Bump steer

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1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/408C stroker
Is bump steer a problem with the 71-73s? I have never felt it, but I assume it is probably there at very high speeds.

The reason I ask is because several companies sell tie rod relocation kits to improve bump steer. Are they worth it? 

 

Don C

Fords Forever
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Yes, you have bump steer, the question is, how much? Because of the dynamics involved in front end geometries, pivot points of upper and lower control arms and tie rods, and the amount of camber and caster, the tie rods do not swing in the same arc as the control arms. I don't believe ours have as much as the earlier Mustangs, just like we don't need the "Shelby drop", Ford did a better job on the front end geometry.

Whether or not you will benefit from the aftermarket "solution" will depend on how well they did their analysis of the geometries involved, whether or not they actually tested the results, and whether or not it's a one size fits all years solution.

Here's a decent article that explains it well and shows how to actually test the amount of bump steer

http://www.mustangandfords.com/how-to/chassis-suspension/mufp-0611-bumpsteer-explained

If you decide to follow through with checking yours, it will make a great tutorial/article for the forum.

Edit: A front suspension that is in good condition, good springs, sway bars, bushings and ball joints, will reduce bump steer and help mitigate it when it does occur during hard turns and going over humps and dips.

 
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Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Messages
3,376
Reaction score
377
Location
Madison, WI
My Car
1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/408C stroker
Yes, you have bump steer, the question is, how much? Because of the dynamics involved in front end geometries, pivot points of upper and lower control arms and tie rods, and the amount of camber and caster, the tie rods do not swing in the same arc as the control arms. I don't believe ours have as much as the earlier Mustangs, just like we don't need the "Shelby drop", Ford did a better job on the front end geometry.

Whether or not you will benefit from the aftermarket "solution" will depend on how well they did their analysis of the geometries involved, whether or not they actually tested the results, and whether or not it's a one size fits all years solution.

Here's a decent article that explains it well and shows how to actually test the amount of bump steer

http://www.mustangandfords.com/how-to/chassis-suspension/mufp-0611-bumpsteer-explained

If you decide to follow through with checking yours, it will make a great tutorial/article for the forum.

Edit: A front suspension that is in good condition, good springs, sway bars, bushings and ball joints, will reduce bump steer and help mitigate it when it does occur during hard turns and going over humps and dips.
Thanks Don. You are confirming my thoughts. Bump steer will definitely be more noticeable the faster you drive. It may be one of those things that you won't notice until open racing. I have not noticed it during AutoX or driving around.

 
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