Fabrice's 429CJ 71 project

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I am Currently restomoding a 71 Fastback. I designed a wide-body kit for the rear of the car and a more aggressive front nose. The back of the car is 6 inches wider than stock to accommodate the 315 on 12 inch rims.
My friend this car is becoming something so special. The fact that it was rescued from the crusher is a story to be told at all the events you go to when it’s done. With the tedious work and care and attention to detail this car and it’s resurrection will be famous. I’m in Toronto Canada, you’d expect to see plenty of 71-3 mustangs around but you really don’t. It’s like seeing a ghost! In the last 20 years I’ve seen maybe 3 drive past me on the road and I quickly point my truck in that direction and follow it for kilometres. So sexy in motion. To have one in Europe and it being a 429. Wow. I’m excited for you. Looking forward to seeing more.

 

JD79

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Nice and rare car ! Looking forward to your updates !

 

Fabrice

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thx guys :)

k, so weekend was mostly focusing on the 73, but in between electrics/welding/sanding for it, I've continued on the 429.

This time, another set of rusty things: the pulleys and the damper.

Both pulleys were chromed at some point, poorly done. As usual chrome doesn't work very well on concave shapes and of course Mrs Rust saw her chance once more.

The pulleys and the damper were very dirty. The damper had some thick greasy/dirt of 40 years on it, and lots of rust...



After detergent bath, brushing, sanding, small acid treatment and a touch of paint for the inner details, the damper is now as new.

Some cracks in the rubber on one side, slightly off metal level (where not in sandwich) and not deep.

So will kit these just for the sake of saying its closed and will also paint timing marks, as they are not really easy to be seen in real (somehow on pict they are)



(if you guys have some idea on how to make a nice readable and thin mark, please shoot! For now thinking, i'm prolly going mask/airbrush some bright color)



After a degreasing session the ladies pulleys went into a rust dissolver bath.



Not happy about the results yet, tho, much better than they were, I decided let them a day or two in there.

With bits of luck, the idea is to paint them all, but keep bits of the chrome in front, where its in good state...

More rusty things coming back to life next time :)

 

Fabrice

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thx Kevin!

It was a long weekend and weather was wonderful, so been busy...

Unlike the awesome Tony-muscle's project, i'm not yet so far that I can show some bling bling,

instead more, rust and dirt in this post!



After i've let the pulleys in the rust dissolver for a few days, I got them much better, but not really usable as chromed items.

If you compare with the previous post, its clear, this rust thingy will now be part of most old parts restorations.

Especially because once its dry, it leave a layer that closes all pores of the metal and is also an ideal surface for a primer.



so started prime them with a rich in zinc primer coating that I was also using for the 73.

For the fun of it, I've left some of the chrome where it was perfect, only a bit in front. will see if the time spend on masking was worth it...



I came back on the markings of the damper too. As I want something permanent, I sprayed rough lines going -10 to 30 btdc

I need reduce them on their width and find some small letters stickers, so I can at least add at least a zero. to be continued.



Weather was really great, water sanding, priming, water sanding and water sanding and priming.... awesome. more sanding

needed do/fix that fender for ages and either weather was never good or never had the energy to start with it. Now its almost done.

just need paint the inside, and prime one last thin primer layer and re-water sand ultra fine.

On monday, my wife decided to hang the wash in garden... so long for spraying. No prob, I was out of paint anyway.

So far never had the time to look really in details under the hood, as I was mostly busy on the 73 and handling the parts that were stored outside the car..



Before opening it, as I've mentioned before but never showed, here's the "tres 1980" perso on the hood, a remake of one of Boris Vallejo famous paintings.

Some art critics may hate me later, but sorry, it will have to go!

So next is start clean up / sort the engine bay and its remaining parts...

in short really inspect the damage and repeat WTF a thousand times :)



Forgot to take a pict once done, but basically the crap dustbin was full end of the day, with the most crappy electrics ever!

@randy, beware! some picts might be disturbing to you!



The pump and alternator, both will be restored and I'll post on these when i'll handle them.



wtf! wtf! what this???



like a "de la Tourette" patient. :) wtf wtf wtf whole day. I have made many more picts I save for ref later on, I'll spare you the sadness.

but these are self explanatory.

At some point the engine bay started look better, and while I had to find out I miss a few more parts :(

There were also good news, very good ones.



