As the wire wheel turns...and disintegrates

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Joined
Aug 27, 2021
Messages
173
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Location
Williamsburg Virginia area
My Car
1972 H code convert., 351C 2V, FMX, 9in., Ram air, Pwr Steering, Pwr Disc brakes, air-conditioning, 15" sport wheels, Ivy Glo w/white deluxe interior.
I'm not going to attempt saying that these were any better 40-50 years ago than they are now however, I used many of the angle grinder wheels on my '66 notch-back and for the life of me, I don't remember them making me feel like a pin cushion or look like I'm kin to Hellraiser.

I gave up on the cheap ones from Harbor Freight and decided to drop the 20 bucks on the better name brand version. I chose Dewalt so, for a grinding wheel to remove rut and paint, The two I'm having the most trouble with are the cup and the wheel wire not twisted wire.

At this rate, and if I chose to keep going, I'll have the price of that nice 30/60 from Eastwood covered including a sand blaster. In a different course with the weather improving, I did purchase a P.W. sandblaster attachment and it should be here tomorrow. I can use that on the removable body panels and parts but can't for the chassis or engine compartment given where I'm working now., in the garage. Without the front suspension or rear axels installed, the car is not rolling anywhere until it's painted and reassembled, at least the suspension.

I have started to prepare for using the dry sandblaster in the garage with 12 mil plastic sheeting and construction grade paper but wet is a whole different story.

Any insights or thoughts on what wheels and cups ya'll found work best and hold together?
 
The paint strip discs that look like hard sponges work well. As do the 3M wheels with a bunch of fingers. The harbor freight versions cost 1/10 the price, and hold up 1/10 as long.

And no matter what you do, a round spinning tool cant reach in the hard to reach spots like a sand blaster.

If you have a way to lift the car up out in the yard, the pressure washer sandblaster attachments work, as long as you use decent sand. They make a big mess, so I wouldnt want to try to use one inside my shop where its easier to lift the car up. You could possibly put the car on roller carts or dolleys to push it around outside.
 
When I was selling welding supplies, we sold a brand called Weiler. https://www.weilerabrasives.com/
Actually had some training from one of their factory guys at our store. This was waaaay before the internet came to town. I learned I was NOT using the correct brush for the job as well as how to use it correctly. Their website is pretty informative. Pferd is another manufacturer that makes awesome stuff.
 
The paint strip discs that look like hard sponges work well. As do the 3M wheels with a bunch of fingers. The harbor freight versions cost 1/10 the price, and hold up 1/10 as long.

And no matter what you do, a round spinning tool cant reach in the hard to reach spots like a sand blaster.

If you have a way to lift the car up out in the yard, the pressure washer sandblaster attachments work, as long as you use decent sand. They make a big mess, so I wouldnt want to try to use one inside my shop where its easier to lift the car up. You could possibly put the car on roller carts or dolleys to push it around outside.
I did pick up a couple more cup wheels, it's more out of necessity than anything. The grinder I bought was the corded Dewalt 9a, not 11a. The smaller one had a smaller price but lacks variability. It's on, 11,000 rpms or off. Recognizing that's a big portion of the failure, have toyed with the thought of building a rheostat controlled extension cord. The realization that just buying the better, variable speed Flex-Volt to match my other tools was now the less expensive route. Hindsight is 20/20.

The dolly? I've actually given that some thought but when I started pricing the required materials, I'm almost better off buying the new compressor and make a tent in the garage for sandblasting (regular, not water).

The craft type gravity sandblasters could come in handy for a more directed approach but regardless, now that I've sold my inadequate 3.4cfm C.H., I'll still be required to have a unit with a minimum of 8cfm.

The compressor is planned, just ill-timed and I believe it's possible to shift focus or delay a couple things. It's not like there aren't other things that need work, like my oil pan replacement. Who knows, maybe that lottery ticket I'm buying this weekend will provide some relief with the current issues of house and car.
Thanks for the info.
 
When I was selling welding supplies, we sold a brand called Weiler. https://www.weilerabrasives.com/
Actually had some training from one of their factory guys at our store. This was waaaay before the internet came to town. I learned I was NOT using the correct brush for the job as well as how to use it correctly. Their website is pretty informative. Pferd is another manufacturer that makes awesome stuff.
Thanks for the info. Part of my problem was answered in the previous reply and realize that the tool choice is a big contributor. I've a ton of extra electrical supplies from a demo so, the budget build of a rheostat extension cord is in the works. Just wish I wouldn't have broken down all the BX I had from the work. It's for private use so Romex will suffice.
I'll have to check out the link. Thanks again!
 
The realization that just buying the better, variable speed Flex-Volt to match my other tools was now the less expensive route.
Is that a battery powered one? IMO, you dont want to try and use that for any sort of a large job. Battery powered angle grinders have very short runtime. You would need a lot of batteries constantly rotating through a lot of chargers to be able to keep working.

I have the battery powered milwaukee one. If I was gonna try to use a grinder to strip any large amount of automobile, the grinder would stay in the drawer and I'd dig out my corded one. If I didn't have a corded one, I would go out and buy one. Even the cheap hardbor freight one with a cord would be a better tool for the job than a name brand battery powered one.
 
Is that a battery powered one? IMO, you dont want to try and use that for any sort of a large job. Battery powered angle grinders have very short runtime. You would need a lot of batteries constantly rotating through a lot of chargers to be able to keep working.

