Fabrice's 429CJ 71 project

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I'm a 2-D CAD person, but I have over 40 years experience. I can give you multiple views. DXF is no issue. I'm on AutoCAD 2022, I just never learned 3-D, GM wants all facilities and equipment drawn in 2-D AutoCAD, so that's what I know. I'll measure the thickness (gauge) of the steel sheet stock for you. It's relatively light gauge.
 
Time for a little update

Unlike in most of the world where summer has arrived fr ages, even with crazy high temps, seasons are here locked to October. rain, rain and low temps.
That to say, that in a rare weekends when weather was okish(dry) I went enjoy my 73... well that too, isn't really true at least until a few weeks back..

My Holley Sniper was acting weird for a while and as said in my last post, I bought an external regulator and needed to have the time to install it.
Well, it was a good move because all my issues are gone. from the first test install, where the pressure is to be set, it looks like the pressure was way too high, 72ish vs the 59.5 psi expected by the unit. So once a few tests were done with temp lines, I needed to spend some time to install this properly... and go test drive over a few weeks to see if the problem would return. So far, not a single issue since install..


sniper_regulator.jpg

After 2 blank installs to test each lines (feed and return), As I did not wanted to make holes into the firewall and also did not wanted to replaced the breaded hose that was in place for just a few months, I did pick the location where on 73, there is this piece of plastic for vacuum connection that I no longer use for years. so removed it and made a bracket that would bridge nicely. And could cut the line I had. For my 429, I'll install one of these right away but probably else where.


cleanup_molding.jpg

In past weeks the 71 project did not stay still. I did lots of things like enjoying to the max for hours the removal of excessive ancient glue/kit stuff from my rear window moldings.
I did not even come to polishing/dents fixing for these, I was simply tired to look at them after this ungratefull task! Took ages as thinner, acetone did nothing and it had to be tediously removed bits by bits! :O

more_fun_paintremoval.jpg

the plan was to turn the car around for weeks, but as mother nature served us only rain for weeks, one thing that needed be done is to remove the rest of the paint from the roof. The rest was already done. If you wonder why I remove 4 layers of ancient paint this way: it makes no noise (something my neighbors like) and much less of a mess in my little garage. Tho fun is something else!! :)

While I did not find anything on the 1/2 roof done previously, on the right front side, I have discovered some ancient repair using bondo and even rust!! :O


roof_fix.jpg

Once the bondo was removed, the rust turned out to be almost nothing. The metal has some small creases/dents, deep enough to explain the bondo as a repair, as you need to "spoon" from behind and remove the interior/head liner. In my case ofc, no issue with that! So used my self made spoon (and ancient file bended to go places no finger/dolly can go) and after a few session of carefully hammering/spooning, brought the lows back to where they should be. There is so little diff now, that a bit charged sprayed layer of primer should suffice to cover it completely.


lip_window.jpg

Another little thing; on the rear window lip, passenger side, no matter the excess of kit being used, the water had found its way, and there were 2 places that needed attention, or better said: a small chirurgical intervention. So cut these sick places, made templates with excess (to trim later), sprayed some zinc and zapped in some strong zincor metal. Poof: like new! :D


opportunity.jpg

Eventually a day with no rain and my "help people" available came so I finally could push the car on street, turn it and push it back in to start the next chapter of the body restoration: fixing the rusty rear! Much better light and of course my tools/bench near! :)


mans_work.jpg

Time to get to work: the most rear part of the trunk floor is crispy and so is the taillight panel...
Plan from 3 weeks ago was to remove the tail panel... but turns out no less than 79 spot welds needed be drilled among other things... The poor thing might be in a bad shape, it was amazing how hard it fought me to finally let go! My back demanded me to do this in 2 steps!


tailpanel_out.jpg

The last 10 cm / 3'' were the toughest. Somehow that poor thing, still healthy there, didn't want to let go and I had to be a real man to persuade it! :D


fold_down.jpg

Because last weekend the weather decided to be seasonal unlike past weeks. I did what I wanted do for a while: clean up the fold down. The idea, obviously, was to remove the dirt, but mainly to see if I will need to change the carpet or not. Few hours later with loads of soap/washing machine stuff and elbow oil, got it so far that no coloured water came out. And put the 3 part of the fold down dry in the sun. Once dry, it was clear that 2 are ok, one is discoloured by the sun. So chances are I will replace them unless I find some kind of pigment/ink for this as the carpet on itself is in good shape. The metal needs plating, so will do this during the winter. I needed have it appart and clean first anyway...