Like the engine bay in general, very little damage or corrosion. In frame cavities, its dirty but not corroded.



and even the very dirty cowl vent has almost no rust.

I was expecting lots of welding in engine bay, aside a bit of rust on driver apron at the top, and a few holes made for the creative electrics. no welding.

wheel sides, same, its all well preserved.

The fenders, both sides however, will need serious massages... rust and quite a few dents.

Ah well, just did the 73, so not scared to do these. One at a time!

The hood will need lots of attention at the front, and will need poor something inside to remove/stop the rust and of course protect.

More next time!

 
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midlife

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<------Having a heart attack seeing those wiring pictures...You need to give me tickets for a Cruise across the Pond so I can come and fix that wiring for you.  Afterwards (or during!) we can partake of the bounty of Europe (e.g. wine, cheese, food, women, etc.)

 

Fabrice

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Randy you were warned!! :)

Its weekend again, its super nice weather, time for a PS pump restoration! yay!

I wasn't planning do the PS pump anytime soon, but as just bought a small quantity of paint for the pulleys,

as its not cheap these days and there is always lots of loss for small items, I thought I'd better spray them all together.



and so I was back on another ugly rusty part...



The pump is original, and after sitting 20 years, turns out it pumps nicely, so started by turning the pulley by hand

and got most the oil out (thats what I thought at the time...)

Behind the pump there are two large nuts, and it was obvious, they were not planning to help me.

So I've used my vice as a wrench and got them loose. The first part of the bracket, some kind of protection for a connection comes loose too.



Unlike other pulleys simply bolted on, for the PS pulley, you have to extract it.

I have this kit for a while, and not a week ago, I was saying in a reply, I wasn't using it very often.

This is the first time in few years. So if you are in the USA and can borrow one, just do it.

Over here, I've in the past tried to find shops having this tool... none had one, and chances they would borrow were zero.

So ordered this kit. It allows me to remove few other types, and I hope it will work on the alternator that i need restore too. We'll see.



Like butter, the pulley came smoothly as I was cranking the pressure.

On this kit, because its having two grooves on both side, at some point, the stud is too short and I needed come back first, add a spacer, and continue.



Once the spacer is added, just one or two rotations extra on the tool and the pulley is finally separated from the pump.



Then its time to get the pump casing out, as it needs to be handled as well...

So the second big nut need go out, and on mine, there is still the original plate. Some say its because its never been serviced

I'd say I don't know, may be it was serviced at some point and someone put it back.



So I loose the 4 bolts on the front and start pull/move to get it out. A suction noise and wooosh!

[many bad words even Trump would not dare to say]

K, so now I know that when you think its empty, you actually are wrong. its not.

After cleaning, I saw it was like 250 cl. (a quart of a quart??? )

Now I got a water proof shiny floor :)



While at it, i'm going to service it, as I bought a kit for the 73, but turned out, the pump was simply having an air bubble to prime.



I thought, while at it, i'm gonna use it on this pump.

Because I no longer needed it for the 73, I've carefully bagged it and stored it in a box.

Of course, its been few weeks since then and totally forgot which one :) One hour past, and finally found it, of course in the last possible candidate box.

man, aging is horrible, I just past 50 and these little things tells me fun is about to begin :)



Then it was time to remove first all the sticky greasy dirt, and gave each part a nice bath of detergent.

The more I clean up, the more rust I discover...



Used to handle rust these days, I've bathed in dissolver, brushed and brushed and at some point

I thought: good enough. So washed these in clear water and let them dry in the hot sun. I saw on other parts which received the same treatment

that the dissolver leaves a layer that closes the metal pores, ideal for primer. The same yellowish layer was there as well.

Tho for a reason I ignore, the bolts get a flash rust layer within no time. Metal diff? So needed to brush them dry and thinner them once more.

I know many would buy new bolts. I would too if sizes were metrics. Unfortunately good bolts are heavy and the USA far away... As these and most bolts on these car are of a pretty good quality. Its worth the effort and not really much work.



After a final cleanup with thinner. It was primer time.

As all drys super fast with this weather, so I've apply the black coat to the body, stick and bolts as well.



Then it was time for the grey "natural" metallic coat that I've picked, and i could apply it onto the 2 other pulleys

and the chain cover.



