging the thread.
 
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Also, depending what your final application is, if you are planning on taking the car to the track I suggest investing on the two-piece rotor kit. I also went for the Dynalite at first but ended up upgrading to the 140-12945. The two-piece rotor kits are nice because the rotor is aluminum and the disc is of an alloy optimized for the task. As a secondary benefit, the assembly is lighter, but it will also make you wallet lighter.
 

cheezsnake

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Thanks for the great info. I do have access to a drill press and tap set. Wishful thinking, I guess, that pulling the spindles could be avoided. Replaced the springs a couple years ago. Not excited about messing with them again. I do see, though, there are other manufacturers with disc brake kits that use the OE spindles.
 
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Thanks for the great info. I do have access to a drill press and tap set. Wishful thinking, I guess, that pulling the spindles could be avoided. Replaced the springs a couple years ago. Not excited about messing with them again. I do see, though, there are other manufacturers with disc brake kits that use the OE spindles.
You can take the spindle out without touching the front springs. If the ball joints are not stuck on the spindle removing it is quite easy, especially since you are going to change the brakes. now, if those ball joints are stuck in there, they can be a pain to remove. Get you BFH ready to pound on that spindle...
 
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Thanks for the great info. I do have access to a drill press and tap set. Wishful thinking, I guess, that pulling the spindles could be avoided. Replaced the springs a couple years ago. Not excited about messing with them again. I do see, though, there are other manufacturers with disc brake kits that use the OE spindles.
As said in the above post. You should be able to remove the spindle without dealing with the springs. You may want to place some wood pieces between the UCA and frame to keep the springs compressed and the suspension up. I have a different setup but keeping the UCA up was really helpful. If the ball joints are stuck try the tips I posted above with the ball joint separator and heat. At least they worked for me.
 
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