next_patient_trunk_floor.jpg

This weekend I've returned to the 71, next patient: The trunk floor. My back didn't really enjoy the idea at first, but eventually after seeing the percentage of rust on my car diminishing every bits I was removing, I found the motivation and in few hours the rusted to death metal was out. Well most of it... I first drilled from behind to make sure I wouldn't cut anything structural and cut in between dots. The real fun was yet to come, as it was so rusty, there was no way to locate the spot welds! ::O


floor_out.jpg

Expecting more corrosion horrors I was actually surprised by 2 things: first the frame is in excellent shape. As if it was zinc coated. In many places it's as new, there is only light rust that will be gone in no time as soon as it meets my acid... :D
The second good news is that the metal of the floor is healthy at the second V transversal frame piece. Still have the original paint underneath too. So this means less work! As I was planning to remove the fold down structure, which won't be necessary. I should be able to weld the new part on 1/2 that frame lip and obtain very strong bind.
But before I even start do this. I have have plenty more to do in the drop-offs regions...

All with all I've been busy here and there and the project enters a new chapter!

To be continued...
 
Your sheet metal work looks incredible, as has been the case in all you previous posts! I really enjoy your updates. I'm looking forward to each of your progress reports.

By the way, I'm working on the drawing for the grille center support bracket we discussed. I'm going to do two versions. A concourse correct version, and a slight variation that would be relatively simple to fabricate. I'll send you the DXF, PDF, and the AutoCAD file.
 
Time for a little update

Unlike in most of the world where summer has arrived fr ages, even with crazy high temps, seasons are here locked to October. rain, rain and low temps.
That to say, that in a rare weekends when weather was okish(dry) I went enjoy my 73... well that too, isn't really true at least until a few weeks back..

My Holley Sniper was acting weird for a while and as said in my last post, I bought an external regulator and needed to have the time to install it.
Well, it was a good move because all my issues are gone. from the first test install, where the pressure is to be set, it looks like the pressure was way too high, 72ish vs the 59.5 psi expected by the unit. So once a few tests were done with temp lines, I needed to spend some time to install this properly... and go test drive over a few weeks to see if the problem would return. So far, not a single issue since install..


View attachment 90728

After 2 blank installs to test each lines (feed and return), As I did not wanted to make holes into the firewall and also did not wanted to replaced the breaded hose that was in place for just a few months, I did pick the location where on 73, there is this piece of plastic for vacuum connection that I no longer use for years. so removed it and made a bracket that would bridge nicely. And could cut the line I had. For my 429, I'll install one of these right away but probably else where.


View attachment 90727

In past weeks the 71 project did not stay still. I did lots of things like enjoying to the max for hours the removal of excessive ancient glue/kit stuff from my rear window moldings.
I did not even come to polishing/dents fixing for these, I was simply tired to look at them after this ungratefull task! Took ages as thinner, acetone did nothing and it had to be tediously removed bits by bits! :O

View attachment 90726

the plan was to turn the car around for weeks, but as mother nature served us only rain for weeks, one thing that needed be done is to remove the rest of the paint from the roof. The rest was already done. If you wonder why I remove 4 layers of ancient paint this way: it makes no noise (something my neighbors like) and much less of a mess in my little garage. Tho fun is something else!! :)

While I did not find anything on the 1/2 roof done previously, on the right front side, I have discovered some ancient repair using bondo and even rust!! :O


View attachment 90725

Once the bondo was removed, the rust turned out to be almost nothing. The metal has some small creases/dents, deep enough to explain the bondo as a repair, as you need to "spoon" from behind and remove the interior/head liner. In my case ofc, no issue with that! So used my self made spoon (and ancient file bended to go places no finger/dolly can go) and after a few session of carefully hammering/spooning, brought the lows back to where they should be. There is so little diff now, that a bit charged sprayed layer of primer should suffice to cover it completely.