Pulley looks fine, that "hard to find" tube too.



and so does all the parts.

Tomorrow they'll receive a clear coat, together with the fan that is waiting for a thin layer for a while.

If i would not have lost time looking for that #$%^ kit, the clear coat would be hardening right now...

Anyway, while all these parts were drying, I've continued on the pump internals.

Did many picts at each steps so it might help someone do the same (and help me remember the order for reassembly)

for now, I call it a day!

 
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Fabrice

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Still with an unusually nice weather over here, continued where I've left.

So first thing on the agenda was to apply the clear coat



In case you spray yourself, for this job I've used this gun(.8 mm nozzle), its way more economical than a "regular" gun (1.4mm). Its more directive and almost as precise as an airbrush. Makes it ideal for this kind of job.



Clear coat layer added, i've let dry, and reapplied 2 hours later on the other side of some parts.



(forward in time to yesterday eve)

Not fully hard, as it will take a few days to reach that state, but hard enough to the touch, it was time to remove the maskings as waiting longer would potentially lead to unsharp masking lines or even damage. The bits of chrome left over to the pulleys turned out nice and they marry well with the grey.

At this point, i can now mark the waterpump/crankshaft puleys, the fan and the chaincover done. After the pump reassembly, i will probably need to retouch the front pulley at center, and the bolts.

Comparing the parts state before and now, its clear a bit of love makes a difference!



I've forgot to mention, that for the pump pulley and the casing you must mask the axle holes. because the puley needs be pushed back in, a layer of paint, would make the job very hard, removing the paint there would be very hard. As for the casing, you don't want any paint in it, as its not just a casing for the looks, its a tank full of oil and you don't want paint chemicals in the oil or even worth, chunks of dry paint entering your steering components.

Meanwhile all this spraying I was busy with the pump...

First if you do the same: TAKE PICTURES! While its pretty straight forward job, this pump parts design allows few combinations for reassembly. all wrong except the right one!

Also you will need a vice even if all could be done "free hand", its really a must to have the pump secured while you work.



To open it, you need remove the 4 main bolts. As they are in oil all the time, they come out pretty easy. at this point. Take care you open gently, not because it would break, but because lots of components are spring loaded.



For the manifold side, as the parts are sealed with a o-ring, you need to tap gently, a tiny firm at the inlet.

and then: woosh! Again!

I was thinking I've learned that empty isn't empty. well, once more when its empty: its not! :)

If the pump o-ring is ok, there is still another glass of oil trapped in there above!



Then once you have both sides apart, its time to inspect for unusual wear. On mine, that was pumping ok, all was looking fine.

Notice here on pict top right the springs (taken against light to see the small springs). You really do not want to put this apart, because if its damaged/having wear. You will have to buy a new pump.

if ok, its fine as is. it just needs to be cleaned and inspected.



While busy cleaning the metal parts, also cleaned and painted the front of the pump and changed the axle seal.



Each and every part needs to be clean to be inspected, so you can also judge the wear by the black metal residues on the cloth you are using.

Also, on mine the old gasket left residues, so as you don't want to have any solid residues in there, i've used a small bits of 800 water sand paper, oiled it and

removed the gasket rests. Once done, cleaned all the surface before do anything else.



Here the a blank reassembly, still dirty, but wanted take picts before do it for real in one go, with fresh oil.



On this pict, the gasket, seals i've replaced. In the kit I bought, there are still 3 rings/gaskets left over. Made for a broad range of similar pumps, i suppose they ware for other applications.

As I haven't see any other to be changed parts. I know that on some casings, you also have some kind of a filter at the rear of the casing. So i guess these are made for this kind of diffs.

bath the new o-rings in oil before install them and later on, the surface of the casing where they are supposed to be in contact with.



On pict left, notice the extra hole. make sure you align before put the bolts back on. On the right the gasket. Can't say i'm impressed by the fit for the secondary passages.

After inspection of the old one, I saw its the exact same shape. So I guess it got to be ok, and resisted to modify/cut the gasket to fit better.



Finally its time to do the reassembly, this time, all clean. only o-rings and surface oiled. Using two cans of paint I had laying around, its just a matter of putting the parts on top of each other.

