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Carpet replacement


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Replacing my carpet today. Did not find any rust to speak of (one very small spot). Am wondering is there any other work I should do while I have the carpet removed? Any insight would be appreciated! See attached photos.

 

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NO RUST! Lucky dog.

 

Time for Dynamat sound deaden-er IMO.

 

Paul

73 Grande

351C 2v

Now 4v Carb/Cam/headers/T5

 

Gasoline is for washing parts.

Alcohol is for drinking.

Nitomethane is for racing!

 

 

Work in Progress photos here:

Last Update: 4/23/16

 

http://s1270.photobucket.com/user/therocket366/library/?sort=3&page=1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi John,

 

Yeah , i would agree with what Paul just said. You are fortunate with little to mainly no rust issues.A nice original floor pan!::thumb::

 

My take on it, or my basic advice would be this. Would you believe my '73 Vert floor was the same as yours - very original with a very small area of surface rust. I recarpeted, and took these steps. So, the first thing to take care of is any rust spots. This can be a DIY job. If you wanted to use a home sand blaster, you could, but that's going to be messy. On that basis you would need to well isolate the rest of the car from any sand migration. But my approach would be to grind or sand the rust down to remove as much as you can, then follow through with a quality rust convertor, leave to dry out then spray a quality primer of your choice to seal off that treated area. Spray a little color over that as well if you want to make the repaired areas look like the original floor pan finish - that's optional.

 

From there you have two choices. I used the sound deadener matting Dynamat. But i know there are a lot of Forum guys who have used other products and brands and love them also. I would highly recommend you use a matting. It really does make a big difference in all ways, and is well worth the time and money spent. That can be DIY job as well if you want.

 

If you don't put any matting down, then i would go with plan B, and proceed to apply a quality rust preventive coating over the entire floor pan area.This can be brushed or sprayed on. I like Valvoline Tectyl coating for inner cavity areas, but have a look around, there might be better suited products for a floor pan application. Brands and products like Por 15 might have what you're chasing there. On the other hand, once you've taken care of those rust areas, you could choose to leave the floor pan original as it is and do nothing but put new carpet down again.

 

But again, i would recommend treating the rust, then use a product like Dynamat, and then follow through with your new carpet. That's what i did, and i'm very happy with the end result.

 

Cheers,

 

Greg.:)

:whistling: LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED

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Hi John,

 

Yeah , i would agree with what Paul just said. You are fortunate with little to mainly no rust issues.A nice original floor pan!::thumb::

 

My take on it, or my basic advice would be this. Would you believe my '73 Vert floor was the same as yours - very original with a very small area of surface rust. I recarpeted, and took these steps. So, the first thing to take care of is any rust spots. This can be a DIY job. If you wanted to use a home sand blaster, you could, but that's going to be messy. On that basis you would need to well isolate the rest of the car from any sand migration. But my approach would be to grind or sand the rust down to remove as much as you can, then follow through with a quality rust convertor, leave to dry out then spray a quality primer of your choice to seal off that treated area. Spray a little color over that as well if you want to make the repaired areas look like the original floor pan finish - that's optional.

 

From there you have two choices. I used the sound deadener matting Dynamat. But i know there are a lot of Forum guys who have used other products and brands and love them also. I would highly recommend you use a matting. It really does make a big difference in all ways, and is well worth the time and money spent. That can be DIY job as well if you want.

 

If you don't put any matting down, then i would go with plan B, and proceed to apply a quality rust preventive coating over the entire floor pan area.This can be brushed or sprayed on. I like Valvoline Tectyl coating for inner cavity areas, but have a look around, there might be better suited products for a floor pan application. Brands and products like Por 15 might have what you're chasing there. On the other hand, once you've taken care of those rust areas, you could choose to leave the floor pan original as it is and do nothing but put new carpet down again.

 

But again, i would recommend treating the rust, then use a product like Dynamat, and then follow through with your new carpet. That's what i did, and i'm very happy with the end result.

 

Cheers,

 

Greg.:)

 

+1 what Greg say's :goodpost:

 

-use wax or rust prevent for hollow spaces (white/yellow sticky stuff on picture)

http://www.sierramadrecollection.com/Cavity-Protection-Wax-Wurth-p26504.html

-use floorboard sound insulation (like all car makers/brands do)

-i used a first underlay carpet(rotting free)under the nice last carpet

-don't forget the trunk floor or the inside roofskin

here some pictures:

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That's Great that you had no rust!!!

 

as others have said, clean the floor really good, and rust proof it, and now it the time to put in some Dyno-mat or equivalent.