View attachment 90724

Another little thing; on the rear window lip, passenger side, no matter the excess of kit being used, the water had found its way, and there were 2 places that needed attention, or better said: a small chirurgical intervention. So cut these sick places, made templates with excess (to trim later), sprayed some zinc and zapped in some strong zincor metal. Poof: like new! :D


View attachment 90723

Eventually a day with no rain and my "help people" available came so I finally could push the car on street, turn it and push it back in to start the next chapter of the body restoration: fixing the rusty rear! Much better light and of course my tools/bench near! :)


View attachment 90722

Time to get to work: the most rear part of the trunk floor is crispy and so is the taillight panel...
Plan from 3 weeks ago was to remove the tail panel... but turns out no less than 79 spot welds needed be drilled among other things... The poor thing might be in a bad shape, it was amazing how hard it fought me to finally let go! My back demanded me to do this in 2 steps!


View attachment 90721

The last 10 cm / 3'' were the toughest. Somehow that poor thing, still healthy there, didn't want to let go and I had to be a real man to persuade it! :D


View attachment 90720

Because last weekend the weather decided to be seasonal unlike past weeks. I did what I wanted do for a while: clean up the fold down. The idea, obviously, was to remove the dirt, but mainly to see if I will need to change the carpet or not. Few hours later with loads of soap/washing machine stuff and elbow oil, got it so far that no coloured water came out. And put the 3 part of the fold down dry in the sun. Once dry, it was clear that 2 are ok, one is discoloured by the sun. So chances are I will replace them unless I find some kind of pigment/ink for this as the carpet on itself is in good shape. The metal needs plating, so will do this during the winter. I needed have it appart and clean first anyway...


View attachment 90719

This weekend I've returned to the 71, next patient: The trunk floor. My back didn't really enjoy the idea at first, but eventually after seeing the percentage of rust on my car diminishing every bits I was removing, I found the motivation and in few hours the rusted to death metal was out. Well most of it... I first drilled from behind to make sure I wouldn't cut anything structural and cut in between dots. The real fun was yet to come, as it was so rusty, there was no way to locate the spot welds! ::O


View attachment 90718

Expecting more corrosion horrors I was actually surprised by 2 things: first the frame is in excellent shape. As if it was zinc coated. In many places it's as new, there is only light rust that will be gone in no time as soon as it meets my acid... :D
The second good news is that the metal of the floor is healthy at the second V transversal frame piece. Still have the original paint underneath too. So this means less work! As I was planning to remove the fold down structure, which won't be necessary. I should be able to weld the new part on 1/2 that frame lip and obtain very strong bind.
But before I even start do this. I have have plenty more to do in the drop-offs regions...

All with all I've been busy here and there and the project enters a new chapter!

To be continued...
Wow Fabrice, you are making a lot of progress! Everything you have done has turned out very well. I wish I could fabricate and weld as well as you can. I have been at the stage you are right now with the rear sheet metal. I remember there sure were a heck of a lot of spot welds to drill out, I don't miss doing that stage at all, haha.

Mach 1 194.jpg

Coincidentally I was just working on my fold down seat panels this last Sunday. My car was originally green with a green interior and I painted it white and am changing the interior to black. The carpet was rough and had been spray dyed from green to black by a previous owner. This is why I did not even attempt to clean it, but just ordered new carpet panels. The back of the seat panel and the hinges were originally painted green, so I just painted them black to match the interior. I also spray dyed the silver metallic vinyl the previous owner installed on the seats to black as a temporary "band-aid" so I can drive it this summer. I intend to reupholster all of the seats over the winter. I am hoping to get some time this week to finish work on the folding seat parts, so I can take them to the car this weekend and get them out of the garage and in to the car.🤞

Mach 1 985.jpg

Keep up the great work, all the expert workmanship you have done so far has been really impressive!
 
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@t.kohlmeyer thx. Well, take your time. I'll see once I got the files what I could do.

@Sheriff41 thx, tho I'm being more destructive than anything else atm! :)

@tpj71mach I can return you the same compliments: WOW! :D Yeah drilling out these spot welds wasn't really much fun. My back did not like the tail light panel lowest ones!!! You have removed the door/structure I see. On my side I'm lucky as the metal is in really good shape right after the last beads of the floor and won't need to remove that. I wasn't looking forward for it and my back even less! :)
For the fold down, I only wanted to clean it and have it in 3 pieces as it weight a ton. I'm not sure yet what I'll do with it. The carpet is not really a problem, I mean the metal around each piece. It's in good condition but rust is present just enough to annoy me. Not sure if I will re-plate, polish and coat or as you did, silver paint them or buy some stainless or aluminium square tubbing... I won't get to this thing for a while, so plenty time to decide what to do.
Good luck with the welding back!
 
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