On the manifold, the two springs being loose, you need to gently lowdown so they do not fall. if the assembly is nicely vertical, all goes smooth. on the last bits, you need press a bit more as

you now have a new o-ring. Once popped in, set back the bolts. As you don't want to have leaks, make sure you tight first by hand, and then one turn at a time. jump to opposite bolt

so that both surfaces are always parallel. I couldn't find infos on the exact torque, but remembered the force i've used to loose them.

All with all, its pretty easy repair and considering the kit is really cheap vs new pump, 12 dollars I think.

From what I saw, the o-rings are the ones making the diff and I think that's what my 73 pump needs. The old ones are very hard to the touch and probably are loosing their sealing properties. If yours is not working properly, may your pump be damaged inside, this kit is useless and you will need a new pump anyway, but being in oil all the time, chances are high this dirty job is worth the effort. Glad I did it.

And as a bonus, you have in the end a shiny garage floor :) Next time I do this, I'll surely take this in account!

Been busy on other stuffs this weekend, but to keep a bit of logic in this thread, I'll finish this pump chapter first once back together.

 
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Vinnie

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OMG that picture on the hood is horrific!

The work you are doing looks great mate, awesome progress and a waterproof floor for free on top of a free 429. What a life ;-)

Cheers,

Vincent.

 

Fabrice

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OMG that picture on the hood is horrific!

The work you are doing looks great mate, awesome progress and a waterproof floor for free on top of a free 429. What a life ;-)

Cheers,

Vincent.
hahaha, Winnie, its not horrific, its art!!! 
lollerz.gif


In the 80's in France, at least in Paris, it was very 'in' to have an airbrush piece done on your bike tank, car etc...

Technically, this one is very well executed and was really a wow factor when showed. It must have cost quite a bit too. 

I recall see some would even take picts which was in the pre-digital age a pretty good compliment.

Sadly, as I share the same art taste as you do, I'm gonna have to disappoint the art critics.

Its not all bad tho, there is an excellent point associated to it. Because the artist used quite a lot of clear coat to protect it, half the hood is rust free.

I wish he did the entire hood! :)

 

Fabrice

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The PS pump internal puzzle and paint done, time to put all back together.



Just like the internals, the casing and pump design are not very well thought.

There are a few combinations possible to put them back together. Only one is good.

One easy thing to remember is that the hole on the pump casing is ment to suck the oil, and

must be located at the lowest point, so it gets oil at all times even if low.

So added a tape and marked it. Once together, they align.



During reassembly, as this design doesn't really help to keep things clean/undamaged

I've cut a few masks of board to prevent the socket to damage the paint while rotating and taped the nuts as well.



The kit I have is great for the removal but kinda very basic to put it back.

Just like the few other times I used it, I knew it would damaged the front, because the provided bearing supposed to be in contact with the surface isn't of the right size for this pump. The friction as expected ruined the paint. :(

I also saw I made a small mistake on the casing. I've masked the top end of the filling tube, expecting the stick to be like the 73... instead this one, doesn't have this "hat" thingy. grrr!



Just a reminder to compare and see me once more that its not because something looks like trash that it is trash.



Once back together, the pump looks like a new one, if not better.



tadaaaa !!

Aside the 2 small paint fixes that i'll do sometimes this week, then i'll fill it with fresh oil and store it.

I can now mark another part that nobody cares about as done! Yay!

Meanwhile been busy on other stuffs and received some new goodies as well.





to be continued...

 
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Fabrice

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Started the weekend finishing the pump paint flaws, put oil in it, like 1/2 the required, pumped/shacked it and it went into one of my "this_one_is_done" boxes.

Speaking about boxes, looked for long lug nuts that I have somewhere for Rich, aka @Rackerm, despite the time spent: location still unknown :(



In between things, gave bits of love to some other items, like this oil pressure sensor and many other little guys that will soon shine again on my already restored intake.

Missing now only a new waterpump and about to get my heads back prolly this week, I've started on the engine.

Bored over .30, with everything changed excepted the crankshaft, it has run like 200 miles before being put apart again, to find out one of the

Crower (or lunatti) cam lobe became round. Not using break-in oil and modern oil instead might have been the reason.

Checked by both a french and a dutch shop, they could not find any other potential cause. All was in perfect state, nothing damaged.

All rechecked, reassembled with some new details, it was placed in hibernation well oiled within layers and layers of plastic to prevent any corrosion.