Iyman

1972 Mustang Convertable :run_horse:  [button=http://www.7173mustangs.com/forum-garage?filterxt_uid=1507]Visit My Garage[/button]

Visit the Mustang Car Club of New England Facebook Page [button=https://www.facebook.com/MUSTANGCCNE]MCCNE FB Page[/button]

 

Visit the Mustang Car Club of New England Web Page [button=http://www.mccne.com/]MCCNE Web Page[/button]

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I have been doing a deep detail on my 73 vert and would make the following suggestion.

I would ask how well your windows roll up and down? I would pull the rear seat and take the side panels off and address the old grease. It is very simple and no special tools. I just took mine out and cleaned all the ancient grease off everything and put back in. I used Lucas Oil Red & Tacky grease much better than the old white lithium grease.

I did come up with my own process of removing everything that seemed to work easily. I was going to do a thread later with the pictures I took. Here are the basics.

After removing the inner panel I took the two Philips screws out of the trim attach tab at the very top and removed it.

I then marked the position of the window up stop and down stop and removed them.

What I am calling the guide plate is the panel that has the slots that the rollers run in. Mark around the bolts and nut to give you reinstall position. Loosen the bottom bolt until nearly out, remove the top nut and loosen the bolt until nearly out.

Now roll the window down take the hair pin clip off the pin that holds the window regulator on, careful so it doesn’t go hide somewhere. There should be a washer on the outside of the regulator arm and one on the inside take those off.

Remove the rubber seal on the front edge of the door post Philips screws. Good time to change them if needed.

Now wind the window regulator up until it is all parallel front to back to make it as skinny as possible.

Reach in the opening and lift the window up and tilt the guide plate and window inboard and slide the window out the top with rollers attached.

Now you can take the 4 bolts out of the regulator two near the crank handle and two in the rear you get to by going through the top mechanism. One of the rear bolts is a little difficult to get to but I did get it out and back in. Now with the bolts out of the regulator you can take it out the hole in the bottom of the inner reinforcement.

Now all that is left is to take the guide plate bolts out and lift it up and out the top of the quarter panel. I cleaned all the pieces with kerosene, brush then brake parts cleaner. If you have rust you might want to do some clean up there. Good time to clean the glass good also.

I lubed everything guide tracks, rollers, gear and pivots on the regulator and connection point to the window with the Lucas Oil Red & Tacky.

If you want to change the felts on the outside quarter panel to help prevent water getting in it is a good time to do that also.

There are usually leaves, nuts and all sorts of stuff collected in the quarter good time to vacuum this all out. Look at the sealer in there and if cracked maybe freshen it up some. I found a factory swivel socket in mine.

Going back reverse the steps.

Put the guide plate in and install the bottom bolt loosely, install the top bolt loosely. Slide the window into the guide plate making sure all three rollers hit the tracks. Put the top nut on and align with your marks to set in correct position and tighten them all down.

Insert the window regulator with it set in the position to make it as narrow as possible. Get all four of the bolts started then tighten them up securely. I had to use a long boxed in wrench for the one in the rear that is blocked by part of the top mechanism.

Roll the regulator down and put one washer with some grease on the post on the window put the regulator arm on then the other washer with some grease and install the hair pin.

Put the up stop and down stop back in and position them in their original positions and tighten down.

Put the trim clip on the top again and install the rubber molding on the door post.

You should be able to roll the window up and down with one finger and soooo smooth and quiet.

If the window is not aligned or goes up to high to too low simply adjust the stops and guide plate to correct. The tilt of the guide plate is done by the adjustable tab in the very bottom that you did not take loose.

You can do some cleaning on the front windows without removing and lube them with the same super smooth quiet operation. You can also pull it all apart if you desire but more work.

I have read where some have issues getting the windows out. I bet I can pull a rear side window in 5 minutes if the interior is out. Total time to remove clean and reinstall was about 3 hours with me stopping to get new music going and play with the pup. Do one at a time so you have your reference assembly.

I would also look at your hoses on the top cylinders and the seal on the cylinder shaft and look for leaks. Makes a mess of new carpets if cylinders leak.

I also found that the PO had pulled the rubber plugs out to put shocks on and did not put them back so dust had poured in so I cleaned all that up and put new plugs in.

Going to cut some new vapor barriers for each side and add some more sound deadening under the seat.

Just some suggestions while you have the seats out of the way and it makes the windows work so much better. Camera at the shop so no pictures now but could add maybe tonight.

David

When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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