I have the battery powered milwaukee one. If I was gonna try to use a grinder to strip any large amount of automobile, the grinder would stay in the drawer and I'd dig out my corded one. If I didn't have a corded one, I would go out and buy one. Even the cheap hardbor freight one with a cord would be a better tool for the job than a name brand battery powered one.
I recently had the engine bay of my 1971 fastback media blasted with garnet media and it does a tremendous job. I have now decided to have the rest of the bottom of the car blasted as it makes the vehicle ready for paint after blowing off the excess dust. It is not cheap but what is cheap these days. I bought a large soda blaster and it uses a 175 CFM compressor but the surface still needs neutralized.
 

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From experience, I would suggest you do what it takes to roll the car outside and use a pressure washer with a cheap sand blasting attachment. It will turn 2 weeks of wire wheel work into a one day project.
I had a bunch of shipping pallets in my back yard so I rolled the car into the front driveway and jacked up the front and stuck 6 pallets under each wheel then did the same to the same to the back of the car. Mind you, I had the engine out and the interior stripped but in two days I had the car back in the garage and dried off. Water blasting is the way to go. It took a couple of hours to clean up but I saved a ton of time and money by not having to buy 20 wire wheels.
 
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Is that a battery powered one? IMO, you dont want to try and use that for any sort of a large job. Battery powered angle grinders have very short runtime. You would need a lot of batteries constantly rotating through a lot of chargers to be able to keep working.

I have the battery powered milwaukee one. If I was gonna try to use a grinder to strip any large amount of automobile, the grinder would stay in the drawer and I'd dig out my corded one. If I didn't have a corded one, I would go out and buy one. Even the cheap hardbor freight one with a cord would be a better tool for the job than a name brand battery powered one.
Corded.

As far as batteries are concerned, I invested in a Dewalt FlexVolt 20/60v Sawzall and have a couple 9-ah batteries plus the fast charger. Granted, it's not the speed of the old 20a, 18v XRP 15-minute charger but it does well enough and will fully re-charge the 9-ah battery well before the one in use expires.

Anyhow, I have the Dewalt 20a XR hammer-drill the 9a-h batteries swap into. It came with a 6-ah and that's used as a tertiary back up. Also have a couple 2-ah for a drill-driver but those won't last more than 15 minutes.

The Hammer-drill is used with the drill-end brushes for lighter cleaning and when my hands, arms and neck have been subjected to sensory over-loaded by the angle grinder. Man, the reverb on that is something else entirely not to forget mentioning when it grabs an edge the wrong way. Some days, I'm good for only a few minutes before I switch. The only thing to add there is, getting old definitely ain't for the young. Ha-ha
 
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I'm not going to attempt saying that these were any better 40-50 years ago than they are now however, I used many of the angle grinder wheels on my '66 notch-back and for the life of me, I don't remember them making me feel like a pin cushion or look like I'm kin to Hellraiser.

I gave up on the cheap ones from Harbor Freight and decided to drop the 20 bucks on the better name brand version. I chose Dewalt so, for a grinding wheel to remove rut and paint, The two I'm having the most trouble with are the cup and the wheel wire not twisted wire.

At this rate, and if I chose to keep going, I'll have the price of that nice 30/60 from Eastwood covered including a sand blaster. In a different course with the weather improving, I did purchase a P.W. sandblaster attachment and it should be here tomorrow. I can use that on the removable body panels and parts but can't for the chassis or engine compartment given where I'm working now., in the garage. Without the front suspension or rear axels installed, the car is not rolling anywhere until it's painted and reassembled, at least the suspension.

I have started to prepare for using the dry sandblaster in the garage with 12 mil plastic sheeting and construction grade paper but wet is a whole different story.

Any insights or thoughts on what wheels and cups ya'll found work best and hold together?
I've had good luck with Norton Abrasives brushes.
 
Before stoopid brexit, I could buy paint stripper and I did my entire engine bay in no time.
I recall go from a 3 layers of paint firewall to a blank metal in less than 20 minutes. places you cannot go without doing serious gym were pristine in no time.
In the states you still can buy what is now forbidden in Europe. Aircraft like products. I'm now back to mechanical things as some alternatives have popped up, but at 350-500 euros for 5 quarts!!!! vs the 40 that I used to pay when I was using an English brand.
 
From experience, I would suggest you do what it takes to roll the car outside and use a pressure washer with a cheap sand blasting attachment. It will turn 2 weeks of wire wheel work into a one day project.
I had a bunch of shipping pallets in my back yard so I rolled the car into the front driveway and jacked up the front and stuck 6 pallets under each wheel then did the same to the same to the back of the car. Mind you, I had the engine out and the interior stripped but in two days I had the car back in the garage and dried off. Water blasting is the way to go. It took a couple of hours to clean up but I saved a ton of time and money by not having to buy 20 wire wheels.
Well?
Other than a deep subject, one could make the argument that this stage is weeks from rolling. See pic below.IMG_2451.jpg

Part of the issue is I'm still collecting parts so it can roll. There's brake/diff work happening in the rear as well, but I could easily reinstall the wheels without it needing brakes to roll outside. I'll need to cross that proverbial bridge when I get there but also need to decide if the rear bearings and seals are before, during or after the frontend.

Basically, the chassis, suspension and steering are only being reinstalled in a completed state. Once that takes place, I can mask off that area and attack the others, preferably with the aid of the wet and hopefully soon to buy, dry sandblasting. If the rear work is continued, we'll probably end up getting it off the ground outside for the underside too. Trouble is, it needs to be completed daily given our community rules. Unfortunately, there are no exceptions for vehicles that can't be driven, and they must be garaged on a nightly basis.
 

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