The engine was cleaned and painted after the first rebuild, but for the second no external cleaning was added to the todo. Focus on the issue and money spent on

checks and reassembly. As a results, I now need to clean/remove the old paint where needed, pre-cleaning all the surfaces that will receive gaskets,

so I can soon start reassemble on a spotless block with a new colour. Purists may hate me for this, but no Ford blue in my cars.



After hours looking for other missing parts during past weeks, when I've finally open the many plastic layers around the block, I was very pleased to discover

that all the engine parts and bolts of the engine I was missing were on the block waiting for me.

Among them, was half of an engine mount. As these are very easy to find and very cheap (NOT!). I was kinda depressed.

The now complete mounts set was now ready for a refurbishing session. Did that with a big smile on my face :)



These babies are really no Mickey Mouse thingies, so I've used a more heavy brush to remove most of the corrosion, making in the process quite a bit of noise.

Unfortunately for my neighbours, I needed do the 4 pieces (and a few small ones) today :)

Bath them into rust dissolver for a few, rinsed them afterward in clear water. Cleaned/degreased one more time and masked the surprisingly in very good state rubber. Sprayed primer, paint on the pair and other parts like the restored damper timing pointer.

Too late to spray a final coat, they'll have to wait next weekend.



Did some body work too, but that'll be for another post..

Poof, the weekend is over and I'm now tired :)

 
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Fabrice

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During last few weeks, I saw each and every time I enter the garage that poor thing looking at me,

like if saying, why the PS pump and not me?

I wasn't planning do this, but couldn't stand that anymore! So the weekend started with this alternator!



As I like to see the before and after states. Here's the baby in its juice. Original, but pulleys, fan and brackets were chromed at some point.

Just like the other pulleys, chrome isn't to be saved, Tho may be partially and it may get the same treatment as the crank pulley. First need to clean that mess.



As I want to paint the pulley together with some other parts waiting for the same grey.

The pulley needs go off. Unlike the pump, this pulley needs first to loose a locking nut and then be pulled off.

Easy said, but bit more tricky to do it, as the alternator spins with ease and there are no way to block the rotation

other than an allen head shape in the middle. Doable and probably the official way to do it, but once more my do-anything vice came up with a simple trick that worked right away: Lock the unit so the blade would be sandwiched, and using progressive force, the lock nut came loose right away. Half work done, time for the pulley extraction.

That's when I enjoy to have had lots of problems over the years with all kinds of pulleys on bikes and cars. I have now a collection of pullers, and after tried a few for the fitment, go the one. Prob is that this particular puller, needs to push/rotate on the center, so the head in the middle becomes useless, as the alternator spins with no effort, I had to be creative with the vice and the tool. A long wench going thru the puller and the other side laying on the vice axle worked as a lock. Without much force, and thank to the penetrating oil applied before, the pulley and the fan behind came out.



Just like for all parts, after a degreasing, they all went into a rust desolver to end up in clear water and being dried.

They now wait with other parts to be brushed and later on painted.

The other side of the alternator will wait bits more for their massage, as I want know a bit more of the internals and their connection with the casing before I open a pandora box...

Plus my heads were back.



So last week, I went get my refreshed and cleaned up heads.

What a difference! Not that obvious on this pict, but aside the gasket surface, they were badly corroded and with a thick layer of carbon deposits.

The kind of rust that takes ages to remove, because you can't go easy everywhere and because these weight a ton, I opted for a lazy route for once. They received a chemical bath, a sound cleaning and because even after these there were not as I wanted they also got blasted on some bits where the rust was really thick.



a closer look says it all. I can now read the casting :) They look like new.

45 years later, you realize that the doc and details for this particular engine, is kinda thin at times.

So a big thanks to Steve aka @Secluff for helping me sort out the pile of parts that I have (and the ones that I don't),

and teach/guide me for this particular 429 engine and being a real friend. Thanks to Don C as well for his very sharp answers as I learn this engine.

I would have a much harder time to put it back together without your help.

I also learned a bit more of these heads, usually not being very attentive to original specs, Very different from the cleveland heads in 2V and 4V that I know.

These however are interresting pieces. First thing, when I got them back cleaned up: where do they go? couldn't find anything to help. me dumb, DOOE-R, I was expecting a DOOE-L :)

but no, turns out these heads, just like 385 series and interchangeable and can be put back on both side. But me being an old monkey, I preffer to have them back where they were.

Thanks to a bolt still on one head, that could only be one of the PS PUmp bracket (assuming you know how the bracket fits) as I could not find anything logic for it on the back of the engine, I knew which side. I also discovered after, unlike most 385 series heads castings that these heads have a very small 1 and 2 as well, probably reffering as bank. These confirmed the layout. These DOOE-R heads were shared by 429 Cobra Jet and Super Cobra Jet. The extra parts for the valves, springs were available in 71 on only boss 351 and CJ/SCJ.

Like an extra valve spring cup or the spring machined retainers and guides for the pushrods.

Usually I don't really care much, I know its a CJ car and DOOE-R. doesn't really ring a bell.

Things changes when you start read on forums/sites over 429/460 . Reading stuffs like "all the factory wedge head offerings for the 429/460 engine family, those heads have the portential to generate the greatest amount of power. They have the biggest valves, biggest ports, and smallest combustion chambers as delivered." Its also clear there are lots of people busy hunting these heads. 71cc / hign compression, as we still have 98 fuel over here, I surely listen to these numbers now :)



So today, after I got some tech answers on this specific heads, and the valves stems seals in particular, I've started to put them back together. Of course, an old monkey being an old monkey, no matter if the machine shop told me all was fine, I had to see it for myself and did quick turn paste each valve just to be sure :)

felt each and every valves, every hole with my finger to make sure all was smooth. Added oil for all contact surfaces with finger control first. Just so no grain of whatever could be found.



Of course all had to go back at the exact original location. all had first to be inspected, old dirt and patina cleaned and oiled before go back.

My valve compressor had a hard time and putting back the locks was tricky on the intake valves. It was just enough.



Tedious work, but eventually I got bank 1 done. and could not resist put them on the block just to see. That thing is huge :)

Now 8 x 6 more parts to clean, oil, inspect and install and i should have the second one done very soon.

I want put them back on the engine asap, so all can be painted in one go...

I did other things as well, but thats for another post ;)

 
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Fabrice

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Weekend again!



Just as with the other bank done last week, each valves checked and paste turned first.

Then the tedious "clean, inspect, oil, set new valve stem seal, assemble, repeat" cycle.

Probably routined from last week, was boring for sure, but all the little guys took their place back without any fight.



I want to paint the engine and "semi" close it asap (no spring pressure). But not planning rush durability, so

each "inner" bolt got cleaned and temp tested in block. While the external ones, went first for a brush massage, followed by few hours in rust dissolver, and to finish by a thin layer of paint.

I know I will damage the paint a bit when i'll torque them, but a there will be more paint details to be fixed before I check the engine done, so for now, each part goes back on clean and protected.



Tho perfectly functional, no play and only the expected corrosion on the metal in water passage/blade.

Until last week the plan was to order a new Ford aluminum water pump, as the current one was ugly and heavy. The part being in back order by Summit, I did not place the order after I saw the total (+shipment+import taxes). I thought, the current one is ugly as hell yes, but fully functional, strong and no play. What would happend if I let that thing dip into a dissolver for a few days... Turns out, most rust was gone, and tho still as ugly as before, I thought I could bring it back to an acceptable level of finish... Pretty pleased with the diff.



As said a few posts back, I've decided not go for Ford blue. I reallly really dislike this color and can't find any reason to put a color that is a lightyear from any colour combos that I will use.

Instead went for a Ford grey for the engine (with a small drup extra of yellow in its composition so its not as cold as a classic solid grey) and should marry nicely with the aluminium intake, valve covers and also the already painted pulleys using a metallic version that is a tad colder.

Anyway, the day ended with a pump that is looking pretty good. Saves me almost 500 to get the new one here, and even if it would break on me, it will surely hold a few thousand miles before it does. Before I have that many miles on this baby its got take some time. May it break, replacing a water pump is easy, so I figured I could better use that budget on parts I don't/must have versus the one that I have and can restore. Cost bit more time than hit the order button for sure but no regret at this point.

to be continued...

 

Fabrice

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Started the day taping the engine so it would receive a fresh coat.

Bad luck, bought paint tape this week for this, and this supposed to be sharp tape turned out to not want to stick on the metal.

It has an excellent adhesion on painted surfaces, ideal for many things but not painting my block... so pushed than one for next week.

Plenty to do, so instead painted the front fender interior of the 73. Placed a thick souple primer that is ment to absorb little stones impacts a while back, but being white-ish, I needed bring an extra black layer first. So did that today...



Pump wasn't finished yet, so while the fender was drying up, I've finished it.



Another before/after reminder that bits of work can make a huge diff.

Still have to id each bolts required from the pile of bolts that I have and prep them, but at least, I can mark the water pump as done!

Busy with more items at same time so I can regroup spraying sessions and have less waste.

One of the "in between big things" candidate, is the wiper motor.



That's how the baby was spending its days on the car... (@midlife close your eyes!)



It's clear that at some point in time, a crucial part of the wiper motor assembly got lost.

Probably very hard to come by during the 80's or 90's, someone had to think hard and came up with a creative alternative for this missing bracket...



Usually not available alone unless you'd buy a used wipermotor, was lucky and found the missing bracket on E-bay but was with shipping cost to Europe a pricy bit of pressed metal. (no global shipment program on)

More lucky, as this forum hosts very nice people! @tony-muscle had a trip to Europe planned and offered to bring small and light parts with him (for me and other European members) and posted them from London, England his first stop. Thanks to Tony's kindness, I've received the bracket this week and it's been already handled. It joined end of the day my to be finished basket. The grommets, brass fittings, the rest of the rusty motor and of course the cowl vent are under surgery or about to be...

More rusty things next time :)

 
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midlife

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Started the day taping the engine so it would receive a fresh coat.

Bad luck, bought paint tape this week for this, and this supposed to be sharp tape turned out to not want to stick on the metal.

It has an excellent adhesion on painted surfaces, ideal for many things but not painting my block... so pushed than one for next week.

Busy with more items at same time so I can regroup spraying sessions and have less waste.

One of the "in between big things" candidate, is the wiper motor.



That's how the baby was spending its days on the car... (@midlife close your eyes!)

I'm not sure that is an 71-73 wiper motor, but I know for a fact that the connector is not OEM!  Here's what it's mate should look like:





 

Fabrice

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I'm not sure that is an 71-73 wiper motor, but I know for a fact that the connector is not OEM!  Here's what it's mate should look like:



I know for a fact that the connector is not OEM!

ahahaha, pretty sure too :)

Yup, that's the connector I talked to you about in my PM, similar as on the 73. Question is, are these available somewhere or wiper motor harnesses with it and if not what would be a good alternative to this connector?

 

midlife

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Might be available as 4 pin trailer connectors, but I can cobble up a mating pair for you. Be warned: once mated, they may create lots of mini-connectors, much like rabbits when they mate.

If you find a used wiper motor, it should come with a good connector on it. Don at OMS may have one. All 7123's should use the same wiper motor.

 
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I did not read every line of the post but I see the car has a 6 digit DSO code. That means it has options added to the build that are not regular production options. Can be paint, trim, wheels, etc.. the Build sheet will show what the special additions are on the bottom half.

Marti cannot event tell you what the Special Order Items were he does not have than info. If you do not have the build sheet no way to find out what the Special Order was.

Hope you have the build sheet would love to know what was Special on the car.

If it did not violate EPA or safety regulations Ford would do anything you wanted.

I do not have the stud you need Sorry.

David

 
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David, since the DSO starts with 90,  that car was built specifically for export. The "0469" would be the DSO order number to deviate from RPO items and add or change what ever was necessary to comply with the shipped to country's laws. More than likely things such as the KPH speedometer and adjust to the left headlights for right hand drive countries.

99% of the time a domestic DSO order on a car was an exterior color request. That's why most of the time you see a DSO number on a non export vehicle (such as on your car) the paint code section was blank. Fabrice's car has "C" for Dark Ivy Green Metallic.

Ford kept some DSO info for fleet and special truck orders, but the car DSO info went to the dealer and became their responsibility. And as Dealers transitioned to computers and upgraded those systems over the years, you know what happened to stacks of paper reports that were deemed no longer necessary and were taking up valuable space.  Agree with you, if the build sheet is missing or illegible, the chances of finding what was actually special ordered on your vehicle is not good!     :)

 
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